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Thread: Leaping Leptons!

  1. #1 Leaping Leptons! 
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    My questions are about leptons and their associated antileptons.

    Do antileptons appear on earth? Do quarks similarly have anti particles?

    Do Leptons and Antileptons commonly interact? If so what is the result?

    When I talk about Antileptons am I really talking about antimatter?

    Thanks much

    W


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  3. #2  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Positrons (anti-electrons) certainly occur naturally (i.e. on earth) as a result of certain types of beta decay.

    If an electron and positron interact then the annihilate generating gamma radiation - this is the basis of positron emission tomography (PET) scans.

    Antiquarks exist and occur in certain types of hadrons such as mesons (and, of course, in anti-hadrons such anti-protons and anti-neutrons). Free quarks or anti-quarks don't occur anywhere, as far as we know.

    Antileptons are, effectively, antimatter. Personally, I would reserve "antimatter" for whole atoms made up of antielectrons, antiprotons and antineutrons. One of the teams at the LHC is trying to make enough anti-hydrogen to measure its properties (which should be identical to hydrogen).

    Let us know if there are any specific areas you need more help with!

    See the following for more detail:
    Positron emission - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Positron emission tomography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Hadron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Antimatter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Last edited by Strange; March 26th, 2012 at 12:11 PM. Reason: to make it a bit more forum-like :-)
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  4. #3  
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    Strange - you are persisting in the very behaviour I was complaining about yesterday. If you know how to answer a question, then do it in your own words, otherwise stay silent. Obviously you have not broken any "rules"

    I state my case again: If a questioner is too lazy to look, in this case, on Wikipedia, then let them stew.

    Ya know it also reflects very badly on you. It might cause one to suspect that you cannot answer the question off your own bat, or that you are too lazy to do so.

    As I said before, this is collectively your forum, and if you are content to let it be an exchange of hypertext links, so be it.

    But it will cease to interest me
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  5. #4  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guitarist View Post
    Strange - you are persisting in the very behaviour I was complaining about yesterday.
    Sorry, I didn't see your complaint. I wrote the answers first and then went and looked up the Wikipedia links as references for further info (feel free not to believe that ). I have just seen wraithedge's introductory post, which made me realise they were rather redundant as he has already taken that route.

    I wasn't sure how much detail the OP wanted so thought I would try and get the ball rolling.
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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  6. #5  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    To up the interestingness level, you might also be interested in "muonium", which is a sort of atom consisting of an electron orbiting (1) an antimuon (rather than a proton). They are very short lived but their chemistry has been investigated. There are various other "exotic atoms" such as positronium, a positron and an electron.

    (1) They don't actually "orbit" of course, at least not in the old Rutherford model sense.
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    Thanks so much Strange, Those links will give me a boost and the positron emission tomography lead was a great catch. I had no idea. Looking at the decay type will help as well. I admit to being a rough savage in the area of particle physics so this helps turn a confusing collection of facts into a path with a starting point.

    Thanks again.

    W
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  8. #7  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Re. antimatter, you might be interested in this story on the CERN group looking at the properties of anti-hydrogen: Inside CERN's antimatter lab - physics-math - 29 March 2012 - New Scientist
    ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, non qui negat
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