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Thread: A new idea to kill Mosquitos ?

  1. #1 A new idea to kill Mosquitos ? 
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    i am thinking to develop some thing different and more reliable and cost less technique to kill mosquito's. Now a day we use Mosquitos Bat (Basic principal is Electric shock...can harm the child or that is makes sound during process) poison Spray (very harmful for us) ...etc ..every method have limitation.
    What if the light in our home became the cause to kill mosquito or to repel them out side the house. is it possible to make such tube lights that emit such a light that will not harmful for other species instead of mosquito.
    Can we develop such a light emitting source that filter our surrounding from bacterias and harmful insect.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    Can we develop such a light emitting source that filter our surrounding from bacterias and harmful insect.
    U.V. lights can help with germ prevention- but mosquitoes are a bit sturdier than that.

    Being a breeder of Mosquito Hawks may be helpful.
    Also called mosquito eaters or crane fly.

    Some idiots call them "giant mosquitoes" and try to kill them, usually resulting in pissing me off and leaving them as nothing but a red mist floating in the air.


    Sooo... back on topic!

    According to Forbes magazine, some other guy was thinking along the same lines as you. His name is Sazabollocks Marak... Svobhal'a Marakus.... Szabolcs Márka... something like that:
    Using A Light Barrier To Repel Mosquitoes - Forbes

    He looks like a really mean guy.


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    5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants | Eartheasy Blog

    There are plants that naturally repel mosquitoes. You really don't need anything fancy.
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    You have to be careful about insect repelling plants. I remember reading a piece by an organic gardening writer. She'd always scoffed at basil's reputation for repelling flies.

    And then one day she harvested buckets of the stuff to take to the local farmers market. The buckets were sitting outside the kitchen door. And there were no flies. The lesson being, if you want plants that repel or kill insects, be prepared to have massive quantities of that plant in exactly the right place for the effect you want.
    "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen." Winston Churchill
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    Can we develop such a light emitting source that filter our surrounding from bacterias and harmful insect.
    U.V. lights can help with germ prevention- but mosquitoes are a bit sturdier than that.

    Being a breeder of Mosquito Hawks may be helpful.
    Also called mosquito eaters or crane fly.

    Some idiots call them "giant mosquitoes" and try to kill them, usually resulting in pissing me off and leaving them as nothing but a red mist floating in the air.


    Sooo... back on topic!

    According to Forbes magazine, some other guy was thinking along the same lines as you. His name is Sazabollocks Marak... Svobhal'a Marakus.... Szabolcs Márka... something like that:
    Using A Light Barrier To Repel Mosquitoes - Forbes

    He looks like a really mean guy.
    I think we should experiment what kind of wave length light effect mosquito ...or it may be possible at certain frequency mosquito body get paralysis. but that frequency light must be harmless for humans and other species.
    Once i have seen a instrument in the market that make buzzer or beep sound to avoid wall lizard. because that specific type of sound frequency directly effect insect brain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants | Eartheasy Blog

    There are plants that naturally repel mosquitoes. You really don't need anything fancy.
    ya its true their is certain plants to repel mosquito but it is not reliable and easy method. People who are living in Flats cant use this method. Any way plants need much more time to grow. The people who are living in Congested area can grow tree or plants arround their home.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    specific type of sound frequency directly effect insect brain.
    Correct. Insects rely heavily on vibration or strobe frequencies to sense the world, and also to communicate. The sensed Hz appear to translate directly into their brains, resonating with pathways (behaviours) that operate on the same frequency.

    Neverfly's suggestion to investigate mosquito hawks is good, though it's dragonflies not craneflies that eat mosquitoes. You may be able to scare mosquitoes with a tone or strobe matching this predator's wingbeat. My personal guess is this won't work well, because dragonflies modulate their wingbeats - I hypothesize they do this to "cloak" their identity or disposition while stalking insect prey.

    Another avenue might be to lure mosquitoes (to death) by simulating a mate. You can only lure them one by one though, because of their peculiar courtship: Mosquito wings beat ~600 Hz, depending on species; the female emits a slightly higher tone than the male. When any two random mosquitoes meet, they slowly fly toward each other (which changes their apparent frequencies to them alone), and steadily adjust their wingbeats so their tones converge. Success leads to mating. When two males approach each other their tones rapidly diverge, and they fly apart before getting too close. There might be more going on there we don't know. Anyway, I think what could work is a microphone and speaker set to emit the appropriate (converging) feedback to a mosquito flying in range. And some kind of deathtrap at the speaker of course. This could be a very cheap little battery-powered device.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    specific type of sound frequency directly effect insect brain.
    I think what could work is a microphone and speaker set to emit the appropriate (converging) feedback to a mosquito flying in range. And some kind of deathtrap at the speaker of course. This could be a very cheap little battery-powered device.
    i appreciate your thought to lure the mosquito for sex toward female and really its a good thought. but this is not possible to create a amplified feed back sound with the help of mic. because mic will capture all the sounds in the room of all frequency. So solution is we have to made a mic that only capture or sense 600HZ frequency and amplify for our purpose.
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    Sounds good. The frequency depends on species. So to make the device universal it could have a test tone and dial one adjusts until the tone sounds like local mosquitoes.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    i am thinking to develop some thing different and more reliable and cost less technique to kill mosquito's. Now a day we use Mosquitos Bat (Basic principal is Electric shock...can harm the child or that is makes sound during process) poison Spray (very harmful for us) ...etc ..every method have limitation.
    What if the light in our home became the cause to kill mosquito or to repel them out side the house. is it possible to make such tube lights that emit such a light that will not harmful for other species instead of mosquito.
    Can we develop such a light emitting source that filter our surrounding from bacterias and harmful insect.
    I have given this a great deal of thought since my Dad was a "Malaria-Survivor" --- and recently invented a solar-powered outdoor lamp that "attracts" and kills mosquitoes. It is based on the science that an outdoor light attracts insects at night in the dark. Inside the lamp is a jar with organic material that is decomposing which gives off a vapor that kills mosquitoes. It is not instant. The female mosquito buzzes around the lamp, inhales a molecule or two of the vapor and flys off to die. You can see more information at "mosquito-genie" dot com --- feel free to click on all our tabs especially "How It Works". It is a patented product and really works. I spent five years in development because I wanted something for consumers that was natural and multi-functional. Most of the time you just think of it as a nice outdoor table lamp, but in about three weeks you will feel the difference. Cheers --- Tom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Being a breeder of Mosquito Hawks may be helpful.
    Also called mosquito eaters or crane fly.
    I don't think they actually eat mosquitoes. Maybe larvae, but I don't see how they could predate the adult insect.

    What I do know is that they can damage plants in their larval state, so I wouldn't recommend breeding them.

    There are many species of plants that do a much better job of deterring mosquitoes (citronella immediately comes to mind). If you plant it near a breeding area, it may keep them from laying their eggs nearby. It will not, however, keep them away from you unless you're surrounded by them.

    We have a particularly nasty tiny black mosquito that spawns in the woods behind our house and, I maintain at the chuckles of my wife, are capable of killing a full grown man in a matter of seconds.

    EDIT: Oh, and don't kill spiders. I usually take the ones I find inside out into the woods. I had a neighbor once who used to kill every living thing that came near her house and subsequently complain about the increase in the population of the now-annihilated creature's prey. I'll take spiders over mosquitoes any day.
    Last edited by Flick Montana; May 20th, 2013 at 10:20 AM.
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    It's funny... all my life I've been informed that mosquito hawks eat mosquitoes.
    The irony of being a member on a science forum is how often it is that I learn that the acquired knowledge I have is often incorrect...

    I suppose I feel better though, knowing that all those mosquito hawks people killed thinking they were giant mosquitoes weren't eating mosquitoes anyway.
    I wonder if I just set a record for how many times a person can say mosquito in one post...

    Mosquito, mosquito, mosquito, mosquito, mosquito!

