Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By Implicate Order

Thread: Do all forces travel as wave?

  1. #1 Do all forces travel as wave? 
    New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    2
    My question is: do all forces travel as a wave? In essence do all forces take time to travel.

    Example: If I were to push on one end of the an infinitely long rod, would it take a calculable amount of time for the other end to move?

    Thanks


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Rickbob View Post
    My question is: do all forces travel as a wave? In essence do all forces take time to travel.
    Example: If I were to push on one end of the an infinitely long rod, would it take a calculable amount of time for the other end to move?
    Yes, all such "forces" move at finite speeds. If you were to push on one end of a very long rod, the "push" would travel through the material at the speed of sound, and arrive at the other end after a finite time. It is not instantaneous.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,302
    MODERATOR NOTE : This belongs into the Physics section. Moved.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    794
    wel I think if even light travels as wave ... than probably everthing travels like wave but... than again there are maybe unknown forces materias to me...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    39
    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Yes, all such "forces" move at finite speeds. If you were to push on one end of a very long rod, the "push" would travel through the material at the speed of sound, and arrive at the other end after a finite time. It is not instantaneous.
    But it would be instantaneous in ideal conditions, provided that we had an non-condensable rod, wouldn't it? What's the principle behind this?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Masters Degree Implicate Order's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    27.4679 S, 153.0278 E
    Posts
    610
    Quote Originally Posted by rickettsie View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Yes, all such "forces" move at finite speeds. If you were to push on one end of a very long rod, the "push" would travel through the material at the speed of sound, and arrive at the other end after a finite time. It is not instantaneous.
    But it would be instantaneous in ideal conditions, provided that we had an non-condensable rod, wouldn't it? What's the principle behind this?
    This question has seen intense scrutiny over the past starting with Newtonian Mechanics of rigid bodies which supports the theoretical notion that FTL is possible if perfectly rigid bodies existed, to special relativity which forbids it.

    Currently I believe that at present in relativity the tacit assumption is that no such perfectly rigid bodies can exist. In practice relativity imposes limits on the rigidity of materials attributed to the fact that rigid bodies are composites of fundamental particles and that properties such as rigidity are determined by electrical interactions between atoms and that those interactions cannot be propogated > c. :-))
    Markus Hanke and rickettsie like this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Implicate Order View Post
    Currently I believe that at present in relativity the tacit assumption is that no such perfectly rigid bodies can exist. In practice relativity imposes limits on the rigidity of materials attributed to the fact that rigid bodies are composites of fundamental particles and that properties such as rigidity are determined by electrical interactions between atoms and that those interactions cannot be propogated > c. :-))
    Thank you, I could not have put this any better
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 17th, 2012, 09:43 AM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: April 2nd, 2012, 03:51 AM
  3. Use Time Travel Curve to Get Information Abo S Wave
    By rh10031994 in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 11th, 2010, 11:28 AM
  4. there are 6 fundamental forces not 4...
    By kryon of magnetic dna in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: April 13th, 2009, 04:57 PM
  5. Forces over distance
    By Waldheri in forum Physics
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: October 30th, 2008, 08:22 PM
Tags for this Thread

View Tag Cloud

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •