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Thread: Limit of Gravity?

  1. #1 Limit of Gravity? 
    Ascended Member Ascended's Avatar
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    Could there be a maximum limit for gravity?, I given their is a maximum temperature and speed, there seems to be limits beyond which it is impossible to cross, also when I come to think about it how about also for magnatism? Perhaps a point at which these forces even start to behave differently maybe?


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    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    The only limit gravity can have is only possible if there is a limit in mass.(matter) stars become much denser and eventully collapse into a black hole..the thing is,it does'nt ends here. Any matter that falls into it,adds to its mass which eventually increases its gravity. So you see, limitless mass means limitless gravity.


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    Quote Originally Posted by merumario View Post
    The only limit gravity can have is only possible if there is a limit in mass.(matter) stars become much denser and eventully collapse into a black hole..the thing is,it does'nt ends here. Any matter that falls into it,adds to its mass which eventually increases its gravity. So you see, limitless mass means limitless gravity.
    Thanks thats really interesting, I had just been wondering about gravity and a possible upper limit when thinking about the idea of how spacetime distortion appear to create gravity but only to a finite limit, because the distortion can only extend so far. But then I get a bit confused by the idea of a gravitational constant that seems to suggest that regardless of whether the maximum distortion has already been reached, extra mass will still produce extra gravity so I wondered if at these limits there could be special conditions that may help resolve this possible contradiction. But I have to admit I don't really understand it well enough to well, understand.
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    There is a threshold where gravity is a curvature of space back on to itself. That is where the event horizon of a black hole is. Literally every path beyond the horizon brings you closer to the centre. Of course, the closer you get to the centre, the larger still the escape velocity gets. As you add mass to the black hole, the event horizon where the escape velocity equals the speed of light and where space curves all the way back on to itself gets further and further away from the centre. In any case, theoretically the intensity of the gravitational field is determined through an inverse square relation, so it could reach into extreme numbers at extreme proximity to the source. I don't think it has been fully resolved exactly what happens at that scales. I think it might be where quantum gravity tries to provide answers. There aren't any clear ones yet though.
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    Just another thought here but would there be a theoretical limit on the gravitational effect that a black hole could have on another object, by this I mean that no matter how strong the gravity field that actual effect upon an object is still somehow limited because it can never accelerate that object beyond C?


    Could there be something like a 'gravity saturation point' at which no matter how much more gravity interacts with an object it would no longer have any further effect?
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    Forum Ph.D. merumario's Avatar
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    In your process of finding answers,bear it in mind that in the current theory of gravity states that the world line is bended towards the larger mass.
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    Once gravity is intense enough to create an event horizon, that's as strong as it can get. After that point, adding mass or energy doesn't result in a more intense field, but in a larger event horizon.
    Its the way nature is!
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    To another universe, where the rules are simpler
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    Could there be a maximum limit for gravity?, I given their is a maximum temperature and speed, there seems to be limits beyond which it is impossible to cross, also when I come to think about it how about also for magnatism? Perhaps a point at which these forces even start to behave differently maybe?
    Theoretically there is a maximum energy that matter can reach in terms of temperature; the Planck Temperature. If you were to take that number and use its mass equivalence it might be speculative that that number is the most massive something can get. But it of course depends on how concentrated this mass is in the magnitude and direction of the dimension it occupies, and that nothing can be more massive.

    In other words you could theoretically say that the most mass possible is the mass equivalent to the Planck Temperature, and that this mass' radius is no wider than a Planck Length, if you could calculate the gravitational exertion of such an object then you might possibly have the theoretical strongest gravitational field, in essence; the limit of gravity. This is purley lateral thinking of course. The universe for instance has more mass/energy equivalence overall than the Planck temperature of one object so if you classed the universe itself as an object then you will have more than this Planck Temperature or 'Planck mass' if you were of the one object.
    "If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe". - Carl Sagan
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