Notices
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: What kind of math

  1. #1 What kind of math 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    9
    Hi, I am 15 years old and im wondering what is the most common mathematics you use when calculating physics?

    Im hungry for knowledge so please reply.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Ph.D. Heinsbergrelatz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    994
    well it depends on what branch of physics you are talking about. Such as e.g. Quantum mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, particle physics, experimental physics etc.....

    alot of different forms of mathematics is involved in physics such as Probabilistic interpretation, Methods of approximation, of course calculus (Single & Multi-variable,partial), Analytical geometry, Algebra(1st ,2,3......), and you know all that topological studies, and Trigonometry etc...

    im not sure exactly what "common" mathematics is involved.


    ------------------




    "Mathematicians stand on each other's shoulders."- Carl Friedrich Gauss


    -------------------
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: What kind of math 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega
    Hi, I am 15 years old and im wondering what is the most common mathematics you use when calculating physics?

    Im hungry for knowledge so please reply.
    Much of mathematics was developed in response to questions from physics. Hence, depending on the problem there are varioius mathematical tools that are available to deal with it.

    Since you are 15 you have almost certainly not been exposed to much modern mathematics. It is safe to say that any mathematics that you are likely to learn in the next many years will be applicable to some aspect of physics.

    Probably the stereotypical example is calculus. Calculus was developed by Isaac Newton as part of his program to develop a fundamental theory to explain Kepler's laws of planetary motion. That basically involved Newton's law of universal gravitation, which is expressed in terms of a force law that leads to a description of motion in terms of differential equations. Newton had to invent calculus in order to define and solve differential equation. He was rather successful.

    If you are interested in physics a reasonable progression in mathematics would be to first learn and understand elementary algebra, including trigonometry, and then introductory calculus. After that there is a mountain of mathematics that is applicable to physics. What you need is dependent on your specific interests in physics and you don't have to learn all of it. Mathematics is a huge discipline. Some subject areas are:

    Calculus of several variables and vector analysis
    Linear Algebra
    Differential equations
    Partial differential equations
    Differential geometry
    Real analysis, including measure and integration
    Complex analysis
    Functional analysis -- Hilbert spaces, Banach spaces, Fourier analysis, Schwartz distributions
    Special functions
    Probability theory
    Point set topology
    Algebraic topology
    Knot theory
    Differential geometry
    Group theory
    Lie groups and their representations
    Commutative algebra
    Algebraic geometry
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    9
    Thanks, Ill start working on understanding algebra. Is there any good sites where you can learn the basics of different maths?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega
    Thanks, Ill start working on understanding algebra. Is there any good sites where you can learn the basics of different maths?
    You can probably find sites for about anything. However, learning mathematics is a participatory endeavor. and I have not seen anytning on the internet that impresses me much for learning fundamental mathematics.

    I recommend taking appropriate classes, and reading good books and doing some of the exercises in the books. It is very useful to be able to talk to someone who is learning along with you, or with a good professor who might be teaching the class.

    In your situation I would recommend taking what classes are available in your school and working with your teacher if you want to learn more. Don't get overanxious, and spend the time to learn basic algebra until you can "do it in your sleep".
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •