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Thread: Pressure at points on the same horizontal plane

  1. #1 Pressure at points on the same horizontal plane 
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    As you know,pressure is the same at points on the same horizontal plane
    Okay,suppose two points A,B in a fluid are on the same horizontal plane

    the pressure on both points is the same
    but at A pressure=h2*ρg
    pressure at B=h1ρg
    and h1 is not equal to h2 as you see
    could you explain this


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    Quote Originally Posted by Misr View Post
    but at A pressure=h2*ρg
    No, it isn't. It is h2*ρg plus the gage static pressure at h2. Since h2 is not exposed to the atmosphere, the gage pressure at that point is not zero, it is ρg*(h1-h2).


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    What is the gage static pressure?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misr View Post
    What is the gage static pressure?
    Gage pressure is the pressure you would measure with a pressure gage (or gauge) which is connected between the tank contents and the outside air, as opposed to the absolute pressure. Absolute pressure would be the gage pressure plus the air pressure. Static pressure just means there is no flow in the system.
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