Notices
Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Is Michio Kaku wrong??

  1. #1 Is Michio Kaku wrong?? 
    Forum Bachelors Degree
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    404
    I have just watched Michio Kaku on a short TV interview and am afraid disagree with something he says.........

    He was discussing types of civilizations and expressed the theory that at a certain level a race can be considered immortal because it can stop ice ages and other much larger events which would be able to effectively wipe our race out......

    Now I am NOT going to have this out at the legend himself and appreciate it might just be 'one of those things' lurking around in Science classes even if just there for theory but I am afraid I have to disagree with the idea that a civilization can ever be literally immortal -

    bigger things have bigger problems..........with there being an infinite universe these things are always in proportion.......so it doesn't matter what size you are - the fight is always the same...........

    Is the term Immortal being too literally interpreted in my rough explanation? Or would someone out there agree that in an infinite universe (one with no known end) it is absurd to say that the bigger a race gets the more immortal it is?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,440
    I think that if you're spread over enough planets and star systems, there's no known events that could wipe you out all at once (other than the end of the universe). Even the collision of two galaxies shouldn't matter too much to individual stars.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Isotope
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Transient
    Posts
    2,914
    Yeah, think about a civilization like Rome. Spread across Europe, there was pretty much no way a single event would kill all Romans, save the end of the world. A lot of smaller, more localized catastrophes, however, could easily spell the end for such a civilization. Rome, the prime example of this.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Bachelors Degree
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    404
    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane_Mathematician
    Yeah, think about a civilization like Rome. Spread across Europe, there was pretty much no way a single event would kill all Romans, save the end of the world. A lot of smaller, more localized catastrophes, however, could easily spell the end for such a civilization. Rome, the prime example of this.
    I can go along with this one - the idea that localized catastrophes could spell the end for a civilization and not the race would make sense to me.

    He was using the terms 'civilization' and 'race' in a very lose fashion unfortunately

    Scientists should not be allowed to relax on TV :P
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Vancouver, Wa
    Posts
    2,290
    Mr Kaku's actual work in physics; http://arxiv.org/find/grp_physics/1/.../0/1/0/all/0/1.
    I don't know how good it is. I might read some of it later.
    The general consensus seem's to be that he is more of a PR guy than a physicist. Heck, we all got our roles to play.
    I was some of the mud that got to sit up and look around.
    Lucky me. Lucky mud.
    -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.-
    Cat's Cradle.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Mr Kaku's actual work in physics; http://arxiv.org/find/grp_physics/1/.../0/1/0/all/0/1.
    I don't know how good it is. I might read some of it later.
    The general consensus seem's to be that he is more of a PR guy than a physicist. Heck, we all got our roles to play.
    Thanks man!, Im quite a fan of Michio Kaku, though i do hear people out there say he is a popularizer in science nevertheless i do realize he is in one of the earlier developers of String theory. I always really wanted to know what his work actually was on.
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Mr Kaku's actual work in physics; http://arxiv.org/find/grp_physics/1/.../0/1/0/all/0/1.
    I don't know how good it is. I might read some of it later.
    The general consensus seem's to be that he is more of a PR guy than a physicist. Heck, we all got our roles to play.
    Thanks man!, Im quite a fan of Michio Kaku, though i do hear people out there say he is a popularizer in science nevertheless i do realize he is in one of the earlier developers of String theory. I always really wanted to know what his work actually was on.
    He likes to sell books. He is not one of the big boys in string theory.

    I own one book by Kaku, on quantum field theory. I am not likely to ever own two. I have several hundred science and mathematics books.

    If Kaku said the sky was blue, I would go outside and check.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    He likes to sell books. He is not one of the big boys in string theory.

    I own one book by Kaku, on quantum field theory. I am not likely to ever own two. I have several hundred science and mathematics books.

    If Kaku said the sky was blue, I would go outside and check.
    His contributions to string theory maybe has not caused a groundbreaking impact BUT, it is still pretty important right??
    I infact own most of his science books including Hyperspace, Beyond Einstein, Parallel worlds, and in my opinion they were pretty fascinating for a non professional science guy(me).
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    He likes to sell books. He is not one of the big boys in string theory.

    I own one book by Kaku, on quantum field theory. I am not likely to ever own two. I have several hundred science and mathematics books.

    If Kaku said the sky was blue, I would go outside and check.
    His contributions to string theory maybe has not caused a groundbreaking impact BUT, it is still pretty important right??
    I infact own most of his science books including Hyperspace, Beyond Einstein, Parallel worlds, and in my opinion they were pretty fascinating for a non professional science guy(me).
    None of those are actually science books. They are popularizations. I wouldn't buy them on a bet.

    Kaku is important only to Kaku. (Well maybe his dog likes him too.)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    He likes to sell books. He is not one of the big boys in string theory.

    I own one book by Kaku, on quantum field theory. I am not likely to ever own two. I have several hundred science and mathematics books.

    If Kaku said the sky was blue, I would go outside and check.
    His contributions to string theory maybe has not caused a groundbreaking impact BUT, it is still pretty important right??
    I infact own most of his science books including Hyperspace, Beyond Einstein, Parallel worlds, and in my opinion they were pretty fascinating for a non professional science guy(me).
    None of those are actually science books. They are popularizations. I wouldn't buy them on a bet.

    Kaku is important only to Kaku. (Well maybe his dog likes him too.)
    really??i thought hyperspace was pretty evens in terms of the content on string theory as compared with "the fabric of the cosmos" , and i know that Greene's books are good. Ah well..
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    really??i thought hyperspace was pretty evens in terms of the content on string theory as compared with "the fabric of the cosmos" , and i know that Greene's books are good. Ah well..
    I haven't read the book, bit I have heard him talk. It was pure bullshit.

    I would not waste a nickel pn anyrhing that he has written. Stick to stuff by the A-team.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    really??i thought hyperspace was pretty evens in terms of the content on string theory as compared with "the fabric of the cosmos" , and i know that Greene's books are good. Ah well..
    I haven't read the book, bit I have heard him talk. It was pure bullshit.

    I would not waste a nickel pn anyrhing that he has written. Stick to stuff by the A-team.
    Whatever Doc.
    BTW i have a question for you, you are a Mathematician right?? Did you make any minor or major contributions to mathematics so far in your life?
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    really??i thought hyperspace was pretty evens in terms of the content on string theory as compared with "the fabric of the cosmos" , and i know that Greene's books are good. Ah well..
    I haven't read the book, bit I have heard him talk. It was pure bullshit.

    I would not waste a nickel pn anyrhing that he has written. Stick to stuff by the A-team.
    Whatever Doc.
    BTW i have a question for you, you are a Mathematician right?? Did you make any minor or major contributions to mathematics so far in your life?
    I did a llong time ago. But I worked in aerospace/defense for many years after that,
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    really??i thought hyperspace was pretty evens in terms of the content on string theory as compared with "the fabric of the cosmos" , and i know that Greene's books are good. Ah well..
    I haven't read the book, bit I have heard him talk. It was pure bullshit.

    I would not waste a nickel pn anyrhing that he has written. Stick to stuff by the A-team.
    Whatever Doc.
    BTW i have a question for you, you are a Mathematician right?? Did you make any minor or major contributions to mathematics so far in your life?
    I did a llong time ago. But I worked in aerospace/defense for many years after that,
    What field of mathematics did you give your contributions to?

    Aerospace/defense?? Like government technology or what NASA stuff??
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Forum Bachelors Degree 15uliane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    depends...
    Posts
    425
    I agree with the general consesus- he is more of a science celebrity and dreamer than a real physicist. String field theory is real, as is his proffesorship, but I think the only place for a scientist is at work.
    No I have never made any mathematical contributions in my life. In fact, I have never had a real job (dont worry- I'm not that old yet).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  17. #16  
    Forum Bachelors Degree 15uliane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    depends...
    Posts
    425
    I agree with the general consesus- he is more of a science celebrity and dreamer than a real physicist. String field theory is real, as is his proffesorship, but I think the only place for a scientist is at work.
    No I have never made any mathematical contributions in my life. In fact, I have never had a real job (dont worry- I'm not that old yet).
    Reply With Quote  
     

  18. #17  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    Quote Originally Posted by 15uliane
    I agree with the general consesus- he is more of a science celebrity and dreamer than a real physicist. String field theory is real, as is his proffesorship, but I think the only place for a scientist is at work.
    No I have never made any mathematical contributions in my life. In fact, I have never had a real job (dont worry- I'm not that old yet).

    Im not that old either, just gonna turn 17. So i guess im aslo still abit from getting my first job.
    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  19. #18  
    Forum Bachelors Degree 15uliane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    depends...
    Posts
    425
    :-D
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •