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Thread: Does the universe have more matter than antimatter?

  1. #1 Does the universe have more matter than antimatter? 
    Forum Sophomore Alex-The Great's Avatar
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    ??????????? :?


    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."
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  3. #2 Re: Does the universe have more matter than antimatter? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex-The Great
    ??????????? :?
    yes


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  4. #3 Re: Does the universe have more matter than antimatter? 
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    n WHY??????????? :?
    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."
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  5. #4 Re: Does the universe have more matter than antimatter? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex-The Great
    n WHY??????????? :?
    broken CP symmetry
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  6. #5  
    Forum Sophomore Alex-The Great's Avatar
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    oh...forgot it
    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."
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  7. #6  
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    I wouldn't state it with such certainty DrR, although it is the only plausable explanation ... so far.

    The weak force exibits parity and CP variance, and I assume that leads to its ability to switch quark flavours. But from everything I've read, it doesn' t give nearly enough excess matter over antimatter at the crucial tme after the big bang to account for the present day ratio of matter to radiation.

    The explanation for the dominance of matter ( and absence of anti-matter ) is probably still a work in progress.
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  8. #7  
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    I wouldn't state it with such certainty DrR
    I agree.

    It is theorized that there is more matter, yes.

    The last shuttle is supposed to do some experiment to detect antimatter, and it's abundance.

    An antimatter galaxy would appear the same to us as a matter galaxy.

    We can detect where matter and antimatter meet, but varying cosmological models would or would not have them "meet".

    Notice that the periodic table of elements has been updated to include antimatter.
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  9. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MigL
    I wouldn't state it with such certainty DrR, although it is the only plausable explanation ... so far.

    The weak force exibits parity and CP variance, and I assume that leads to its ability to switch quark flavours. But from everything I've read, it doesn' t give nearly enough excess matter over antimatter at the crucial tme after the big bang to account for the present day ratio of matter to radiation.

    The explanation for the dominance of matter ( and absence of anti-matter ) is probably still a work in progress.
    The standard model does allow for sufficient CP violation to account for the observed scarcity of antimatter. That is an indication of gaps in the Standard Model, rather than an indication that CP symmetry is not violated.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sakharo...rov_conditions

    ALL of particle physics is a work in progress. No one can even explain the nuclear binding forces between nucleons (the so-called residual strong force) in terms of quantum chromodynamics.

    The ony two current explanations for the dominance of matter are CP violation or "it started that way". The latter is not very satisfying. I guess you could also invoke invisible pink pixies.
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    I agre DrR, present day antimatter will always be zero, since they annihilated in matter/antimatter pairs, only the excess matter survived along with the radiation ( resulting from matter/antimatter annihilation ). My understanding is that this ratio of matter to radiation, as aresult of CP violation, is one or two orders of magnitude off.

    Oh , and I don't believe in pink pixies either.
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  11. #10  
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    Huh? Got a reference for that
    ?

    I saw the table with antimatter, being the last one I saw I thought it had been officially updated.
    My mistake.

    Mission experimentsEndeavour will perform four Department of Defense payloads of opportunity: MAUI, SEITI, RAMBO-2, and SIMPLEX. All four of these experiments require engine and thruster firings. They will be completed if there is sufficient propellant on board Endeavour.
    I don't see evidence of or results to antimatter experiments, but I may have missed it.

    The results are relevant here, are they not?
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  12. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by MigL
    I agre DrR, present day antimatter will always be zero, since they annihilated in matter/antimatter pairs, only the excess matter survived along with the radiation ( resulting from matter/antimatter annihilation ). My understanding is that this ratio of matter to radiation, as aresult of CP violation, is one or two orders of magnitude off.

    Oh , and I don't believe in pink pixies either.
    Present day antimatter is not zero. Anti-particles are created and annihilate with ordinary particles all the time. Positron emission tomography is an established technology used in medicine. The Fermilab accelerator conducts proton-antiproton collisions.

    Anti-matter exists. There is just not much of it.
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  13. #12  
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    The results are relevant ....No
    Observations by NASA have no meaning to your theory? You just don't want to hear from me, I would guess.

    I love you too.

    All evidence currently indicates that the universe is made of matter; however, the Big Bang theory ...origin of the universe requires equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Theories that explain this apparent asymmetry violate other measurements.

    Whether or not there is significant antimatter is one of the fundamental questions of the origin and nature of the universe.

