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Thread: attracting or capturing hydrogen

  1. #1 attracting or capturing hydrogen 
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    howdy gang!
    I'm wondering[for background to a novel] what if anything attracts hydrogen,
    or is there a fairly basic system in which a highly populated available hydrogen source could be depleted of it's hydrogen?needles to say, I'm no scientist. just a disabled retiree with an eye toward writing.
    THANX!


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  3. #2 Re: attracting or capturing hydrogen 
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    Quote Originally Posted by samjaffe
    howdy gang!
    I'm wondering[for background to a novel] what if anything attracts hydrogen,
    or is there a fairly basic system in which a highly populated available hydrogen source could be depleted of it's hydrogen?needles to say, I'm no scientist. just a disabled retiree with an eye toward writing.
    THANX!
    It readily reacts to form di-hydrogen monoxide, which is fairly non-reactive but a pretty good general purpose solvent.


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  4. #3  
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    thanks DrRocket;
    I've read a lot of that stuff online but haven't found anything about
    specifically capturing or 'drawing off' hydrogen or what the most basic specific attractant to hydrogen there might be. My story is ostensibly about a race of spacegoing firemen who 'put out' stars.and i figure for scifi purposes the most efficient way to 'put out' a star would be to deprive it of it's hydrogen fuel.
    my imagination just can't go there without some scientific basis that a pea brain like me[just a 1979 B.A. in art]could grasp.
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  5. #4  
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    The nuclear reactions that drive the "fiery" nature of stars occur in the stars center. The mass of the star is forever seeking to crush the whole thing into a super dense sphere. Possibly a black hole, if the stellar mass is large enough. The amount of radiation produced by the fusion at the stellar nucleus is so great that it exerts enough pressure to resist the crushing effects of gravity. Visible light produced at a stars core can take thousand's of year's to reach the stars surface before it streams off across the universe. Star's exist as a balance between two profound forces. When one or the other gives, the stellar body experiences a horrific, violent, "death". Either crushing down into a Black Hole, or exploding outward as a Nova, or even a Supernova! The processes that lead to these however, are not instantaneous. They can take thousand's of year's to play out.

    Just a little info bout' stars to help you out. Good luck with your novel.
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  6. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by samjaffe
    thanks DrRocket;
    I've read a lot of that stuff online but haven't found anything about
    specifically capturing or 'drawing off' hydrogen or what the most basic specific attractant to hydrogen there might be. My story is ostensibly about a race of spacegoing firemen who 'put out' stars.and i figure for scifi purposes the most efficient way to 'put out' a star would be to deprive it of it's hydrogen fuel.
    my imagination just can't go there without some scientific basis that a pea brain like me[just a 1979 B.A. in art]could grasp.
    Trying to break up a star? That is a difficult proposition. The gravity at the surface of a star is so strong that you would need a very very strong force acting against it.

    I don't know how you'd do it, but it's a very interesting question to think about. I'm thinking you'd use some kind of electric or electro-magnetic effect, but I'm not sure which one (because I've never thought about this before), so I'll have to research it for a while and come back later.
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  7. #6  
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    The sun is about 91% hydrogen by abundance of atoms and 71% by mass, so the idea of removing the hydrogen to put it out seems a bit far-fetched.

    http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/as...s/961112a.html
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  8. #7  
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    I am Unsure being only a High School student but i think that if a heavy material would be inserted into a star it would stop the fusion no?
    so yea maybe they insert a Material X, an unstable element which stabilises as it absorbs all the energy in a star?
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  9. #8  
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    Dihydrogen Monoxide is water(H2O) and you can remove hydrogen from water in two ways that I know of eletrolosis and using swamp algea swamps smell like they do because of the algea that seperates hydrogen from oxygen.
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topalk
    Dihydrogen Monoxide is water(H2O) and you can remove hydrogen from water in two ways that I know of eletrolosis and using swamp algea swamps smell like they do because of the algea that seperates hydrogen from oxygen.
    You are partially right. Dihyrdrogen monoxide is water.

    Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis of water. It can also be produced by applying sufficient heat -- which is how magnesium can be made to burn under water. It is also true that hydrogen is released by some algae during photosynthesis and further reactions.

    However, both hydrogen and oxygen are odorless. Swamps get their odor from other organic compounds.
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  11. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by griffinx15
    I am Unsure being only a High School student but i think that if a heavy material would be inserted into a star it would stop the fusion no?
    so yea maybe they insert a Material X, an unstable element which stabilises as it absorbs all the energy in a star?
    that's a good idea, except "material x" is not something we now have. but if you pumped a bunch of high mass hydrogen(h-2 or h-3) into a star you could tip the scales in favor of fusion and the star would nova or supernova sooner than expected. but to do it in a matter of minutes would take an impractical amount of hydrogen. but if you're writing sci-fi you can just invent a space ship that can carry all of it.
    physics: accurate, objective, boring
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  12. #11  
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    Somehow binding the Hydrogen would almost certainly cause a massive explosion, as the crushing gravity would superheat the core in short order.


    Question: why would anyone want to put out stars on a regular basis? One reason might be to get it to form a black hole, to be used as an energy source/garbage dump. Maybe your "firemen" could use some new method to manipulate dark matter and use it to force the star into forming a black hole (push the mass over the limit in a controlled manner). Once an event horizon forms you would no longer have to worry about it exploding.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

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  13. #12  
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    @samjaffe, can I ask what miracles you're allowing so far? By miracles, I mean carefully chosen breaks from reality. (Stable wormholes, for example.) If we knew what you were allowing, it'd be easier to say how they might could go about putting out stars. I don't think there's any really hard science way of doing it, but if you haven't chosen any other miracles, stable wormholes might be a good one. If you opened one into deep space and another into the center of a star, it could be both a great source of energy and a quick way to drain a star. I'm not sure off-hand what would happen to to the star as its core was drained though.
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