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Thread: Bouyancy depth dependancy?

  1. #1 Bouyancy depth dependancy? 
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    I remember reading in a book (fiction) that at a certain depth (around ten meters) a diver no longer floats to the surface.

    Now we had a brief discussion about whether this could be true or not. Anyone here who knows if it is so, and if so - what is the cause?


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  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. william's Avatar
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    The only way I can imagine this to be true is when the density of the human body is roughly equal to that of the surrounding medium. How might this happen? The deeper a diver goes, the more pressure he encounters. This pressure, perhaps, could compress the body into a smaller volume, thus increasing the body's density.

    This is just how I imagine how it could happen. Whether it actually does or not, I don't know.


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  4. #3  
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    A skinny boy can sink with lungs half-emptied of air.

    Air is more compressible than water.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  5. #4 Re: Bouyancy depth dependancy? 
    Forum Radioactive Isotope MagiMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakotaco
    I remember reading in a book (fiction) that at a certain depth (around ten meters) a diver no longer floats to the surface.

    Now we had a brief discussion about whether this could be true or not. Anyone here who knows if it is so, and if so - what is the cause?
    If you emptied your lungs, you will sink even from the surface. Go deep enough and the pressure will compress the air enough to do the same thing.
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  6. #5  
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    Okay, thanks for the replies.

    So if there is such an effect it can probably be attributed to humans being more compressible than water I take it.

    Any free divers who can say for sure whether one experiences any such effects?
    "Complexity is stupidity disguised as intellect."
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