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Thread: what effects would we expect to see at absolute zero?

  1. #1 what effects would we expect to see at absolute zero? 
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
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    I know its theoretically impossible to reach 0kelvin, but if we were to pretend it had been achieved, is there any phenomenons predicted to happen?

    another question on the topic that has me a bit confused. 0 kelvin is -273.15c, where does the .15 fit into the kelvin scale? eg 0 kelvin must be -273.15 (most accurate measurement I'm aware of) so does that make 1 kelvin -273.15 or -273.00?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    The .15 is just because of where the 0 and 100 point of the Celsius scale was set. The Kelvin scale was made so that 0 was absolute 0, but 1 degree Kelvin is the same range as 1 degree Celsius. (So 1 Kelvin is -272.15 Celsius).


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  4. #3  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster
    The .15 is just because of where the 0 and 100 point of the Celsius scale was set. The Kelvin scale was made so that 0 was absolute 0, but 1 degree Kelvin is the same range as 1 degree Celsius. (So 1 Kelvin is -272.15 Celsius).
    Ok, I see, and just to clarify, this also means that 273 kelvins is -0.15c?
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  5. #4  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Right. Kelvin's just Celsius shifted so 0 is absolute 0. If you're curious Rankine is the same done with Fahrenheit, though it's rarely used as far as I know.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster
    Right. Kelvin's just Celsius shifted so 0 is absolute 0. If you're curious Rankine is the same done with Fahrenheit, though it's rarely used as far as I know.
    Wow, why have I never even heard of rankine :O. Thank you
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  7. #6  
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    to answer the OP;

    0 kelvin means absolutely no motion. atoms stop vibrating, nuclei stop moving, electrons stop moving. the force of attraction between the electrons and nucleus cause the electrons to then move towards the nucleus, the state of no motion is instantly lost.

    extracting more energy from the system in an attempt to reach 0 kelvin results in a shrinking of the electron cloud around the nucleus, and this results in a lower radius for the atom, and a smaller macroscopic substance which is being cooled. theoretically in order to acheive 0 kelvin one will end up shrinking the atom or atoms indefinitely
    physics: accurate, objective, boring
    chemistry: accurate if physics is accurate, slightly subjective, you can blow stuff up
    biology: accurate if chemistry is accurate, somewhat subjective, fascinating
    religion: accurate if people are always right, highly subjective, bewildering
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  8. #7  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saul
    to answer the OP;

    0 kelvin means absolutely no motion. atoms stop vibrating, nuclei stop moving, electrons stop moving. the force of attraction between the electrons and nucleus cause the electrons to then move towards the nucleus, the state of no motion is instantly lost.

    extracting more energy from the system in an attempt to reach 0 kelvin results in a shrinking of the electron cloud around the nucleus, and this results in a lower radius for the atom, and a smaller macroscopic substance which is being cooled. theoretically in order to acheive 0 kelvin one will end up shrinking the atom or atoms indefinitely
    Thank you, I had never heard about the shrinking thing, though I might mention (missing citation) that absolute zero is not ACTUALLY a complete stand still, it is just commonly simplified in this way.
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  9. #8  
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    No, actually it is.
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  10. #9  
    Forum Sophomore somfooleishfool's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MeteorWayne
    No, actually it is.
    :O I've been lied to, no fair. And it would appear you are correct as I cant find any citation to my claim on google. Damn my highschool teachers strange sence of humour
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