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Thread: seek of a liquid

  1. #1 seek of a liquid 
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    greetings colleagues!

    i need a liquid which is a good heat conductor but not a conductor of electricity ,and also must be fluid.

    i need that liquid for a research of a new project in uni.

    by the way the cheaper liquid is better

    what's ur offer or how and where can i find it?


    thanks

    fg


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  3. #2  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    De-ionized water.


    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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  4. #3  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrmonroe
    De-ionized water.
    is it pure water?
    even if water is pure that conducts a little bit electricity ;
    "0,055 S/cm (25C)" i found this for pure water. so pure water does't fit
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  5. #4  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
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    AFAIK, all substances offer some amount of resistance to the flow of electrons. Substances with low resistances are called conductors. Substances with high resistances are called insulators.

    Here are the conductivities of some substances. I seriously discourage subjecting hydrocarbons to electric current, so DI water looks like your best bet.

    DI water, RODI water (reverse osmosis de-ionized water), WFI (water for injection) and "18 Meg water" (the same as 0.055 S/cm) are probably as close to pure water as you'll find. Distilled water, less so. Machines in the lab make this water, or you can buy it by the jug from lab suppliers.

    What do you want to use it for?
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
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  6. #5  
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    Why not using Kerosine?
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  7. #6  
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    i'll use this liquid in cooling system.

    what do u think about transformer oil? it was offered by other friends.

    i searched its property
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transformer_oil

    i think it fits.but i'm not sure it's fluidity.can we transfer it in pipes-canals(r=0.5 cm) as easy as water.?

    thank u all

    edt: fluidness->fluidity
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  8. #7  
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    Cooling system... then definitely not kerosine
    For transformer oil, to tell you the truth, I have no idea. I don't even know it's properties. Maybe try conducting experiments before constructing that cooling system...
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  9. #8  
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    i searched it conducts till 2000kVolts.
    and it's not expensive.18lt=120usd something like that.
    i need 2-3 lts.

    i could not figure out its fluidity-viscosity.
    it's units r very confusing.
    cSt,cP,pa like that i just want to compare with water but i could not find their values in same unit.

    the oils viscosity is 70 cSt(50'C) ,water is 1cP (20'C)

    how can i compare cSt with cP ? plz helllppppp
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  10. #9  
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    cP is the unit of absolute viscosity.
    cSt is the unit of kinematic viscosity.
    To convert cP to cSt divide the viscosity in cP by the specific gravity at the same temperature.

    Here is a calculator.

    http://www.pumpcalcs.com/calculators/view/122/

    Dow Chemical makes a range of heat transfer fluids that might be suitable.

    http://www.dow.com/heattrans/app/chem.htm
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  11. #10  
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    Poly Chlorinated Biphenols were used until a few decades ago for their heat transfer, low conductivity and low reactivity, in transformers. Unfortunately they are now outlawed so you can't get them. Just joking.

    We could better suggest a heat tranfer fluid is we knew the application, the temperature range and the voltage requirements.
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  12. #11  
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    voltage is max 220V.not much actually if i take-put out the power supply voltage'll be max 25V.
    and temp. gap is 5-80'C not much.of course if we succeed that project ,if don't temp. will be over 100'C maybe 120.
    SAU Atomic&Molecular Physics , Ph.D.
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