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Thread: Question about quantum physics?

  1. #1 Question about quantum physics? 
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    I don't know that much about quantum physics but I always here about Schrodinger's

    cat and wave function collapse when something is observed. Well the way we

    observe things is by having particles interact correct? Then isn't it impossible for

    more than one particle in a vacuum to be uncertain. All other particles are constantly

    interacting with each other and "observing" each other so wouldn't that hold them in

    a constant state.

    I mean two particles interacting with each other would observe each others

    states so when you find them they'd be in the states they observed each other in?
    (Is this a no-brainer that I should have gotten a long time ago?)

    And if there is background radiation in the universe then is everything being observed constantly and everything collapsed into a single state?

    Again just some thoughts, I know nothing about the mathematical workings of quantum physics.


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  3. #2  
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    the two particles may interact with each other, however that doesn't mean that they're "observing" each other. when we use a Scanning Tunneling Electron Microscope to view a very small particle we have to bounce a particle off of it. this particle is also a wave(basic particle physics) say we're using a photon. the frequency times the wavelength always equals the speed of light (about 300,000 meter's per second if i remember correctly).

    now when we observe the particle we're trying to observe(for simplicity's sake let's say then electron from a hydrogen atom) what we have to do is bounce our photon off of the particle and watch what happens to our photon. through the act of observing the particle we have disturbed it and our measurement is no longer valid.

    the uncertainty principle arises from the fact that in order to get a very accurate measurement of position on the electron we need to use a photon with a tiny wavelength, and as a law photons with relatively small wavelengths have relatively high energy. so if we get a very good measurement of the electron's position then we impart a large amount of energy to it and we get a very bad measurement of it's momentum. we can do the opposite by getting a high wavelength particle which will only change the momentum of the electron slightly but we're less certain of it's position when it interacted with the photon.

    i hope i've helped. and if i haven't then you should probably grab a physics textbook and read up on basic quantum mechanics.


    physics: accurate, objective, boring
    chemistry: accurate if physics is accurate, slightly subjective, you can blow stuff up
    biology: accurate if chemistry is accurate, somewhat subjective, fascinating
    religion: accurate if people are always right, highly subjective, bewildering
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  4. #3  
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    my bad. the speed of light is actually approximately 300,000,000 meter's per second.
    physics: accurate, objective, boring
    chemistry: accurate if physics is accurate, slightly subjective, you can blow stuff up
    biology: accurate if chemistry is accurate, somewhat subjective, fascinating
    religion: accurate if people are always right, highly subjective, bewildering
    Reply With Quote  
     

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