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Thread: Heat transfer from fridge/freezer to aluminum cans

  1. #1 Heat transfer from fridge/freezer to aluminum cans 
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    I want to find out the rate at which my beer or pop aluminum can that has been sitting at room temperature ~70 degrees will cool in the fridge or freeezer to about 40 degrees.

    I don't need any exact numbers, just thought it'd be cool to learn about heat transfer.

    assuming:
    freezer is 30 degrees and fridge is 40 degrees.

    Need:
    aluminum conductivity rate?
    liquids conductivity rate (pop or beer)?
    formulas required?

    Thanks to anyone who replies. links and w/e else are all greatly appreciated.


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  3. #2  
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    ok, so any links to websites. quick advice w/e. different forum to post in would be nice. thanks


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  4. #3  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    wikipedia.com
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
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  5. #4  
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    This is going to be very difficult to calculate with any accuracy. There will be conduction from the can to whatever it is resting on. It will make a difference if it is sitting on a block of ice, or whatever. There will also be conduction to the air. The aluminum conductivity will not be as important as the film of air that clings to the side of the can. There will be convection currents within the fluid inside the can.

    If you really want to know how fast it cools down, you could do a test. If you are just trying to learn some physics of heat transfer, you might be better off starting with a simpler problem.
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  6. #5  
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    could i not use a Lumped System Analysis to simplify the problem. I have taken calculus and physics but its been a few years so I think I can figure this out with a little time. I don't find it necessary to have very accurate #s. Just something within a few minutes of accuracy.
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  7. #6  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    You can probably lump together the aluminum and the contents of the can and assume they are at the same temperature. As Harold says the air film resistance will be higher than the resistance of the aluminum, which has a very high thermal consuctivity and is thin, and will also be higher than the liquid film resistance inside the can.
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  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D.
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    a calculation is only as good as the data inserted into the equqtion, since there are too many unknown variables for this problem , i suggest you guess at the unknown ones, put a beer in the refigerator, see how close you get, drink the beer and try again till you get it right.
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