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Thread: Magnetism

  1. #1 Magnetism 
    Forum Freshman Aero's Avatar
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    I just bought some neocubes ( or zenmagnets or buckyballs are whatever you want to call them), they are basically small magnets, if you don't know these, shame on you and check youtube to see what i'm talking about

    So i was wondering if you could disconnect a single dot from the cord of magnets,
    and hold it at a length from the cord so that the force of the attraction of the magnets equals the force of the gravity on the small magnet, thus making the small magnet 'float' in the air ?

    If it's not understandable what i mean, i'll post some pics


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  3. #2  
    Forum Isotope
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    yes, but the equilibrium is very very delicate and easily disturbed.


    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

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  4. #3  
    Your Mama! GiantEvil's Avatar
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    According to a lecture on gravity, from Richard Feynman, that I have on CD;
    Both magnetism and gravity obey an "inverse square of distance" law.
    The ratio of force for gravity compared to magnetism is 1/1.47 * 10^42.

    My guess is that the point of equilibrium would be infinitesimal in size.
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  5. #4 Re: Magnetism 
    Time Lord
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aero
    I just bought some neocubes ( or zenmagnets or buckyballs are whatever you want to call them), they are basically small magnets, if you don't know these, shame on you and check youtube to see what i'm talking about

    So i was wondering if you could disconnect a single dot from the cord of magnets,
    and hold it at a length from the cord so that the force of the attraction of the magnets equals the force of the gravity on the small magnet, thus making the small magnet 'float' in the air ?

    If it's not understandable what i mean, i'll post some pics
    I think the main problem you're always going to have is that the magnets simply re-orient themselves to whatever direction is the most attractive. In order for it to hover in air, there would have to be magnets above it as well as below. Otherwise, there will always be a way for it to align itself so that the attractive force is greater than the repulsive force.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman Aero's Avatar
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    Great answers, makes some things clear
    Thanks for the answers.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane_Mathematician
    yes, but the equilibrium is very very delicate and easily disturbed.
    I agree with Arcane and kojax. The equilibrium would be unconditionally unstable. Though theoretically possible, for all practical purposes, this would be impossible to do.
    "... the polhode rolls without slipping on the herpolhode lying in the invariable plane."
    ~Footnote in Goldstein's Mechanics, 3rd ed. p. 202
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