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Thread: A dimension higher than 3/4 which can be indirectly seen?

  1. #1 A dimension higher than 3/4 which can be indirectly seen? 
    Universalis Infinitis Devon Keogh's Avatar
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    If I watch an object, on a parabolic trajectory from the earth, would the force being exerted on the object by gravity be the realization of seeing a dimension higher than 3-4 (4 being light) as this is force is actually a representation of the bending of space into this dimension?



    "If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
    Sir Isaac Newton

    In my own opinion there is no greater mathematical Principle than that which is x - x = 0. This shows that matter can be created from nothing as long as the total product of the matter's mass & energy equal exactly zero.
    The only question is, "Where did all that antimatter go?"

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    Universalis Infinitis Devon Keogh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Light being dimension 4. What are you on about.
    There is a prevailing view among cosmologists that light is actually a "fallout" from the 4th dimension, mabye the fifth.

    Lol, getting my dimensions mixed up.



    "If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
    Sir Isaac Newton

    In my own opinion there is no greater mathematical Principle than that which is x - x = 0. This shows that matter can be created from nothing as long as the total product of the matter's mass & energy equal exactly zero.
    The only question is, "Where did all that antimatter go?"

    Favourite Elements: Sodium, Neodymium, Xenon
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  4. #3  
    Genius Duck Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    If I watch an object, on a parabolic trajectory from the earth, would the force being exerted on the object by gravity be the realization of seeing a dimension higher than 3-4 (4 being light) as this is force is actually a representation of the bending of space into this dimension?
    I have no idea how, or why, you think light is the/ a "4th dimension".
    Nor is gravity a dimension, it's a force (or a curvature of spacetime).
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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    Genius Duck Dywyddyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    There is a prevailing view among cosmologists that light is actually a "fallout" from the 4th dimension, mabye the fifth.
    Citation needed.
    "[Dywyddyr] makes a grumpy bastard like me seem like a happy go lucky scamp" - PhDemon
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  6. #5  
    Universalis Infinitis Devon Keogh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    If I watch an object, on a parabolic trajectory from the earth, would the force being exerted on the object by gravity be the realization of seeing a dimension higher than 3-4 (4 being light) as this is force is actually a representation of the bending of space into this dimension?
    I have no idea how, or why, you think light is the/ a "4th dimension".
    Nor is gravity a dimension, it's a force (or a curvature of spacetime).
    Gravity is not a dimension, I mean that the curvature of spacetime which makes force is another dimension and gravity represents this.

    If you feel that the light as a dimension idea is off-putting, then please ignore it. I dont want it to get in the way of the actual topic.

    "If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
    Sir Isaac Newton

    In my own opinion there is no greater mathematical Principle than that which is x - x = 0. This shows that matter can be created from nothing as long as the total product of the matter's mass & energy equal exactly zero.
    The only question is, "Where did all that antimatter go?"

    Favourite Elements: Sodium, Neodymium, Xenon
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    Gravity is not a dimension, I mean that the curvature of spacetime which makes force is another dimension and gravity represents this.
    Citation needed.
    If you feel that the light as a dimension idea is off-putting, then please ignore it. I dont want it to get in the way of the actual topic.
    What is the actual topic then?
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  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    If I watch an object, on a parabolic trajectory from the earth, would the force being exerted on the object by gravity be the realization of seeing a dimension higher than 3-4 (4 being light) as this is force is actually a representation of the bending of space into this dimension?
    Ok, I think you are not really clear on the definition of the term "dimension" - basically and non-technically, the number of dimensions in a space is the minimum amount of information you need to uniquely specify a point. In our universe, you need three coordinates to specify a position ( left-right, front-back, up-down ), as well as a time coordinate to specify an event uniquely. Therefore our universe is 4-dimensional. Forces, light, gravity etc do not come into this at all.
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  9. #8  
    Universalis Infinitis Devon Keogh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    If I watch an object, on a parabolic trajectory from the earth, would the force being exerted on the object by gravity be the realization of seeing a dimension higher than 3-4 (4 being light) as this is force is actually a representation of the bending of space into this dimension?
    Ok, I think you are not really clear on the definition of the term "dimension" - basically and non-technically, the number of dimensions in a space is the minimum amount of information you need to uniquely specify a point. In our universe, you need three coordinates to specify a position ( left-right, front-back, up-down ), as well as a time coordinate to specify an event uniquely. Therefore our universe is 4-dimensional. Forces, light, gravity etc do not come into this at all.
    I am thinking of the curvature of space. Does that curvature not show that there is another specific point of movement?

    "If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
    Sir Isaac Newton

    In my own opinion there is no greater mathematical Principle than that which is x - x = 0. This shows that matter can be created from nothing as long as the total product of the matter's mass & energy equal exactly zero.
    The only question is, "Where did all that antimatter go?"

    Favourite Elements: Sodium, Neodymium, Xenon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    I am thinking of the curvature of space. Does that curvature not show that there is another specific point of movement?
    No, a curved 4-dimensional spacetime is still 4-dimensional. You are possibly thinking that the curvature implies that the spacetime is embedded in a higher-dimensional space, but this is not true (i.e. the curvature does not require that it be embedded).
    There are no paradoxes in relativity, just people's misunderstandings of it.
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  11. #10  
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    A simple-ish way to show that is by imagining a 2D universe like in a video game. You can make that 2D universe curve in such a way that it would look like the surface of a sphere if you tried to show the whole thing at once, but to someone in that universe, it's still just 2D.
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  12. #11  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devon Keogh View Post
    I am thinking of the curvature of space. Does that curvature not show that there is another specific point of movement?
    No - the curvature used to model gravitation is intrinsic curvature, and does not rely on or require any external dimensions or points of reference.
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