Notices
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: invisibility

  1. #1 invisibility 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    delhi
    Posts
    5
    i have an idea to make anything invisible upto some extent apparently.
    a cube can be made using screens and cameras having 3d technology.screens are used as faces of the cube facing outward .each screen should have camera (of minimum size )be installed at a suitable position.now camera on a face should show image(exact image of the object which are covered due to the cube not image of larger field of view)
    on the face just opposite to it.in this way all the objects which get opaqued as seen along each face. now when a object is placed inside it it get apparently invisible.it just produce the image as anything is seen through a glass. the 3d tecnology should be must.but there are some disrepancies image should not be viewed along the edges.

    i wanna know if it can be possible or not?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    2
    Hey jay,

    I am not quit sure what you are proposing may work. 3-D technology has an optical range,for lack of a better word, doesn't it? I mean, how would a person looking on an angle to that cube be able to take advantage of the image displayed? Currently, at least with my experience, the 3-D technology must have the user looking perpendicular to the screen which is projecting the two images.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 discussion 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    delhi
    Posts
    5
    i am agree with you but i wanna know then what's the significance of 3-d if you can't see all the three dimension ? :?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4 Re: discussion 
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,070
    Quote Originally Posted by jayshankar
    i am agree with you but i wanna know then what's the significance of 3-d if you can't see all the three dimension ? :?
    Typical 3-D imaging creates the illusion of depth perception by creating a stereoscopic image for your eyes. Depth perception is due to the fact that our eyes, being slightly separated see the world from slightly different viewpoints. Our brains combine these viewpoints to give us the perception of distance.

    3-D imaging uses a method by which the camera records two separate images, like your eyes do, and then the glasses you wear are designed so that each of your eyes only sees the proper image. This fools your brain into thinking the it is seeing a 3-D image.

    The drawback is that you are limited to what the original camera saw. Anything that was hidden by a foreground object in the camera shot will always remain hidden to you.

    You can see this by the following simple experiment:

    While viewing a 3-D image move your head from one side to the other, try to see around a foreground object. You will fine that you can't. The foreground object will always shift to block your view of anything that was originally. behind it.

    The only way around this is to use holograms. Unlike other 3-D imaging techniques, holography can record a scene in a way that produces a true 3-D image. You can look look around objects an view them from different angles. Holography has not however progressed to to the point where the images look real life enough to fool people into thing that they are looking at an real object.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Re: discussion 
    Forum Bachelors Degree Waveman28's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    417
    Quote Originally Posted by Janus
    Quote Originally Posted by jayshankar
    i am agree with you but i wanna know then what's the significance of 3-d if you can't see all the three dimension ? :?
    Typical 3-D imaging creates the illusion of depth perception by creating a stereoscopic image for your eyes. Depth perception is due to the fact that our eyes, being slightly separated see the world from slightly different viewpoints. Our brains combine these viewpoints to give us the perception of distance.

    3-D imaging uses a method by which the camera records two separate images, like your eyes do, and then the glasses you wear are designed so that each of your eyes only sees the proper image. This fools your brain into thinking the it is seeing a 3-D image.

    The drawback is that you are limited to what the original camera saw. Anything that was hidden by a foreground object in the camera shot will always remain hidden to you.

    You can see this by the following simple experiment:

    While viewing a 3-D image move your head from one side to the other, try to see around a foreground object. You will fine that you can't. The foreground object will always shift to block your view of anything that was originally. behind it.

    The only way around this is to use holograms. Unlike other 3-D imaging techniques, holography can record a scene in a way that produces a true 3-D image. You can look look around objects an view them from different angles. Holography has not however progressed to to the point where the images look real life enough to fool people into thing that they are looking at an real object.
    Also, for true 3d imagery, see "head tracking".

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jd3-eiid-Uw
    "Doubt is the origin of Wisdom" - Rene Descartes
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    delhi
    Posts
    5
    hello whak! yes ;you are absolutely right in saying that it can't be viewed along the edges or corners which i had already written in my first quote .
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •