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Thread: question about: laser fusion to propel spacecraft

  1. #1 question about: laser fusion to propel spacecraft 
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    fusionOrion2.jpg
    There is a cone shaped deuterium vessel with a rounded bottom facing the ship, and with extra reinforcement along the walls of the vessel (black lines in the picture). Laser beams (red arrows in the picture) are then used against the bottom in a very short pulse, like in regular laser fusion (Inertial confinement fusion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia).

    My question is if it's possible to get enough compression to achieve ignition if the deuterium vessel is shaped in this kind of shape? Or maybe there is some other possible shape that can be ignited from lasers on the ship?

    A second question is if it's possible to improve the yield of the fusion explosion by adding a mantle of deuterium around the part facing away from the lasers, without having to increase the power of the lasers?

    The reason for these questions are that I was thinking about ways that laser fusion could be combined with Orion (Project Orion (nuclear propulsion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
    to make a smaller (cheaper) and safer spaceship. BTW the pusher plate is attached to shock absorbers, and the motion that the shock absorbers make during every explosion can probably be used to make electricity for the lasers.
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  3. #2  
    Time Lord
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    Interesting idea. However, I must ask: If the laser is powerful enough to create fusion-level heat, then what would prevent it from cutting through the rest of the rocket?


    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6742boom ([URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Orion_%28nuclear_propulsion%29"
    Project Orion (nuclear propulsion) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/URL])
    herrmm.
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    1 Ugly MoFo warthog213's Avatar
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    It would seem to me that a proper and efficent way to propel an object through space is to change it's polarity so it's drawn towards another object or in another direction. The laws of space says that mass must be dissapated from an object in order to push it. I say that what needs to be done is the opposite. Pull an object towards something instead of pushing it. Pushing an object takes way to much fuel and can't hardly be loaded or carried to a craft in any sense. Where pulling an object will cause it to travel faster and faster due to the factors of inertia. And would require the production of an electrical source. Now if lasers would push a craft inertia would work the same for that too. But I say no due to light particles travel through space far to easy to have enough push factor to work very well....
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  6. #5  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by warthog213 View Post
    It would seem to me that a proper and efficent way to propel an object through space is to change it's polarity so it's drawn towards another object or in another direction.
    Polarity of what. Magnetism? Electric charge? What would it be drawn to?

    The laws of space says that mass must be dissapated from an object in order to push it.

    Where did you get that from?

    I say that what needs to be done is the opposite. Pull an object towards something instead of pushing it. Pushing an object takes way to much fuel and can't hardly be loaded or carried to a craft in any sense. Where pulling an object will cause it to travel faster and faster due to the factors of inertia.
    Inertia would have nothing to do with it. Strange physics in your universe!

    And would require the production of an electrical source.
    Why?

    Now if lasers would push a craft inertia would work the same for that too. But I say no due to light particles travel through space far to easy to have enough push factor to work very well....
    That's such nonsense, I can't decode it.
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  7. #6  
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    The cone shaped deuterium thing is shot out at the backside of the ship (the side with the pusher plate), and the deuterium thing is shot at with a strong lasers that hopefully initiates a fusion explosion. The shock wave from the explosion hits the pusher plate and accelerates the spacecraft.

    The laser is mounted somewhere on the spacecraft and is only directed at the deuterium thing, so the spacecraft is not hit with the laser. So the "only" thing the spacecraft has to endure is the shock wave from the explosion.
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