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Thread: Planck energy

  1. #1 Planck energy 
    Forum Junior whizkid's Avatar
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    Hi,
    could you please check if the formula for Planck energy here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_units#Derived_units is wrong? I cannot get the given value
    Thanks


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  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whizkid View Post
    Hi,
    could you please check if the formula for Planck energy here:Planck units - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is wrong? I cannot get the given value
    Thanks
    The formula is right, as are all others on the page in question. Re-check your calculation, and pay particular attention to the units, and you will get the correct value in the end.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Junior whizkid's Avatar
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    Thanks, Markus,
    I read that plancks mass was derived setting the schwarzschild radius equal to the Compton wavelength (with a factor o pi)
    (2)GM/c^2 = h (/2pi)
    If it makes sense to you, what is the meaning of it. It would be ramarkable that Planck discovered it long before!

    and, can a particle have a compton wavelenght smaller than its size?
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    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whizkid View Post
    Thanks, Markus,
    I read that plancks mass was derived setting the schwarzschild radius equal to the Compton wavelength (with a factor o pi)
    (2)GM/c^2 = h (/2pi)
    If it makes sense to you, what is the meaning of it. It would be ramarkable that Planck discovered it long before!
    Actually I am not sure how it was first derived, but I suspect it was not via the black hole argument. Having said that, the derivation via Schwarzschild radius and Compton wavelength is by far the simplest one.

    and, can a particle have a compton wavelenght smaller than its size?
    The Compton wavelength is a function of mass, not size, so I see no reason why this wouldn't be possible.
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