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Thread: Quick Wave Interference Question

  1. #1 Quick Wave Interference Question 
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    Hi. Could anyone tell me what would happen if these two waves meet? I would also appreciate it if anyone could explain to me how they arrived at their conclusion.



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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    I have a suspicion that this may be a homework problem...?

    They will interfere with each other. You'll have to figure out whether the interference will be constructive or destructive....

    That's all I'll give for now....

    Cheers,
    william


    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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  4. #3  
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    Do you know who she is? such mathematically perfect puppies, just waiting to be slammed together, pity about the missing nipples though.
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  5. #4  
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    i do physics because of my love for the subject and when i'm stuck i go get help. at the moment i'm stuck. I'm testing myself with past papers before the actual exam...

    please help if you can and i think you can.
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  6. #5  
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    it's a 'he'
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  7. #6  
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    What Will was trying to say was GOOGLE IT - the word being INTERFERENCE.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petroleum
    it's a 'he'
    Yikes!

    Okay, here's what to do. Measure the vertical 'height' (from the horizontal center) of the wave on the right at some point. Make sure to note if that height is negative.

    Then move to the wave on the left at the same point that you measured the height of the right wave and measure that height. Again, make careful note if the height is negative.

    Add the two numbers. If the absolute value of the sum gets larger (smaller) than either of the original heights, it's constructive (destructive).

    Do that and tell us your answer.

    cheers
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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  9. #8  
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    why not v = v1 sin(2pi f t +phi1)+ v2 sin (2 pi f t + phi2)

    or is that being horrible?
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  10. #9  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Megabrain
    why not v = v1 sin(2pi f t +phi1)+ v2 sin (2 pi f t + phi2)

    or is that being horrible?
    Or you could do this.
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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