    Spiders---- rock on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    It's funny... all my life I've been informed that mosquito hawks eat mosquitoes..
    I suppose the fact that they are called mosquito hawks could have something to do with that, especially given what some insects like the more aptly-named tarantula hawk do.

    I can contribute to the misconceptions; I used to believe that daddy longlegs (harvestmen) were deadly poisonous, but simply lacked fangs of sufficient length to puncture human skin.
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    Oh, and mosquito pro-tip of the day; build a bat box.

    I love bats.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    I can contribute to the misconceptions; I used to believe that daddy longlegs (harvestmen) were deadly poisonous, but simply lacked fangs of sufficient length to puncture human skin.
    I had only recently, in the past year or so, learned that was another misconception, as well. Courtesy of the forum and Snopes, if I recall...

    A tidbit: It used to be the forum but SeaGypsy has been a rather heavy instigator of researching acquired knowledge, as well. I will often get frustrated when she's skeptical of the "facts" I'll spit out, time to time. So I go to show her skepticism as unwarranted only to learn I was a sucker.
    I could rattle off a list of things I've learned I was wrong about thanks to her questioning of the validity of it, including the Mattel M-16 myth (Hey, Mattel really DID make some of the Rubber Ducky's used in basic training) and the Mr. Rogers sniper myth.

    Bats rock, too. I guess those two posts increased your daily batting average... ohh...
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    Why are there a dozen different critters named daddy longlegs? I've also heard those spindly little yellow spiders that like to live in the corners called daddy longlegs. So confusing.
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    I love bats, but I foresee a problem.

    Let's see....

    You find yourself inundated with mosquitoes. So you build a bat box and acquire some bats. They eat the mosquitoes. You run out of mosquitoes and bats fly away. Mosquitoes come back.

    ?
    In order to keep the bats close to home, would you be forced to then keep standing water around to attract the very insects you are trying to get rid of or else lose your method of ridding yourself of that insect.

    Seems the next logical answer would be, move to the desert where there are no damned mosquitoes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Why are there a dozen different critters named daddy longlegs? I've also heard those spindly little yellow spiders that like to live in the corners called daddy longlegs. So confusing.
    Because it's not as impressive to hear, mommy longlegs, brother longlegs, auntie longlegs and cousin itlegs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverfly View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    I can contribute to the misconceptions; I used to believe that daddy longlegs (harvestmen) were deadly poisonous, but simply lacked fangs of sufficient length to puncture human skin.
    I had only recently, in the past year or so, learned that was another misconception, as well. Courtesy of the forum and Snopes, if I recall...

    A tidbit: It used to be the forum but SeaGypsy has been a rather heavy instigator of researching acquired knowledge, as well. I will often get frustrated when she's skeptical of the "facts" I'll spit out, time to time. So I go to show her skepticism as unwarranted only to learn I was a sucker.
    I could rattle off a list of things I've learned I was wrong about thanks to her questioning of the validity of it, including the Mattel M-16 myth (Hey, Mattel really DID make some of the Rubber Ducky's used in basic training) and the Mr. Rogers sniper myth.

    Bats rock, too. I guess those two posts increased your daily batting average... ohh...
    Sooner or later all your misconceptions will be exposed and cleared up. For the rest of us that don't have a SG close by, well we'll have to take our misconceptions to the grave with us.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    I love bats, but I foresee a problem.

    Let's see....

    You find yourself inundated with mosquitoes. So you build a bat box and acquire some bats. They eat the mosquitoes. You run out of mosquitoes and bats fly away. Mosquitoes come back.

    ?
    In order to keep the bats close to home, would you be forced to then keep standing water around to attract the very insects you are trying to get rid of or else lose your method of ridding yourself of that insect.

    Seems the next logical answer would be, move to the desert where there are no damned mosquitoes.
    Yeah! Bats are good. But in every group of people mosquitoes always seem to pick on one or two more than the others. Does anybody know why this is? Something they eat maybe? If we could figure out why mosquitoes don't like some people, it might become a million dollar product.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    I love bats, but I foresee a problem.

    Let's see....

