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Thread: A smoke test can someone explained what I sore?

  1. #1 A smoke test can someone explained what I sore? 
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    Ok, today I noticed the sun was shining bright through my window and decided to run an experiment.

    I sealed my room and filled my room full of smoke. Several cigarettes later I had enough smoke to see beams of light and dust particles.

    Firstly I tried to catch a piece of dust with my finger, this was impossible it repelled away from my finger, vertical and horizontal movement away from my finger.

    Secondly I noticed that dust raised and lowered in the atmosphere been of a buoyant nature, like it was riding a wave.

    Thirdly I was looking at the photon beams of light, and how objects in my window created an extended shadow to my eyes, this was not in the normal viewing off how we see shadows.

    I sore this is like a dimmer switch, the objects density blocking the charge.

    You see shadows as just a shadow, I see shadows as starved energy light....


    So question.

    My finger, this was giving off a negative charge?

    Dust, doe's this bounce on the waves and frequency of light?

    Smoke ,again, strange movement, what is smoke? some parts of the smoke seemed to be highlighted with an outer glow?


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  3. #2  
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    Howv sore are you?


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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    My finger, this was giving off a negative charge?
    No, your finger was disturbing the air around it, which moved the dust particle.

    Heat also causes movement of air. The Sun coming in through the window will have an affect on the air, causing movement of the dust particles that is different to the movements in the areas in shade or shadow.

    Heat can cause upwards movement of air.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fizzlooney View Post
    Howv sore are you?
    It should of been seen?, apologies.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    My finger, this was giving off a negative charge?
    No, your finger was disturbing the air around it, which moved the dust particle.

    Arrr, I see.....

    Heat also causes movement of air. The Sun coming in through the window will have an affect on the air, causing movement of the dust particles that is different to the movements in the areas in shade or shadow.

    Heat can cause upwards movement of air.
    Heat causes air to rise?
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek
    Heat can cause upwards movement of air.
    Heat causes air to rise?
    Hot air balloon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  8. #7  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
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    Yes. Heat expands the air which becomes less dense. Lower density air floats upwards. Convection is one the three traditional modes of heat transmission.
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    In all likelyhood, the reason you couldn't grasp the particulates was more to do with the disruption of the air as your fingers travelled through it. Had you held out your hand, the particulate matter would have settled upon it.

    Second, atmospheric particulates do interfere with EM radiation passing through them. It's called Mie scattering and accounts for changes in the color of the sky during something like a volcanic eruption or large fire.

    Finally, the smoke you were breathing in (which I don't recommend) is simply burned matter. In cigarettes, there are quite a large number of chemicals and particulates that you're breathing in both directly through the cigarette and indirectly through the smoke from the other end. None of it is good for you.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    In all likelyhood, the reason you couldn't grasp the particulates was more to do with the disruption of the air as your fingers travelled through it. Had you held out your hand, the particulate matter would have settled upon it.

    Second, atmospheric particulates do interfere with EM radiation passing through them. It's called Mie scattering and accounts for changes in the color of the sky during something like a volcanic eruption or large fire.

    Finally, the smoke you were breathing in (which I don't recommend) is simply burned matter. In cigarettes, there are quite a large number of chemicals and particulates that you're breathing in both directly through the cigarette and indirectly through the smoke from the other end. None of it is good for you.

    Ok, so EM waves are constant from the Sun?, our ozone layer blocks some of the stream frequency, mainly gamma rays.

    We see different colors in the sky because of build up of different particles, gases, that filter the wave lengths. Do our man made wavelengths effect the suns EM?

    Can we not make an anti wavelength to emit to stop the gamma wavelength?
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Ok, so EM waves are constant from the Sun?, our ozone layer blocks some of the stream frequency, mainly gamma rays.

    We see different colors in the sky because of build up of different particles, gases, that filter the wave lengths. Do our man made wavelengths effect the suns EM?

