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Thread: How can a negative lightning bolt strike negative earth?

  1. #1 How can a negative lightning bolt strike negative earth? 
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    How can a negatively charged lightning bolt strike a negatively charged earth? That is an awful lot of energy. Has anyone ever tried to harness it for use on earth? Thanks for comments. Joe L. Ogan


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  3. #2 Re: How can a negative lightning bolt strike negative earth? 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe L. Ogan
    How can a negatively charged lightning bolt strike a negatively charged earth? That is an awful lot of energy. Has anyone ever tried to harness it for use on earth? Thanks for comments. Joe L. Ogan
    Well, assuming both are negative in absolute terms, if there is a relative difference, then you have a differential in potential.

    As for harnessing a lightning strike, they have (by memory) several giga-watts of power. This only lasts for a brief moment however. I seem to remember that a negative bolt of lighting is 500 Mega Joules of energy, give or take a bit. That is only the equivalent of 138.9 kilo-watt-hours of energy. At 10 cents a kwh, that's $13.89 worth of power.

    When you consider efficiency, and collection...

    How costly would it be to attempt to get a usable amount of electricity?

    Are large super-capacitors available yet?


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  4. #3 Re: How can a negative lightning bolt strike negative earth? 
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    [quote="Wild Cobra"]
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe L. Ogan
    How can a negatively charged lightning bolt strike a negatively charged earth? That is an awful lot of energy. Has anyone ever tried to harness it for use on earth? Thanks for comments. Joe L. Ogan
    Well, assuming both are negative in absolute terms, if there is a relative difference, then you have a differential in potential.

    As for harnessing a lightning strike, they have (by memory) several giga-watts of power. This only lasts for a brief moment however. I seem to remember that a negative bolt of lighting is 500 Mega Joules of energy, give or take a bit. That is only the equivalent of 138.9 kilo-watt-hours of energy. At 10 cents a kwh, that's $13.89 worth of power.

    When you consider efficiency, and collection...

    How costly would it be to attempt to get a usable amount of electricity?

    Are large super-capacitors available yet?[/quote

    I think that what you are trying to tell me is that the lightning charge is so much more powerful than the earth charge that it repels the earth negative charge and attracts the earth positive charge so that the earth sends a positive feeler toward the cloud and both strike simultaneously and the negative charge from the cloud continues to earth and thus helps the earth maintain a slight negative charge on earth. Thanks. Joe L. Ogan
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