    You find yourself inundated with mosquitoes. So you build a bat box and acquire some bats. They eat the mosquitoes. You run out of mosquitoes and bats fly away. Mosquitoes come back.

    ?
    In order to keep the bats close to home, would you be forced to then keep standing water around to attract the very insects you are trying to get rid of or else lose your method of ridding yourself of that insect.

    Seems the next logical answer would be, move to the desert where there are no damned mosquitoes.
    In my experience, bats tend to move around a lot. I've had a bat box before and it's gone years with no bats and other years where they are packed tight in there. Wherever there is food and a place to roost, they will show up.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    But in every group of people mosquitoes always seem to pick on one or two more than the others. Does anybody know why this is? Something they eat maybe? If we could figure out why mosquitoes don't like some people, it might become a million dollar product.
    I've come across very different ideas on this: One is that breeding females bite everyone equally but different people will show different reactions.
    For example any mosquito that bites me has little effect. The black ones FlickMontana may have mentioned (If they are the same breed, they are black but with very tiny white spots) have the least effect on me at all. Within thirty minutes of being bitten, the welts are totally gone with those. Other breeds, the welts will last an hour or two.
    Certain cat fleas, I've had the welts last for days whereas S.G. suffered horribly when our cat brought home fleas.

    The other thought is that certain people attract mosquito bites. There is little evidence for this, but it's not implausible.

    But there is something that's a bit of a hitch, here: the Plasmodium- and if I get this wrong... others fix it. Because I'm a bit busy at the moment and not in the mood to google it all up (Which is probably why I have some misconceptions lingering in my skull- meh anyway). Humans infected with a certain plasmodium will be made more tasty by the plasmodium as a cheap trick for survival- it lures in suckling skeeters giving the breeding plasmodium a stronger chance of spreading and survival.
    Among other things, it can cause Malaria.
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    You could be right about that. I'd like to see any studies that have been done on this subject. I found a few choice pictures for everyone's enjoyment.







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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    It's an interesting problem. I've done a lot of fieldwork in the tropics in Asia and Africa and I can't say I've never been bitten but it's rare and I don't recall ever having any welts or reaction to the bites. Colleagues of mine in the same places seem to have been bitten to buggery and have had itchy welts everywhere... I've heard arguments it's related to the composition of your sweat and/or breath, some people emit something the mozzies love others don't but I've never come across any hard evidence to support this...
    I came across this article that does support the idea that mosquitoes do like some better than others. Seems to be mostly a genetic property in people.

    Why Do Mosquitoes Bite Some People More Than Others?
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    It's not just mosquitoes.

    My singing teacher spent a few years in a small opera company touring in Italy, sometimes quite small, poor towns. Which meant that she and one of the other women in the company quite often had to share a bed in small hotels. She'd wake up absolutely covered in bites from bedbugs while the other woman was unaffected. She wasn't entirely thrilled that the Italians all laughed it off as "sweet blood".
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    I love bats, but I foresee a problem.

    Let's see....

    You find yourself inundated with mosquitoes. So you build a bat box and acquire some bats. They eat the mosquitoes. You run out of mosquitoes and bats fly away. Mosquitoes come back.

    ?
    In order to keep the bats close to home, would you be forced to then keep standing water around to attract the very insects you are trying to get rid of or else lose your method of ridding yourself of that insect.

    Seems the next logical answer would be, move to the desert where there are no damned mosquitoes.
    In my experience, bats tend to move around a lot. I've had a bat box before and it's gone years with no bats and other years where they are packed tight in there. Wherever there is food and a place to roost, they will show up.
    bats of Austin, TX have been around for a while and have become a tourist attraction. We were passing by there recently at the time they come out and it was amazing to see.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    It's an interesting problem. I've done a lot of fieldwork in the tropics in Asia and Africa and I can't say I've never been bitten but it's rare and I don't recall ever having any welts or reaction to the bites. Colleagues of mine in the same places seem to have been bitten to buggery and have had itchy welts everywhere... I've heard arguments it's related to the composition of your sweat and/or breath, some people emit something the mozzies love others don't but I've never come across any hard evidence to support this...
    When I'm in the field, I get absolutely ravaged by mosquitoes. I've developed an intense hatred of them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    It's an interesting problem. I've done a lot of fieldwork in the tropics in Asia and Africa and I can't say I've never been bitten but it's rare and I don't recall ever having any welts or reaction to the bites. Colleagues of mine in the same places seem to have been bitten to buggery and have had itchy welts everywhere... I've heard arguments it's related to the composition of your sweat and/or breath, some people emit something the mozzies love others don't but I've never come across any hard evidence to support this...
    When I'm in the field, I get absolutely ravaged by mosquitoes. I've developed an intense hatred of them.
    What about other blood sucking insects? Do they also like how you taste more than other people.