    Any observations of an antihelium nucleus would provide strong evidence for the existence of antimatter .....and resolve the issue definitively.
    from:
    http://ams.nasa.gov/about.html

    NASA believes this needs to be observed, studied, resolved.

    I see mention of the experiments, I can't find the results/determinations.
    I want to hear what THEY have to say.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  14. #13  
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    I hate you
    Moderator, I KNOW this is against the rules.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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    Thomas Jefferson
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    The results are relevant ....No
    Observations by NASA have no meaning to your theory? You just don't want to hear from me, I would guess.

    I love you too.

    All evidence currently indicates that the universe is made of matter; however, the Big Bang theory ...origin of the universe requires equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Theories that explain this apparent asymmetry violate other measurements.

    Whether or not there is significant antimatter is one of the fundamental questions of the origin and nature of the universe.

    Any observations of an antihelium nucleus would provide strong evidence for the existence of antimatter .....and resolve the issue definitively.
    NASA believes this needs to be observed, studied, resolved.

    Sounds like they haven't yet interpreted the data.
    I can offer you two suggestions about quotes and one about logic.

    Regarding responses from other members of this forum - if you quote a portion of a reply in your post, do not distort the original response. Most forum members such as myself read these threads in their entirety. A distortion of another member's reply is immediately obvious to us. You'll be roundly criticized if you unintentionally distort another member's reply - you'll be shunned (or banned) if you do so deliberately.

    Regarding quoted portions of articles or "white papers", you need to provide a reference (preferably a link) so that members can read the full article or paper themselves. Just putting a paragraph in a quote block without citing the source will almost certainly ensure that it will be given little or no credibility.

    Regarding logic - I refer you to your statement that "...[it] sounds like they haven't yet interpreted the data..." This implies that there is data available for NASA to interpret. Otherwise you would have said "...[it] sounds like they haven't yet obtained the data..." You've apparently jumped to this totally illogical conclusion based on your belief that "...NASA believes this needs to be observed..." according to a portion of an article that doesn't even mention NASA and for which you provide no source.

    There is absolutely no logical connection between the portion of the article contained in your post, NASA believing that antihelium nuclei need to be observed and NASA actually having conducted such an observation.

    Chris
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  16. #15  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I hate you
    Moderator, I KNOW this is against the rules.
    Misquoting and distorting the posts of others is against not only the rules but the ethics of nearly everyone.

    You had zero credibility before, as a result of lack of content in your posts. Your credibility is now negative.

    Meteorwayne's use of "hate" was a mildly poor choice of words. Your distortion of his meaning is clearly dishonest.
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  17. #16  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I hate you
    Moderator, I KNOW this is against the rules.
    Moderator note. Consider this your formal warning. Any further distortion by quoting out of context will not be tolerated.

    While MeteorWayne's statement might have not been the best way of expressing his feelings over your actions, it was, at most, a bending of the rules under provacation.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  18. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    The ony two current explanations for the dominance of matter are CP violation or "it started that way". The latter is not very satisfying. I guess you could also invoke invisible pink pixies.
    Does CPT symmetry serve as the replacement for CP symmetry? CP +Time

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPT_symmetry


    Efforts during the late 1950s revealed the violation of P-symmetry by phenomena that involve the weak force, and there were well-known violations of C-symmetry as well. For a short time, the CP-symmetry was believed to be preserved by all physical phenomena, but that was later found to be false too, which implied, by CPT invariance, violations of T-symmetry as well. The CPT theorem requires the preservation of CPT symmetry by all physical phenomena. It assumes the correctness of quantum laws and Lorentz invariance. Specifically, the CPT theorem states that any Lorentz invariant local quantum field theory with a Hermitian Hamiltonian must have CPT symmetry.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  19. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    The ony two current explanations for the dominance of matter are CP violation or "it started that way". The latter is not very satisfying. I guess you could also invoke invisible pink pixies.
    Does CPT symmetry serve as the replacement for CP symmetry? CP +Time

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPT_symmetry


    Efforts during the late 1950s revealed the violation of P-symmetry by phenomena that involve the weak force, and there were well-known violations of C-symmetry as well. For a short time, the CP-symmetry was believed to be preserved by all physical phenomena, but that was later found to be false too, which implied, by CPT invariance, violations of T-symmetry as well. The CPT theorem requires the preservation of CPT symmetry by all physical phenomena. It assumes the correctness of quantum laws and Lorentz invariance. Specifically, the CPT theorem states that any Lorentz invariant local quantum field theory with a Hermitian Hamiltonian must have CPT symmetry.

