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  1. #1 Feynman lectures on physics 
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    I have heard of this book, and now even have it, but i just want to ask for the experienced, just how good are these lectures in these books??

    what age level are these aimed at? i mean the epilogue does mention its for those in the first year graduate for physics at Caltech.

    thanks


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  3. #2 Re: Feynman lectures on physics 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    I have heard of this book, and now even have it, but i just want to ask for the experienced, just how good are these lectures in these books??

    what age level are these aimed at? i mean the epilogue does mention its for those in the first year graduate for physics at Caltech.

    thanks
    It is the text of lectures delivered to a freshman (not first year graduate) class at Cal Tech in the 1960's.

    It is probably the best physics text ever written. It contains, at an introductory level, a tremendous amount of physics.

    It is not an easy text, but it is simply stupendous.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    Thanks for that, and also you seem to know a great deal about this book. Well i was going through chapter 13 and 14 and found this integral which i couldn't find make sense to, could you explain it?



    what i dont get is the The indicates some curved distance in a gravitational field and the sides of the triangle are . the is the angle between the hypotenuse "s" and "x"

    where ac is the hypotenuse of the triangle. this part of the book tries to prove the fact that an object moving in a gravitational field needs Zero Work.

    thank you
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  5. #4  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Thanks for that, and also you seem to know a great deal about this book. Well i was going through chapter 13 and 14 and found this integral which i couldn't find make sense to, could you explain it?



    what i dont get is the The indicates some curved distance in a gravitational field and the sides of the triangle are . the is the angle between the hypotenuse "s" and "x"

    where ac is the hypotenuse of the triangle. this part of the book tries to prove the fact that an object moving in a gravitational field needs Zero Work.

    thank you
    I suggest that you:

    1) Start with section 1 and not section 13. Feynman's book is quite deep and you will not understand it by skimming it quickly. You will need to think about each statement that Feynman makes. It is worth the effort. Feynman was a roaring genius and had tremendous physical intuition. You can get a gliimpse of that intuition by reading the book very carefully with a lot of thought.

    2) Read what Feynman is saying. He explains that integral in detail in the text (page 13-5). Note that you are dealing here with a line integral, and not just the ordinary integral that you learned in introductory calculus.

    3) Read the text more closely. It does NOT say that "an object moving in a gravitational field need zero work" It says "the work done on an object going around any path in a gravitational field is zero". Feynman is talking about a closed path and this is equivalent to saying that a gravitatinal field is conservative -- conservation of energy applies to gravity.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    Only skipped the chapter with the theory of special relativity, the others ive finished, though i wont say i understand them fully. But it doesn't seem to be all that hard, the mathematics involved are the techniques ive already learned apart from Vector calculus curl, Partial derivatives etc...

    Read what Feynman is saying. He explains that integral in detail in the text (page 13-5). Note that you are dealing here with a line integral, and not just the ordinary integral that you learned in introductory calculus.
    line integral? that seems to be a little new for me. Better try and study it.
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  7. #6  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    Only skipped the chapter with the theory of special relativity, the others ive finished, though i wont say i understand them fully. But it doesn't seem to be all that hard, the mathematics involved are the techniques ive already learned apart from Vector calculus curl, Partial derivatives etc...

    Read what Feynman is saying. He explains that integral in detail in the text (page 13-5). Note that you are dealing here with a line integral, and not just the ordinary integral that you learned in introductory calculus.
    line integral? that seems to be a little new for me. Better try and study it.
    You are correct in that Feynman does not assume any mathematics beyond calculus for his development of physics. But he developes what he needs along the way, and you cannot read that book too quickly unless you already have a fairly sophisticated background in mathematics and physics.

    It is not the techniques that are deep, but rather the concepts. So slow down and read the text very carefully.
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  8. #7  
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    You are correct in that Feynman does not assume any mathematics beyond calculus for his development of physics. But he developes what he needs along the way, and you cannot read that book too quickly unless you already have a fairly sophisticated background in mathematics and physics.

    It is not the techniques that are deep, but rather the concepts. So slow down and read the text very carefully.
    alright, ill slow down and try to take deeper understanding to it. But so far its not too hard. Everything seems to be explained really well.
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  9. #8  
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    One problem is that it dosen't have any problems for you to solve.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris11
    One problem is that it dosen't have any problems for you to solve.
    Here you go:

    http://www.feynmanlectures.info/exercises.html
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