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Thread: If there exists only one body, can time pass?

  1. #201  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strange View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Therapy View Post
    I read all the post, if I do not understand what is written I should not ask even if it is not addresed to me? I did not think I was breaking the rules.
    Oh, all right. I'll let you in on the secret. Sssshh.

    Write4U posted something about a "vacuum singularity" which is not a term I am familiar with so I asked him what it meant.

    Does that make sense or do you need it in Japanese?
    Thanks for the tip.
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  2. #202  
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    Quote Originally Posted by shlunka View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmictraveler View Post
    A circadian rhythm (pron.: /sɜrˈkdiən/) is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and rhythms have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria. The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" (or "approximately"), and diem or dies, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Although circadian rhythms are endogenous ("built-in", self-sustained), they are adjusted (entrained) to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers, commonly the most important of which is daylight.


    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=circadian&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja &sqi=2&ved=0CC8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia .org%2Fwiki%2FCircadian_rhythm&ei=4IJfUYwbgvr1BI7G gIAK&usg=AFQjCNFF-gh_3dqjMCJ-SW2LDQyr8_IlvA
    Would the circadian rhythm be altered by a change in sunlight pattern? I.E, the month of darkness in the northern regions of Canada?
    It might be ignored if you take a somnolent perspective on it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somnolence
    Depression is the uncertainty of the unknown, I know one day I'll die so I'm happy.
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  3. #203  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RAJ_K View Post
    It is not useful to post more regarding this
    Correct.
    Because you will not, or cannot, support your assertion that "information exists physically in some form".
    Information always exists physically if it exists at all. Choose any form of information storage you want, you will inevitably find that some material object has to be in some particular state in order to store it. If it's in your brain, then some of the cells in your brain are in some particular state, or else you would immediately forget it.

    Quote Originally Posted by icewendigo View Post
    Speculation: What would happen is everything in the universe except one photon ceased to exist, what would happen with this photon?
    Interesting question. Probably this is the only situation where the OP would make any sense. An object with no substructure, all alone in the universe.

    Would time pass? I'm going to go with "no". The reason being because there is no "aether", so there's no absolute measure of distance or motion. Without a second object, any claim that the photon is "moving" makes no sense. Also any claim that it has a particular wavelength is meaningless, because there's nothing against which to measure "length".

    Quote Originally Posted by Therapy View Post

    The point I am making is this. The glass was filled with air when the air is emptied the glass is refilled with a vacuum, in that case empty is no longer relevant. How can the glass be filled with a vacuum and we say it has nothing in it? The way I posed the question might be a bit misleading but I have no other tool to explain. Can we say vacuum is nothing? Or can we say the glass is empty? At least its empty of air. What is emptiness, and what is the void? Do you see what I am saying?

    Filled with vacuum is as "empty" as anything can get.

    It's an interesting thought experiment to ask ourselves what a glass with nothing, not even vacuum would be like, but..... how would you remove the vacuum? There doesn't appear to be any such thing as any mechanism that could achieve that.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  4. #204  
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiki
    The quality of a partial vacuum refers to how closely it approaches a perfect vacuum. Other things equal, lower gas pressure means higher-quality vacuum. For example, a typical vacuum cleaner produces enough suction to reduce air pressure by around 20%. Much higher-quality vacuums are possible. Ultra-high vacuum chambers, common in chemistry, physics, and engineering, operate below one trillionth (10−12) of atmospheric pressure (100 nPa), and can reach around 100 particles/cm3. Outer space is an even higher-quality vacuum, with the equivalent of just a few hydrogen atoms per cubic meter on average. Some theories predict that even if all matter could be removed from a volume, it would still not be "empty" due to vacuum fluctuations, dark energy, and other phenomena in quantum physics. In modern particle physics, the vacuum state is considered as the ground state of matter.
    I'm guessing this is the basis of Therapy's objection.
    "Ok, brain let's get things straight. You don't like me, and I don't like you, so let's do this so I can go back to killing you with beer." - Homer
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  5. #205  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dywyddyr View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by RAJ_K View Post
    It is not useful to post more regarding this
    Correct.
    Because you will not, or cannot, support your assertion that "information exists physically in some form".
    Information always exists physically if it exists at all. Choose any form of information storage you want, you will inevitably find that some material object has to be in some particular state in order to store it. If it's in your brain, then some of the cells in your brain are in some particular state, or else you would immediately forget it.
    Good Logic
    "No law of Physics is surprising & can not beat commonsense until it does not give enough explanation logically or I did not understand it rightly or simply it is wrong "
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