    It is not a "replacement". It is a distinct symmetry.
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  20. #19  
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    Two short clips, out of context...

    sounds like they haven't yet interpreted the data..." This implies that there is data available for NASA to interpret. Otherwise you would have said "...[it] sounds like they haven't yet obtained the data..." You've apparently jumped to this totally illogical conclusion based on your belief that "...NASA believes this needs to be observed..." according to a portion of an article that doesn't even mention NASA and for which you provide no source.
    http://ams.nasa.gov/about.html

    Whether they obtained data, that was the mission.
    They went to a lot of trouble for this, using the last shuttle mission.
    Other experiments could have been chosen, priority is considered.

    I didn't "conclude" that NASA needs to observe this.
    NASA made that determination.
    Your logic baffles me.

    I want to hear if NASA detected the antimatter they were searching for.

    Observational data is very important to me, and any good theorist..
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  21. #20  
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    (As you would know if you read the linkl I so thoughtfully provided) is not a 3 day experiment. It will be running as long as the ISS is up there, collecting more data, which will be analyzed carefully over time ( years) to see what we can learn. That's the way real science works. Right now they are in the commisioning phase, ?making sure everything works.
    It will take months or years to examine the results.
    I'm sorry that I didn't read that entire link. I have a full life that limits my computer time.

    Do you realy have to be so unsulting and abbraisive?

    I'm not four. I know how the scientific method works.

    I know the advantage of deductive reasoning over inductive reasoning. (because theories are harder to prove than disprove).

    You don't act hateful to stupid people. Noone does, this is taboo.

    Noone beats up on the retarded.

    It's people you don't like that you insult and accuse of being stupid. That shows what character you do or don't have.

    I'm surrounded by stupid, ignorant people in my daily life but I show them dignity and respect.

    Will Rogers: "We are all ignorant on different subjects"

    You did answer my question. Thanks.......CHILL
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  22. #21  
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    While we are all ignorant on different subjects, it pays to know what one's own limits are. Speculating on things beyond those limits tends to be generally unhelpful.
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  23. #22  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    The results are relevant ....No
    Observations by NASA have no meaning to your theory? You just don't want to hear from me, I would guess.

    I love you too.

    All evidence currently indicates that the universe is made of matter; however, the Big Bang theory ...origin of the universe requires equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Theories that explain this apparent asymmetry violate other measurements.

    Whether or not there is significant antimatter is one of the fundamental questions of the origin and nature of the universe.

    Any observations of an antihelium nucleus would provide strong evidence for the existence of antimatter .....and resolve the issue definitively.
    from:
    http://ams.nasa.gov/about.html

    NASA believes this needs to be observed, studied, resolved.

    I see mention of the experiments, I can't find the results/determinations.
    I want to hear what THEY have to say.
    Another suggestion concerning acceptable protocol:

    It's considered bad form to go back and change one of your previous posts without noting in the altered post that you edited it to add "xyz" or change "abc".

    For example: Your 5/28 post quoted above was edited by you on 5/29 to add a reference for the portion of the article you cited. You did this after my reply pointing out that this reference was absent.

    Also, you replaced the last sentence in your original post ("...Sounds like they haven't yet interpreted the data...") with "...I see mention of the experiments, I can't find the results/determinations. I want to hear what THEY have to say..."

    Making (unmentioned) changes in this way may, in your mind, allow you to save face. It changes nothing for those of us who have been following this thread - we already know what you posted originally. For those members who are just now starting to read this thread such unmentioned and unwarranted changes will only confuse them. Changing or deleting a comment in a previous post in order to change the original meaning is especially egregious.

    If you're criticized for omitting a reference or making an error in math or logic, your best bet is to post a reply admitting the error and providing the appropriate reference or correction.

    Likewise if, upon reflection, you feel you've made an improper or incorrect statement your best course of action is to admit it in a new post and offer a reworded statement or, at least, suggest that your original statement should be ignored.

    As a general rule, anytime you edit a post - even just to correct a spelling error - you should note the change in the edited post.

    Chris

    Edited to correct syntax error.
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  24. #23  
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    The ony two current explanations for the dominance of matter are CP violation or "it started that way". The latter is not very satisfying. I guess you could also invoke invisible pink pixies.
    Does CPT symmetry serve as the replacement for CP symmetry? CP +Time

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPT_symmetry
    It is not a "replacement". It is a distinct symmetry.
    So is this similar to how the conservation of matter and energy replaced the conservation of energy, once it became apparent that the two were interchangeable via E=mc^2? CPT seems to be the only symmetry that has survived intact.

    From what sense I can make of this, it seems that both C and P can fail to be symmetric, so long as T changes to make up for it. Also that might be over simplifying it. (Very likely to be, in fact.)
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  25. #24  
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    If matter is formed from energy alone, then energy is a substance?

    Can we see it with an electron microscope?

    Have we seen energy particles in atom smashers?

    This sounds fascinating.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  26. #25  
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    I want to go on record to thank csmyth3025 for exposing and clarifying the unethical behaviour of eleven in this thread and for doing so in an objective, logical, unemotional fashion. I am disturbed by the possibility that casual readers of threads in the forum will be misled by superficially plausible individuals whose heads are buried a considerable distance up their anal cavities. Well constructed observations such as those from csmyth help to minimise that risk by showing those individuals for what they are.
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  27. #26  
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    you guys really have a problem with me, huh?
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

    An enemy generally says and believes what he wishes.

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  28. #27  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    you guys really have a problem with me, huh?
    Please "Eleven" now stop all the other nonsense and discuss the topic peacefully .....Okay............. and the last thing please stop this because i dont want my thread to be deleted because of u okay...............
    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."
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  29. #28  
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    I'm sorry.
    You don't deserve to be punished.
    Is your avatar "Cowboy Bebop"?

    Ruin a thread? My threads are responded to with nothing but personal insults.

    You have it good. You ask a question that is no more than "explain the theory you believe in to me", and of course everyone is your best friend.

    You merely provide a soapbox for the status quo.

    If you're criticized for omitting a reference or making an error in math or logic,

    superficially plausible individuals whose heads are buried a considerable distance up their anal cavities.
    Criticized yes, for an error in math or logic? No.

    Can you show me one example of my "mistakes in math or logic"? No.

    Are any of you scientists? No.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  30. #29  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I'm sorry.
    You don't deserve to be punished.
    Is your avatar "Cowboy Bebop"?
    i told you not to post any thing out of topic but still you don`t understand???................ i think u suffer from inferiority complex as ur attachment shows......... any way .....
    In the first few moments of the Universe, enormous amounts of both matter and antimatter were created, and then moments later combined and annihilated generating the energy that drove the expansion of the Universe. But for some reason, there was an infinitesimal amount more matter than anti matter. Everything that we see today was that tiny fraction of matter that remained.

    But why? Why was there more matter than antimatter right after the Big Bang? Researchers from the University of Melbourne think they might have an insight.

    Just to give you an idea of the scale of the mystery facing researchers, here’s Associate Professor Martin Sevior of the University of Melborne’s School of Physics:

    “Our universe is made up almost completely of matter. While weā€™re entirely used to this idea, this does not agree with our ideas of how mass and energy interact. According to these theories there should not be enough mass to enable the formation of stars and hence life.”

    “In our standard model of particle physics, matter and antimatter are almost identical. Accordingly as they mix in the early universe they annihilate one another leaving very little to form stars and galaxies. The model does not come close to explaining the difference between matter and antimatter we see in the nature. The imbalance is a trillion times bigger than the model predicts.”

    If the model predicts that matter and antimatter should have completely annihilated one another, why is there something, and not nothing?

    The researchers have been using the KEK particle accelerator in Japan to create special particles called B-mesons. And it’s these particles which might provide the answer.

    Mesons are particles which are made up of one quark, and one antiquark. They’re bound together by the strong nuclear force, and orbit one another, like the Earth and the moon. Because of quantum mechanics, the quark and antiquark can only orbit each other in very specific ways depending on the mass of the particles.

    A B-meson is a particularly heavy particle, with more than 5 times the mass of a proton, due almost entirely to the mass of the B-quark. And it’s these B-mesons which require the most powerful particle accelerators to generate them.

    In the KEK accelerator, the researchers were able to create both regular matter B-mesons and anti-B-mesons, and watch how they decayed.

    “We looked at how the B-mesons decay as opposed to how the anti-B-mesons decay. What we find is that there are small differences in these processes. While most of our measurements confirm predictions of the Standard Model of Particle Physics, this new result appears to be in disagreement.ā€¯

    In the first few moments of the Universe, the anti-B-mesons might have decayed differently than their regular matter counterparts. By the time all the annihilations were complete, there was still enough matter left over to give us all the stars, planets and galaxies we see today.
    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
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  31. #30  
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    there was an infinitesimal amount more matter than anti matter. Everything that we see today was that tiny fraction of matter that remained.
    So the ammount of matter combining with antimatter was exponentially more that the leftover matter, our Universe?

    How much energy would be released from that? How would that affect the leftover matter?

    I doubt the "leftover matter" could hold that much energy, or has been observed to. Space is only 3 degrees Kelvin.

    All logic and science, yet watch the insults roll in.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  32. #31  
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    Eleven Said=I'm sorry.
    You don't deserve to be punished.
    Is your avatar "Cowboy Bebop"?

    MY ANS..
    now what is the connection of "Cowboy Bebop" Here????? and then you say we insult you???




    Eleven Said=Ruin a thread? My threads are responded to with nothing but personal insults.

    My ANS---
    Because even after asking for calculations you say there are none of them and than you repeat everything saying there are no calculations but you a
    cant disprove my theory but i would like to ask you CAN YOU PROVE YOUR THEORY?? and what else than personal insults will you get if you aad comments on others posts????








    Eleven Said=You have it good. You ask a question that is no more than "explain the theory you believe in to me", and of course everyone is your best friend.

    You merely provide a soapbox for the status quo.

    If you're criticized for omitting a reference or making an error in math or logic,

    superficially plausible individuals whose heads are buried a considerable distance up their anal cavities.

    Criticized yes, for an error in math or logic? No.

    Can you show me one example of my "mistakes in math or logic"? No.



    MY ANS....
    WHERE ARE THE CALCULATIONS AND THUS YOUR THEORY CANNOT BE PROVED......





    Eleven Said=Are any of you scientists? No.[/quote]
    ANS....
    Why? Are not scientists humans ? So if we are humans then some of my freinds here are scientists...though of tomorrow........ 8)
    "Universe is not as weird as you think it is weirder than you can ever,ever think"- Ophiolite(My Grandpa)
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  33. #32  
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    To get back on topic:

    Does the universe have more matter than antimatter?

    This is an interesting one. The stock answer is yes, because we see lots of say hydrogen out there, and we don't see anithydrogen. We have to make that in a lab, see wiki for details. But take a look at positronium and think about what we're dealing with here:

    "Positronium (Ps) is a system consisting of an electron and its anti-particle, a positron, bound together into an 'exotic atom'. It is unstable. The two particles annihilate each other to produce two gamma ray photons after an average lifetime of 142 ns in vacuum. The orbit of the two particles and the set of energy levels is similar to that of the hydrogen atom (electron and proton). However, because of the reduced mass, the frequencies associated with the spectral lines are less than half of those of the corresponding hydrogen lines.

    Ask yourself this: is positronium matter or antimatter? And how come it is in some ways similar to hydrogen?
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    This is interesting, good food for thought.
    "Positronium (Ps) is a system consisting of an electron and its anti-particle, a positron, bound together into an 'exotic atom'.
    Do they know what "binds" them?

    Another carrier particle?

    Wilkipedia:

    There is considerable speculation as to why the observable universe is apparently almost entirely matter, whether there exist other places that are almost entirely antimatter instead, and what might be possible if antimatter could be harnessed. At this time, the apparent asymmetry of matter and antimatter in the visible universe is one of the greatest unsolved problems in physics.
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    Just wondering- is there such a thing as Dark Anti-matter?
    "Nature doesn't care what we call it, she just does it anyway" - R. Feynman
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    Quote Originally Posted by x(x-y)
    Just wondering- is there such a thing as Dark Anti-matter?
    It is conceivable that the dark matter (or at least part of it) could be antimatter, but there are very strong experimental reasons to doubt this. For example, if the dark matter out there were antimatter, we would expect it to annihilate with matter whenever it meets up with it, releasing bursts of energy primarily in the form of light. We see no evidence in careful observations for that, which leads most scientists to believe that whatever the dark matter is, it is not antimatter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I doubt the "leftover matter" could hold that much energy, or has been observed to.
    Argument from incredulity. Yep, that's good enough for me! Say no more. Because Eleven doesn't personally grasp how it's possible and has doubts, I'm ready to discard the decades of work which has gone into this!!


