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Thread: Centripetal acceleration

  1. #1 Centripetal acceleration 
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    I am having a lot of trouble solving this problem.

    A satellite that is 4175 miles from the center of the earth, orbits with a period of 90 minutes. What is its centripetal acceleration?

    I converted 4,175 mi into 6,717,575 m and 90 min into 5,400 sec.

    For VT I got 7,816.25 m/sec.

    And Ac = 49,111 mi/sec2

    Help? I have no clue what I'm doing.


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  3. #2  
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    deleted by god


    Last edited by Gere; October 3rd, 2013 at 04:00 PM.
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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by cityyy View Post
    I am having a lot of trouble solving this problem.

    A satellite that is 4175 miles from the center of the earth, orbits with a period of 90 minutes. What is its centripetal acceleration?

    I converted 4,175 mi into 6,717,575 m and 90 min into 5,400 sec.

    For VT I got 7,816.25 m/sec.

    And Ac = 49,111 mi/sec2

    Help? I have no clue what I'm doing.




    , , so, the correct answer is , you were off by several orders of magnitude.
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  5. #4  
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    The radius of the earth is 3959 miles. The acceleration due to gravity on earth is 32 feet per second per second. The gravitational acceleration falls of according to the inverse square law. x=32*(3959/4175)2=28.77 feet per second per second, or .00545 miles/sec/sec.

    When I do it xyzt's way I get .005652. Did you make an arithmetic error, xyzt?
    Last edited by Harold14370; October 3rd, 2013 at 12:25 PM.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gere View Post
    i got 0.00014 mi/s*s .
    Nope.
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    delete
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  8. #7  
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    So a would equal .0057mi/sec2 ?
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by cityyy View Post
    So a would equal .0057mi/sec2 ?


    ,
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  10. #9  
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    Damn Im so stupid.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold14370 View Post
    The radius of the earth is 3959 miles. The acceleration due to gravity on earth is 32 feet per second per second. The gravitational acceleration falls of according to the inverse square law. x=32*(3959/4175)2=28.77 feet per second per second, or .00545 miles/sec/sec.

    When I do it xyzt's way I get .005652. Did you make an arithmetic error, xyzt?
    I calculated in my head, so it is possible that I made a numerical error, the numbers are very large. The symbolic result is , of course, correct.
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