    Fleas, ticks, biting flies and gnats, bed bugs ....etc...

    Just wondering, because when I visited someone who had cats, I saw fleas all over the place, but they pretty much left me alone, while biting the crap out some others.

    I'm sure things would have been very different had I been the only choice for those fleas.
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    I wonder if it simply comes down to who has an allergic reaction to the bites and who doesn't. The itching and swelling are usually the result of histamines. I am very allergic to most insect bites and will bear scars from bites for over a year sometimes. while my kids rarely even get a raised bump from a mosquito bite.

    If I take allergy medication before digging in with incessant scratching the bites fade sooner and usually without leaving a scar.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    I love bats, but I foresee a problem.

    Let's see....

    You find yourself inundated with mosquitoes. So you build a bat box and acquire some bats. They eat the mosquitoes. You run out of mosquitoes and bats fly away. Mosquitoes come back.

    ?
    In order to keep the bats close to home, would you be forced to then keep standing water around to attract the very insects you are trying to get rid of or else lose your method of ridding yourself of that insect.
    Often practices that are effective against germs and vermin become cultural fixtures though people don't know why - our rationalizations for these cultural practices have nothing to do with the actual function. I submit that pools of goldfish is one such. Mosquitoes like to invest their eggs in these ponds, but the chance of any larva attaining pupal size in this environment is slender to none. The fish may be fed meanwhile; they will always prefer a wriggling larva over floating pellets.



    Mosquitoes can see infrared but in in LED tests results are mixed. So they aren't attracted visually to warm bodies, as I'd once imagined. I'm a mosquito magnet and figured hot metabolism was to blame.



    The first bite of the season is usually the worst. This injects a cocktail of germs completely new to the immune system. The good news is that unless you're on a road trip, later bites you will have some immunity to - they won't swell or itch as much (unless you are allergic type). I've observed ranch toddlers who were getting bitten literally several times per minute, yet had acquired such immunity they never scratched, and bore no visible bumps. The bad news is that germs vary by species, water body, season; and some of these germs do much worse than an itchy bump.
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    some of these germs do much worse than an itchy bump
    Ross River virus, West Nile virus and various versions of encephalitis are no fun at all - sometimes lethal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    What about other blood sucking insects? Do they also like how you taste more than other people.

    Fleas, ticks, biting flies and gnats, bed bugs ....etc...

    Just wondering, because when I visited someone who had cats, I saw fleas all over the place, but they pretty much left me alone, while biting the crap out some others.

    I'm sure things would have been very different had I been the only choice for those fleas.
    I spend a lot of my time in the water, so I don't have much trouble with things like ticks. It's the flying bugs that can get my arms while I'm knee's-high in water that go for me.

    As for gnats, I didn't even know they could bite. And I've only ever been bitten by a fly once. It was a Big horsefly. That welted up like a bee sting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    What about other blood sucking insects? Do they also like how you taste more than other people.

    Fleas, ticks, biting flies and gnats, bed bugs ....etc...

    Just wondering, because when I visited someone who had cats, I saw fleas all over the place, but they pretty much left me alone, while biting the crap out some others.

    I'm sure things would have been very different had I been the only choice for those fleas.
    I spend a lot of my time in the water, so I don't have much trouble with things like ticks. It's the flying bugs that can get my arms while I'm knee's-high in water that go for me.

    As for gnats, I didn't even know they could bite. And I've only ever been bitten by a fly once. It was a Big horsefly. That welted up like a bee sting.
    Biting flies & gnats, you find those in the mountains during hot weather. I know what you experienced with that horse fly bite. Gnats are very small and you wouldn't expect them to bite, but they do, and it hurts. Being in water could have it's own biting hazards like leeches and biting water bugs. I've never seen a leech except on TV, but I've had a pool that had some water bugs in it, and they do bite.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Leeches, *shudder* I remember doing fieldwork in Danum Valley in Borneo, those bloodsucking bastards were everywhere...I did get bitten by those - and thereby became a member of the "Danum Valley Blood Donors"
    Borneo, from what I've seen on TV, I avoid places like that. Have you ever watched a program called "The Monsters inside Me", about very nasty parasite infections?
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    actually guys i am new on this forum. really i want to say thanks to all buddy for such a nice discussion. Really their is lot of to learn here.
    thanks
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    by the way picture uploaded was great .. i love to see mosquito to so close.
    thanks for the picture
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomFleming View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paramvir Jakhar View Post
    i am thinking to develop some thing different and more reliable and cost less technique to kill mosquito's. Now a day we use Mosquitos Bat (Basic principal is Electric shock...can harm the child or that is makes sound during process) poison Spray (very harmful for us) ...etc ..every method have limitation.
    What if the light in our home became the cause to kill mosquito or to repel them out side the house. is it possible to make such tube lights that emit such a light that will not harmful for other species instead of mosquito.
    Can we develop such a light emitting source that filter our surrounding from bacterias and harmful insect.
    I have given this a great deal of thought since my Dad was a "Malaria-Survivor" --- and recently invented a solar-powered outdoor lamp that "attracts" and kills mosquitoes. It is based on the science that an outdoor light attracts insects at night in the dark. Inside the lamp is a jar with organic material that is decomposing which gives off a vapor that kills mosquitoes. It is not instant. The female mosquito buzzes around the lamp, inhales a molecule or two of the vapor and flys off to die. You can see more information at "mosquito-genie" dot com --- feel free to click on all our tabs especially "How It Works". It is a patented product and really works. I spent five years in development because I wanted something for consumers that was natural and multi-functional. Most of the time you just think of it as a nice outdoor table lamp, but in about three weeks you will feel the difference. Cheers --- Tom
    method is good enough to take most of the mosquito out of the home. but i dont think so is is the ultimate solution. its a way to kill 80 percentage of mosquito and i think it is little expensive because to glow a big lamp we need lot of light more then all out or to burn mosquito coils.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    You could be right about that. I'd like to see any studies that have been done on this subject. I found a few choice pictures for everyone's enjoyment.


    i like this picture and remind me about that robot which is built to take DNA sample from human body. this smallest robot of the world.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    What about other blood sucking insects? Do they also like how you taste more than other people.

    Fleas, ticks, biting flies and gnats, bed bugs ....etc...

    Just wondering, because when I visited someone who had cats, I saw fleas all over the place, but they pretty much left me alone, while biting the crap out some others.

    I'm sure things would have been very different had I been the only choice for those fleas.
    I spend a lot of my time in the water, so I don't have much trouble with things like ticks. It's the flying bugs that can get my arms while I'm knee's-high in water that go for me.

    As for gnats, I didn't even know they could bite. And I've only ever been bitten by a fly once. It was a Big horsefly. That welted up like a bee sting.
    Biting flies & gnats, you find those in the mountains during hot weather. I know what you experienced with that horse fly bite. Gnats are very small and you wouldn't expect them to bite, but they do, and it hurts. Being in water could have it's own biting hazards like leeches and biting water bugs. I've never seen a leech except on TV, but I've had a pool that had some water bugs in it, and they do bite.
    Being as my work is typically in water quality, the water I'm in is usually...well, of poor quality. Because of that, I usually wear waders unless we're out on a boat. I've only ever had a leech on me once. You don't feel them at all and my bite didn't itch afterward.

    All the gnats (my term for flying insects tiny enough to be species indeterminate) I've seen have been little more than annoying clouds. Never really had a problem with them, thankfully.
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    Two ideas -

    One I got from some cheesy Sci Fi Book - how about finding the Resonant Frequency of a Mosquito or some major part of its Body - Assuming that you can find one which is NOT harmful to People or Nice Animals.
    Broadcast these at high enough intensity - Mosquitos go BANG !!

    OR - keep Frogs and Toads as Pets - they LOVE top Eat Mosquitos, and can catch them on the wing, with their sticky tongues.
    Conditions which favour Mosquitos - damp and warm. are also nice for some Frogs or Toads.
    BTW - I LIKE Frogs and Toads.

    Hell - I like most Creatures - except Flies and Mosquitos.
    Crane Flies - NEVER - I hate swarms of the damn things - their Legs wiggle whilst they fly.
    Crane Flies are nearly as bad as Stag Beetles - but I bet you do not get Stag Beetles in USA.
    If I wasn't so stupid - I might know what I was doing
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karakris View Post
    Two ideas -

    One I got from some cheesy Sci Fi Book - how about finding the Resonant Frequency of a Mosquito or some major part of its Body - Assuming that you can find one which is NOT harmful to People or Nice Animals.
    Broadcast these at high enough intensity - Mosquitoes go BANG !!

    OR - keep Frogs and Toads as Pets - they LOVE top Eat Mosquitoes, and can catch them on the wing, with their sticky tongues.
    Conditions which favor Mosquitoes - damp and warm. are also nice for some Frogs or Toads.
    BTW - I LIKE Frogs and Toads.

    Hell - I like most Creatures - except Flies and Mosquitoes.
    Crane Flies - NEVER - I hate swarms of the damn things - their Legs wiggle whilst they fly.
    Crane Flies are nearly as bad as Stag Beetles - but I bet you do not get Stag Beetles in USA.
    Stag Beetles, do they bite?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Karakris View Post
    One I got from some cheesy Sci Fi Book - how about finding the Resonant Frequency of a Mosquito or some major part of its Body - Assuming that you can find one which is NOT harmful to People or Nice Animals.
    Broadcast these at high enough intensity - Mosquitos go BANG !!
    Let's consider natural methods of control before we try unleashing hellfire.

    Quote Originally Posted by Karakris View Post
    OR - keep Frogs and Toads as Pets - they LOVE top Eat Mosquitos, and can catch them on the wing, with their sticky tongues.
    Conditions which favour Mosquitos - damp and warm. are also nice for some Frogs or Toads.
    BTW - I LIKE Frogs and Toads.
    Unfortunately, frogs and toads are extremely susceptible to environmental changes and many are being killed by parasitic fungi. They are declining world wide and, though I applaud any effort to bolster their numbers, I think it would be quite difficult to maintain a population.

    Quote Originally Posted by Karakris View Post
    Hell - I like most Creatures - except Flies and Mosquitos.
    Crane Flies - NEVER - I hate swarms of the damn things - their Legs wiggle whilst they fly.
    Crane Flies are nearly as bad as Stag Beetles - but I bet you do not get Stag Beetles in USA.
    Let's not start demonizing insects simply because we don't like the cut of their jib.

    All insects have their place. Even, and it pains me to say this, mosquitoes fit in. If their numbers are growing, it is because they lack a natural predator to keep them in check. If you can't reintroduce that predator, your best bet is just prevention. Clean out all standing water or places where they may breed. If you discover their larvae somewhere, clean it out and get rid of them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bad Robot View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Karakris View Post
    Two ideas -

    One I got from some cheesy Sci Fi Book - how about finding the Resonant Frequency of a Mosquito or some major part of its Body - Assuming that you can find one which is NOT harmful to People or Nice Animals.
    Broadcast these at high enough intensity - Mosquitoes go BANG !!

    OR - keep Frogs and Toads as Pets - they LOVE top Eat Mosquitoes, and can catch them on the wing, with their sticky tongues.
    Conditions which favor Mosquitoes - damp and warm. are also nice for some Frogs or Toads.
    BTW - I LIKE Frogs and Toads.