    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    All logic and science, yet watch the insults roll in.
    As noted right here in this reply, the closest to logic you've come is to use a logical fallacy in your argument. That's not an insult. That's a fact.
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    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I doubt the "leftover matter" could hold that much energy, or has been observed to.
    Argument from incredulity. Yep, that's good enough for me! Say no more. Because Eleven doesn't personally grasp how it's possible and has doubts, I'm ready to discard the decades of work which has gone into this!!


    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    All logic and science, yet watch the insults roll in.
    As noted right here in this reply, the closest to logic you've come is to use a logical fallacy in your argument. That's not an insult. That's a fact.
    Good One inow Especially The FACT Thing
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  39. #38  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex-The Great
    “In our standard model of particle physics, matter and antimatter are almost identical. Accordingly as they mix in the early universe they annihilate one another leaving very little to form stars and galaxies. The model does not come close to explaining the difference between matter and antimatter we see in the nature. The imbalance is a trillion times bigger than the model predicts.”

    If the model predicts that matter and antimatter should have completely annihilated one another, why is there something, and not nothing?
    The model predicts that all there was during the first moments was just photons, and those photons gathered into matter as soon as there was room. They should have formed equal amounts of matter and anti-matter, because that's what happens when energy converts into matter.

    However, Dr. Rocket pointed out earlier that a violation of CP symmetry allows larger amounts of matter to form than anti-matter.

    If I understand it right (and there's a good chance I don't), it's possible for anti-matter to convert into matter by reversing it's "T" or Time component. That may not be "time" in the sense of how clocks measure it. It might be something different.

    Hopefully some of the people who actually understand this stuff will join the conversation again, or I'll stumble onto some really awesome website and post it, because I have to admit I am very curious about this question right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    This is interesting, good food for thought.
    "Positronium (Ps) is a system consisting of an electron and its anti-particle, a positron, bound together into an 'exotic atom'.
    Do they know what "binds" them?

    Another carrier particle?
    They're bound by their opposite charges. One is positive, and the other is negative. Positive and negative attract.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    I'm sorry.
    You don't deserve to be punished.
    Is your avatar "Cowboy Bebop"?

    Ruin a thread? My threads are responded to with nothing but personal insults.

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    You don't strike back. You can't call foul if you strike back.

    (edited back to where it started)
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    In particle physics, CP violation is a violation of the postulated CP-symmetry: the combination of C-symmetry (charge conjugation symmetry) and P-symmetry (parity symmetry). CP-symmetry states that the laws of physics should be the same if a particle were interchanged with its antiparticle (C symmetry), and left and right were swapped (P symmetry). The discovery of CP violation in 1964 in the decays of neutral kaons resulted in the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1980 for its discoverers James Cronin and Val Fitch.
    It plays an important role both in the attempts of cosmology to explain the dominance of matter over antimatter in the present Universe, and in the study of weak interactions in particle physics.
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  41. #40  
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    Yeah, and in the case of kaons, the way they break CP is by transforming into their own antiparticle, with a preference for one state over the other.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CP_viol...t_CP_violation

    Quote Originally Posted by wiki
    The kind of CP violation discovered in 1964 was linked to the fact that neutral kaons can transform into their antiparticles (in which each quark is replaced with the other's antiquark) and vice versa, but such transformation does not occur with exactly the same probability in both directions; this is called indirect CP violation. Despite many searches, no other manifestation of CP violation was discovered until the 1990s, when the NA31 experiment at CERN suggested evidence for CP violation in the decay process of the very same neutral kaons (direct CP violation). The observation was somewhat controversial, and final proof for it came in 1999 from the KTeV experiment at Fermilab and the NA48 experiment at CERN.[1]
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  42. #41  
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    Wilkipedia:

    ...Recent observations by the European Space Agency's INTEGRAL satellite may explain the origin of a giant cloud of antimatter surrounding the galactic center. The observations show that the cloud is asymmetrical and matches the pattern of X-ray binaries (binary star systems containing black holes or neutron stars), mostly on one side of the galactic center. While the mechanism is not fully understood, it is likely to involve the production of electron–positron pairs,
    DrRocket:
    The standard model does allow for sufficient CP violation to account for the observed scarcity of antimatter. That is an indication of gaps in the Standard Model,
    How much energy can an atom of Hydrogen hold?
    How much energy is released in just one Hydrogen-Antihydrogen collision?
    How much more material was involved in the Matter-Antimatter collisions than remains here as matter?
    Is the Universe remaining observed to contain that much heat?

