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Thread: IB physics

  1. #1 IB physics 
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
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    can anyone solve this question, i just found it in my physics course for next year, and due to curiosity i was intending to try and solve it, and i still am, but not yet complete.


    There is a table at rest with respect to Myronís frame of reference. There is a clock in each truck that is at rest relative to the truck. Myron measures one end of the table to be at x1′ and the other end to be at x2′. As measured by Linda, at a time t=0 the trucks are directly opposite each other, and at a time t = T, the corresponding positions are x1 and x2 respectively.

    Use a relativistic transformation, to state the relation between and . Define any other quantities used.


    thank you


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  3. #2 Re: IB physics 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinsbergrelatz
    can anyone solve this question, i just found it in my physics course for next year, and due to curiosity i was intending to try and solve it, and i still am, but not yet complete.


    There is a table at rest with respect to Myronís frame of reference. There is a clock in each truck that is at rest relative to the truck. Myron measures one end of the table to be at x1′ and the other end to be at x2′. As measured by Linda, at a time t=0 the trucks are directly opposite each other, and at a time t = T, the corresponding positions are x1 and x2 respectively.

    Use a relativistic transformation, to state the relation between and . Define any other quantities used.


    thank you

    This is a fairly strange statement of the problem. All that you are really given is that the two reference frames are set up so that the origins coincide at time t=0, and by implication that their X-axes coincide (I think that is the ocntent of the statement that the trucks are "directly opposite each other", though it is pretty hard for two points to not be directly opposite one another). That sets up the problem so that the applicable Lorentz transformations are the usual ones found in introductory text books -- what is called standard position.

    Beyond that you are given nothing. So the transformation between time and spatial coordinates is dependent on the relative velocity, and you are not given enough information to determine that. So where and is the speed of Linda's truck with respect to Myron's truck, which would be difference in the readings of their two speedometers if I, or the author of the problem, understand what "directly opposite means. (It would be the sum of the speedometer readings if they are traveling in opposite directions.)


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