Notices
Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: E=MC^2?

  1. #1 E=MC^2? 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    6
    Honestly.. I am only .. But I want to learn this stuff at a young age..
    What do all these mean?
    Any possible way to learn without school, this summer?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2 Re: E=MC^2? 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    Honestly.. I am only 14.. But I want to learn this stuff at a young age..
    What do all these mean?
    Any possible way to learn without school, this summer?
    Probably not.

    If you really want to learn physics you need to first get basic mathematics under your belt.

    That means that before you tackle physics you need to be reasonably proficient in at least basic algebra and trigonometry.

    And frankly, a decent understanding of physics requires elementary calculus.

    If you are 14 you have plenty of time to learn these subjects. Maintain your apparent high level of interest and things will work out fine.

    Besides, summer is almost over. Have fun and apply yourself in the fall.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: E=MC^2? 
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,255
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    Honestly.. I am only 14.. But I want to learn this stuff at a young age..
    What do all these mean?
    Any possible way to learn without school, this summer?
    is the equation to describe the conversion rate between mass and energy.

    E is energy in J
    m is mass in kg
    c is the speed of light (approx. 3x10^8)

    so, if I had 1kg of matter, if I could turn it all into pure energy, I would get




    DrRocket, while he may not come to fully understand everything he may hear at 14, that is no reason to try to stop him from learning.
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,702
    Good one turtle. Ageists shouldn't speak of education.
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Isotope
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Transient
    Posts
    2,914
    The problem is that that explanation doesn't tell you anything about the equation, only what it's used for. To understand the why and the how of it would take an understanding in at least elementary physics and math up to trig. It's much more complex than a simple plug-and-chug equation, there is deeper meaning and connections with it that can't really be expressed in the simple explanation of the equivalence.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6 Re: E=MC^2? 
    Forum Professor
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,114
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    Honestly.. I am only 14.. But I want to learn this stuff at a young age..
    What do all these mean?
    Any possible way to learn without school, this summer?
    Read my article on the 'Credibility' of this Formula.

    Granted, I am not a follower of much of the science that is being promoted by the 'power' faction today.

    I am a disciple of the Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Planck and Bohr teachings that resulted from the Copernicun Heliocentric theory.

    Cosmo
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7 Re: E=MC^2? 
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Cosmo
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    Honestly.. I am only 14.. But I want to learn this stuff at a young age..
    What do all these mean?
    Any possible way to learn without school, this summer?
    Read my article on the 'Credibility' of this Formula.

    Granted, I am not a follower of much of the science that is being promoted by the 'power' faction today.

    I am a disciple of the Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Planck and Bohr teachings that resulted from the Copernicun Heliocentric theory.

    Cosmo
    Cosmo,

    All that you proved in your article on "credibilty" is that you have none.

    Galileo, Kepler, Newton, Planck and Bohr would be horrified to hear their names associated with your nonsense.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    139
    Agreed, Cosmo's "article" should be ignored until you understand everything about the derivation of Einstein's equation. For that you should know Calculus, and then read Einstein's papers on SR/GR.

    After you understand that fully, you can appreciate Cosmo's comedy.
    --
    -M

    "Those that would give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    -Benjamin Franklin, An Historical Review of Pennsilvanya, 1759
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Isotope
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Transient
    Posts
    2,914
    Even without that, you can appreciate how inane half of what he says is. Simple knowledge of a vacuum tells enough to know exactly how silly Cosmo is.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane_Mathematician
    Even without that, you can appreciate how inane half of what he says is. Simple knowledge of a vacuum tells enough to know exactly how silly Cosmo is.
    Half ???

    Maybe both halves. It doesn't seem fair to discriminate between the two.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Isotope
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Transient
    Posts
    2,914
    Well, some of his BS isn't explicitly obvious BS if you don't have a good understanding of the science behind it, that's all I meant.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    New Member ChildOfLore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    3
    Hi,
    I'm 16 and have been heavy into physics since I was 14.
    You don't really need the maths if you're just pursuing an interest; you're not trying to solve problems or push the boundaries of human knowledge right?

    I just borrowed a Year 11 (the second last year of school, 11th Grade or whatever) Physics text and read that. Also, go down to your local library and look for some books on physics. "A brief history of time" is really complicated and wordy but needs thought not maths. A really good book about E=mc^2 is "E=mc^2: A biography" it's very historical and talks about how the equation is used but it also goes into what it means, it's quite entertaining.

    There are alot of paperback non-fiction books that take an entertaining, anecdotal light to specific problems, look them up in the library.

    One occasion where books > internet,
    --Marlon

    "No man qualifies as a statesman who is entirely ignorant of the problems of wheat" - Socrates
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    6
    is the equation to describe the conversion rate between mass and energy.

    E is energy in J
    m is mass in kg
    c is the speed of light (approx. 3x10^8)

    so, if I had 1kg of matter, if I could turn it all into pure energy, I would get




    DrRocket, while he may not come to fully understand everything he may hear at 14, that is no reason to try to stop him from learning.
    for that little bit. I kinda get that now.
    Also childoflore.. I don't really think you could learn from just "READING" a book..
    Also... If "E" is the energy in "J".. What does "J" mean?
    So instead of 1kg, what would 2kg be?? I tried this.. But I get confused.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Reptile Dysfunction drowsy turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,255
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    If "E" is the energy in "J".. What does "J" mean?
    J is Joules, a measurement of energy.

    It is the work done when 1N of force acts on 1kg of mass.

    http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/joule.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    So instead of 1kg, what would 2kg be?? I tried this.. But I get confused.
    Twice as much. is always the same, and is then multiplied by mass.

    so for 2kg, it's
    "The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair." ~ Douglas Adams
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by drowsy turtle
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian
    If "E" is the energy in "J".. What does "J" mean?
    J is Joules, a measurement of energy.

    It is the work done when 1N of force acts on 1kg of mass.
    Yes, a Joule is a unit of energy.

    No, a Joule is NOT "the work done when 1n of force acts on 1 kg of mass.
    Energy or work occurs when a force acts over a distance. A Joule is the action of 1 Newton of force over a distance of 1 meter.

    If you recall F=ma, you find that 1 Newton acting on a mass of 1kg produces and acceleration of 1 meter per second per second.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •