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Thread: about the absolute zero ???

  1. #1 about the absolute zero ??? 
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    wat will happen to the mass after the vanishing of the volume ..... is it will change to
    energy .................... that just aquistion and i need just an quick answer


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  3. #2 Re: about the absolute zero ??? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ahmed gamal
    wat will happen to the mass after the vanishing of the volume ..... is it will change to
    energy .................... that just aquistion and i need just an quick answer
    The answer is that this is nonsense.

    Volume does not vanish.

    This has nothing to do with absolute zero.


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  4. #3  
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    I wonder if something was mixed up in the translation to English -

    and Ahmed was asking about mass in a singularity (ie, zero volume; infinite density stuff),

    rather than about "0 Absolute" (0.0 K)?
    Nature abhors perfection; cats abhor a vacuum.

    "I don't know; I'm making it up as I go ..." Dr H Jones (Jr).
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cran
    I wonder if something was mixed up in the translation to English -

    and Ahmed was asking about mass in a singularity (ie, zero volume; infinite density stuff),

    rather than about "0 Absolute" (0.0 K)?
    If that is the case then the answer is not much changed.

    A singularity in general relativity is an indication that the theory has broken down, and it is not physical. In fact the singularity is not a part of spacetime.

    It takes quite a bit of work to simply define what one means by the exitence of a singularity in the context of cosmology and general relativity.

    The application of thermodynamics to black holes is a difficult and very specialized area of physics. There are problems with the area, as it is a case of quantum field theory in highly curved spacetime and there are quite a few unresolved issues. To get into it in any detail would require a real expert. Try Bob Wald or Stephen Hawking.
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  6. #5  
    gc
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    Perhaps Ahmed is referring to the ideal gas law: PV=nRT
    According to this equation, when T reaches zero V should reach zero. If that's the case, the reason this doesn't work is that gases are not ideal near absolute zero.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc
    Perhaps Ahmed is referring to the ideal gas law: PV=nRT
    According to this equation, when T reaches zero V should reach zero. If that's the case, the reason this doesn't work is that gases are not ideal near absolute zero.
    Not at all.

    According to that equation when T reaches 0, P reaches 0. It says nothing about V.
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  8. #7  
    gc
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Not at all.

    According to that equation when T reaches 0, P reaches 0. It says nothing about V.
    Depend on if it's done at constant V or constant P.
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  9. #8  
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    It obviously can't be done at a constant P in any real system, since that'd mean V would be 0 (ignoring the fact that you can't get T to 0 in a real system anyway).
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  10. #9  
    gc
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    Quote Originally Posted by MagiMaster
    It obviously can't be done at a constant P in any real system, since that'd mean V would be 0 (ignoring the fact that you can't get T to 0 in a real system anyway).
    True, which is why the ideal gas law is not a good approximation near absolute zero as it does not take into account the size of the molecules.
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