    Can we not make an anti wavelength to emit to stop the gamma wavelength?
    I'm not sure why gamma rays entered into this. The primary radiation absorbed by our atmosphere is not gamma radiation, either.

    Next, I don't know what you mean by man-made wavelengths. Do you mean light we put off from street lamps and such? The scattering is caused by gasses and liquids in the atmosphere, not other wavelengths of energy. There isn't anything called an anti-wavelength that I am aware of. Under certain conditions, say in a prism, wavelengths of light can be bent and scattered as to appear a different color, but one does not reflect another.

    There is also a difference between Mie and Rayleigh scattering in atmospheric conditions.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Identical threads merged.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

    "Gullibility kills" - Carl Sagan
    "All people know the same truth. Our lives consist of how we chose to distort it." - Harry Block
    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." - Aristotle
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Yes. Heat expands the air which becomes less dense. Lower density air floats upwards. Convection is one the three traditional modes of heat transmission.
    So could we consider that air is made of molecules, so it is the molecules that expand, a molecule is made of atoms, so the atom expands with more heat?

    Do other elements rise with heat such as gases...?
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER View Post
    Identical threads merged.
    Thank you, it double posted, I apologize.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk421 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek
    Heat can cause upwards movement of air.
    Heat causes air to rise?
    Hot air balloon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Thank you for the link.
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  16. #15  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Yes. Heat expands the air which becomes less dense. Lower density air floats upwards. Convection is one the three traditional modes of heat transmission.
    So could we consider that air is made of molecules, so it is the molecules that expand, a molecule is made of atoms, so the atom expands with more heat?

    Do other elements rise with heat such as gases...?
    No. A molecule which is given more heat has an increased kinetic energy and its movement becomes more energetic. The atom itself does not change.

    Heat itself does not cause elements to rise upward. Hot air rises in pockets as it becomes less dense and is displaced by colder air. Things caught in this updraft can rise (some birds can essentially hover on these updrafts as they hunt and most birds take advantage of them to conserve their own energy).
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Ok, so EM waves are constant from the Sun?, our ozone layer blocks some of the stream frequency, mainly gamma rays.

    We see different colors in the sky because of build up of different particles, gases, that filter the wave lengths. Do our man made wavelengths effect the suns EM?

    Can we not make an anti wavelength to emit to stop the gamma wavelength?
    I'm not sure why gamma rays entered into this. The primary radiation absorbed by our atmosphere is not gamma radiation, either.

    Next, I don't know what you mean by man-made wavelengths. Do you mean light we put off from street lamps and such? The scattering is caused by gasses and liquids in the atmosphere, not other wavelengths of energy. There isn't anything called an anti-wavelength that I am aware of. Under certain conditions, say in a prism, wavelengths of light can be bent and scattered as to appear a different color, but one does not reflect another.

    There is also a difference between Mie and Rayleigh scattering in atmospheric conditions.
    I mean by man made wave lengths , radio waves, microwaves, etc, we create a network of twisted waves...

    Is the main absorbed radiation UV?

    Yes I did the see the scattering of gases and liquids as the Mie scattering, but I see these also filtering waves, and that is why we see different colors in the sky, but unlike a prism rather than splitting the waves, filters the waves.

    Is the rayleigh scattering in our outer atmosphere, into space?

    Either way infra red radiation, we release a lot of this?...... is that why we can use IR at night because we make it?

    Sorry if I am confusing again..
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by theorist View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt View Post
    Yes. Heat expands the air which becomes less dense. Lower density air floats upwards. Convection is one the three traditional modes of heat transmission.
    So could we consider that air is made of molecules, so it is the molecules that expand, a molecule is made of atoms, so the atom expands with more heat?

    Do other elements rise with heat such as gases...?

    No. A molecule which is given more heat has an increased kinetic energy and its movement becomes more energetic. The atom itself does not change.