    Hell - I like most Creatures - except Flies and Mosquitoes.
    Crane Flies - NEVER - I hate swarms of the damn things - their Legs wiggle whilst they fly.
    Crane Flies are nearly as bad as Stag Beetles - but I bet you do not get Stag Beetles in USA.
    Stag Beetles, do they bite?
    They have BIG Pincers - about 8mm long - I guess they Do Bite, if threatened.
    If I wasn't so stupid - I might know what I was doing
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Like this bad boy (OK it's a rhinocerous beetle not a stag beetle but still...) we caught in Borneo when it knocked itself out flying into a hut...

    Attachment 2211


    Attachment 2212Attachment 2213
    A lot bigger than 8mm!

    (Sorry if the pictures aren't good but it was at the post campaign piss up and I'd had a few(!) drinks...)
    AYE - good Point - the Stag Beetles in England are not THAT Big.

    However - as "Foggy" always says, in "The Last of The Summer Wine" -
    Insects !! You don't call them Insects do you ? You should see the ones we had out in Malaya - the big ones could carry off a small child, and if you got bitten by one, they would take your arm off.
    If I wasn't so stupid - I might know what I was doing
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    Actually, you had some really great shots of a pole and a cup. I don't see the problem.

    Seriously cool insect, though. I've always wondered what it would be like to have one of THOSE whiz by my head. I assume you hear it coming, like a Chinook.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDemon View Post
    Those big ones tended to be quite good at staying out of the way, we only caught this one as it flew into the side of the hut. Made a sound like a rock hitting wood...
    lol so it was a party crasher huh? did you let it have a drink?
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    How many of you have tried to get to sleep with a mosquito in the room? When you are under the covers, the mosquito has to buzz around your head, so you can't help hearing that high pitched very distinctive buzz of a mosquito. Well I don't know about the rest of you, but getting to sleep with a little blood sucker buzzing you is impossible for me. So I have to get up turn on the light and hunt the little bugger down with extreme prejudice. I see it on the wall and I swat it, and it makes a blood stain on the wall. Well since I was the only one in the room, I knew without a doubt it was my blood on the wall and that stupid mosquito was trying for another shot of blood. After I got over being mad I got a good nights sleep.
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    mosquitos are attracted to carbon dioxide and certain frequencies of light. use that to your advantage.
    In the information age ignorance is a choice.
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    I've read that chewing tobacco can ward off mosquitoes? Could be handy in the field especially if all forms of tobacco work.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    I've read that chewing tobacco can ward off mosquitoes? Could be handy in the field especially if all forms of tobacco work.
    Nice smile, but then the mosquitoes don't care do they?
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    oh wow, maybe just wearing the tobacco in a pouch around on a string around your neck may work.
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    I have a great way of killing mosquitoes. It never tails. I take each one and tape it to a block of wood. I then take a hammer and smash it.

    Hey! Whatta ya want? It's late at night and I'm tipsy from the beer.
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    I experimented with yoga like mental techniques to avoid being biten. I was able to slowly walk shirtless across a sunlit meadow while in a light trance. However, I did not try it at twilight! I strongly suspect that the time of day and brightness of the sun hada lot to do with the lack of insect activity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    I experimented with yoga like mental techniques to avoid being biten. I was able to slowly walk shirtless across a sunlit meadow while in a light trance. However, I did not try it at twilight! I strongly suspect that the time of day and brightness of the sun hada lot to do with the lack of insect activity.
    You aren't one of them there sparkly vampires are you. Mosquitoes probably don't want old blood.
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    Quote Originally Posted by seagypsy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Sealeaf View Post
    I experimented with yoga like mental techniques to avoid being biten. I was able to slowly walk shirtless across a sunlit meadow while in a light trance. However, I did not try it at twilight! I strongly suspect that the time of day and brightness of the sun hada lot to do with the lack of insect activity.
    You aren't one of them there sparkly vampires are you. Mosquitoes probably don't want old blood.
    Second hand blood. Not my favorite either.
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