    Answer these questions yourself. Don't worry about me.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  43. #42  
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    Edited, I removed my rude comments.
    All apologies.
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  44. #43  
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    Who the heck are you talking to in your last post?

    Edit 3:57 PM EDT post, that is...
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    Eleven is either trolling or showing behavioural patterns sometimes associated with paranoid schizophrenia. He believes that several senior members use sock puppets on a routine basis to further their conspiratorial aims to brow beat neophytes into accepting the orthodox scientific view. He suspects Alex-the-Great may be one such sock puppet. The puppet's role, in this instance, would be to make non-standard assertions that would be treated gently because the source was not apparently knowledgeable.

    At least, that's as close as I can make it out. He'll be gone soon, so it it's almost incidental.
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  46. #45  
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    Who the heck are you talking to in your last post?
    I'm sorry I withdraw my statement.
    I will delete this favorites bar and butt out.
    Always take hold of things by the smooth handle.

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  47. #46  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    DrRocket:
    The standard model does allow for sufficient CP violation to account for the observed scarcity of antimatter. That is an indication of gaps in the Standard Model,
    How much energy can an atom of Hydrogen hold?
    How much energy is released in just one Hydrogen-Antihydrogen collision?
    How much more material was involved in the Matter-Antimatter collisions than remains here as matter?
    Is the Universe remaining observed to contain that much heat?

    Answer these questions yourself. Don't worry about me.
    Proton anti-proton annihilation (remember that an antihydrogen atom is an anti-proton and a positron) has the problem that a lot of the energy goes into generating more particles rather than just producing gamma rays (like positron electron annihilation does)

    According to the BBT the universe has been expanding for some time. Most of the annihilations would happened early in the history of the expansion when there still wasn't a lot of room, but now there is expected to be quite a lot of room for all of that heat to expand into. Anyway, the heat is all still there. It's just really widely spread out over a very large area.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
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  48. #47  
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    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    Quote Originally Posted by Eleven
    DrRocket:
    The standard model does allow for sufficient CP violation to account for the observed scarcity of antimatter. That is an indication of gaps in the Standard Model,
    How much energy can an atom of Hydrogen hold?
    How much energy is released in just one Hydrogen-Antihydrogen collision?
    How much more material was involved in the Matter-Antimatter collisions than remains here as matter?
    Is the Universe remaining observed to contain that much heat?

    Answer these questions yourself. Don't worry about me.
    Proton anti-proton annihilation (remember that an antihydrogen atom is an anti-proton and a positron) has the problem that a lot of the energy goes into generating more particles rather than just producing gamma rays (like positron electron annihilation does)


    According to the BBT the universe has been expanding for some time. Most of the annihilations would happened early in the history of the expansion when there still wasn't a lot of room, but now there is expected to be quite a lot of room for all of that heat to expand into. Anyway, the heat is all still there. It's just really widely spread out over a very large area.

    hehe dont ask him that kojax because then he will get his head swooning over the question and would take his butt out of this topic....
    :-D
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  49. #48  
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    There's been an awful lot of hype about antimatter recently. Positronium is very interesting when it comes to antimatter:

    "Positronium (Ps) is a system consisting of an electron and its anti-particle, a positron, bound together into an 'exotic atom'. It is unstable. The two particles annihilate each other to produce two gamma ray photons after an average lifetime of 142 ns in vacuum. The orbit of the two particles and the set of energy levels is similar to that of the hydrogen atom (electron and proton). However, because of the reduced mass, the frequencies associated with the spectral lines are less than half of those of the corresponding hydrogen lines.

    IMHO one should think along these lines:

    Q: Is positronium similar to hydrogen?
    A: In some respects. It's likened to a "light" version of hydrogen, see for example this article.

    Q: Can you have a "heavy" version of positronium, where the two component particles are attracted to one another to form a bond, but can't annihilate because of some important difference between them?
    A: You wouldn't call it positronium any more, but replace the electron with an antiproton for one version, or replace the positron with a proton for another.

    Q: Is positronium matter or antimatter?
    A: It's both.
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