    Heat itself does not cause elements to rise upward. Hot air rises in pockets as it becomes less dense and is displaced by colder air. Things caught in this updraft can rise (some birds can essentially hover on these updrafts as they hunt and most birds take advantage of them to conserve their own energy).
    So a molecule gains greater kinetic energy when introduced to heat. It,s movement becomes more energetic.....

    That doe's still not explain why it would rise against gravity......I drive a car and have more kinetic energy but my car doe's not fly off into the sky.

    Kinetic energy making a negative charge maybe, so the less density can be easily lifted by the negative emission of electromagnetism from the earth , a slightly stronger force than gravity?
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  19. #18  
    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    It doesn't really rise against gravity. Gravity has little effect on a gas molecule. It rises because a molecule with greater kinetic energy creates more space between the other gas molecules in that same pocket. This causes that warm pocket to become less dense than the surrounding atmosphre and, thus, rise. When the temperature in that warm pocket reaches the same temperature as the surrounding air as it rises and cools, it will eventually fall back to a level where it has similar buoyancy.

    I have no idea why you're comparing kinetic energy and charges, nor how you think EM radiation factors into this.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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    I have no idea why you're comparing kinetic energy and charges, nor how you think EM radiation factors into this.[/QUOTE]

    I am not 100% sure myself, I just see something,it comes ,then it goes, and i have to try to work it out what i mean myself at times.

    I do not think the gas molecule's rises because it creates more space in the pocket, what fills that space?.

    I think the electron becomes more excited creating more negative charge.

    I see EM waves been on like a conduit of molecules, gases, along with all waves...

    OUr atmosphere is made entirely of gases of some description, so it is full to the brim of molecules, so there is no room for anything else, unless the waves travel through the molecules as a conduit.
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    Life-Size Nanoputian Flick Montana's Avatar
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    Heat, in no way, alters the charge of the molecule unless that heat is involved in some kind of redox reaction or causes a leaving group to walk off with an electron.

    Increasing the energy of a system causes the molecules to move around faster, bouncing off one another and creating space (increased collisions are also one reasons heat increases rxns among molecules). As that empty space fills with rapidly moving molecules, the density of that system decreases. This means the system, if not contained, will increase in volume and rise through more dense air.

    You're applying forces and interactions to a process which is not governed by those forces and interactions. Step one for you should be to understand which forces apply under given conditions.
    "Sometimes I think the surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that none of it has tried to contact us." -Calvin
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  22. #21  
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    molicule.JPG
    Quote Originally Posted by Flick Montana View Post
    Heat, in no way, alters the charge of the molecule unless that heat is involved in some kind of redox reaction or causes a leaving group to walk off with an electron.

    Increasing the energy of a system causes the molecules to move around faster, bouncing off one another and creating space (increased collisions are also one reasons heat increases rxns among molecules). As that empty space fills with rapidly moving molecules, the density of that system decreases. This means the system, if not contained, will increase in volume and rise through more dense air.

    You're applying forces and interactions to a process which is not governed by those forces and interactions. Step one for you should be to understand which forces apply under given conditions.
    Thank you Flick and I will try to understand what is governed by what..However I can not see where the space comes from for movement of any sort.

    How can the molecule move when it is refined to its own space by other molecules ..?

    There would be no space to move only a ....I do not know the word I will draw a picture for the movement picture..

    The circular area in the picture represent the atmosphere.

    The squares in the middle represent gases but as a molecule state, molecules connect to molecules via there negative electron connection to make a circuit with other molecules.

    Although a very weak circuit.

    So think now instead of a joining molecule to a molecule, a joining mass of different molecules, similar to a patch work quilt. Each patch representing a different gas.

    So then as in my picture they are all joined together, there is no room for movement...

    They would have to push as one unit and not an individual molecule to move other gases out the way.

    I can see our planet as a greenhouse, the different layers of gases been our filter.
    We push needed gases out of the atmosphere into space, as we create heat ourselves..

    Heat making the gases rise and changing the balance of the filter.

    And yes I do apologize I am ranting again and will try to slow down and remember and not speculate although some of this I do see as sense.
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