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Thread: Would it be Possible to Make Deuterium Oxide Ice?

  1. #1 Would it be Possible to Make Deuterium Oxide Ice? 
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    Ultra-dense Deuterium May Be Nuclear Fuel Of The Future


    There are quite a few articles about this "highly condensed deuterium" to be found in cyberspace. I'm not certain I've fully digested the process for making miniscule amounts of the stuff, but it renders the question in my mind, "Could we produce D2O ice?" We have seen that supercooled water undergoes a series of expansion and contraction phases at various temperatures, but what about supercooled and compressed D20? It would seem this might be a better approach to a fuel if somehow the resulting substance could be locked in both physical and thermodynamic equilibrium. The quantum oscillations produced would certainly be capable of generating electrical power. Suppose we layered it between conductors like a capacitor or even a Russian Doll?

    Any thoughts?


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    From the article:
    The laser technology has long been tested on frozen deuterium, known as “deuterium ice”, but results have been poor. It has proved to be very difficult to compress the deuterium ice sufficiently for it to attain the high temperature required to ignite the fusion.


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    Yes. That is the article.

    Do you believe by deuterium ice they were meaning deuterium oxide ice? I suppose what I'm imagining is a tunneling, diamond anvil as an alternative to the laser, only not with the idea of fusing but to create a superconducter, effectively sintered by supercooling as opposed to a kiln. It would seem that if we could stabilize the deuterium with Na in a supercooled state, they would oppose one another with endothermal and exothermal characteristics and oscillate against a container of some higher mass metal. In the process of making the stuff, we would be supplying the equivalent energy of sintering through the compression bby the anvil, The B part of the mold would be supercooled, as in A is a lower anvil, B is the center, or core, and C is an upper anvil.

    Once again, this is a question for technical opinion. Is any of that sounding do-able?
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    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post
    Yes. That is the article.

    Do you believe by deuterium ice they were meaning deuterium oxide ice?
    No. Deuterium oxide is more commonly known as heavy water. If this is what they meant, they would have referred to it as "heavy water ice".
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post
    Yes. That is the article.

    Do you believe by deuterium ice they were meaning deuterium oxide ice?
    No. Deuterium oxide is more commonly known as heavy water. If this is what they meant, they would have referred to it as "heavy water ice".
    And should be the obvious reason for the question to begin with. This is a source of confusion ion some circles. When deuterium ice is mentioned, it would have to be deuterium laden ice to be ice at all. It seems the article is using ice as a misnomer. I was wanting to see if others interpretted it this way or not.

    It will be interesting to see how many agree.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post
    When deuterium ice is mentioned, it would have to be deuterium laden ice to be ice at all. It seems the article is using ice as a misnomer.
    The solid form of many volatiles, including Hydrogen(of which deuterium is an isotope), are also called an "ice". Frozen Carbon Dioxide or "dry ice" is a common example. The use of the word ice is not a misnomer.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by HectorDecimal View Post
    When deuterium ice is mentioned, it would have to be deuterium laden ice to be ice at all. It seems the article is using ice as a misnomer.
    The solid form of many volatiles, including Hydrogen(of which deuterium is an isotope), are also called an "ice". Frozen Carbon Dioxide or "dry ice" is a common example. The use of the word ice is not a misnomer.
    You're right. I didn't think of that.
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    HectorDecimal likes this.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arthur Angler View Post
    Thank you!

    Yes. It IS cool. No pun intended!

    It's amazing how one search brings up certain things while someone else can change things just a bit and Voila!
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