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Thread: Ionic vs. Covalent bonds

  1. #1 Ionic vs. Covalent bonds 
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    In another post, I have a question that involves the bonding of atoms. One of the members who responded described ionic bonds as being the same as covalent except covalent bonds are much more polar.

    My understanding of bonding properties is that in an ionic situation, an electron is completely given or taken away to another atom and the electron does not spend time in the orbitals of the other atom. In a covalent situation, the donated electron(s) is shared between the nuclei and with a polar covalent situation, the electron simply spends more time orbiting one of the two atoms. Could someone clarify this?

    Thanks,

    MM

    p.s. "Ultrashogun," I appreciate the feedback and it's always a great thing when someone makes me question my understanding of the sciences. Kudos!


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  3. #2 almost right... 
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    this is my first post - im only 16 but far advanced in the sciences:

    you were right about covalent bonds being the sharing of electrons. However, they are not always polar. H-C bonds have a small electronegativity difference to not make them polar. on the other hand, H-F is very polar.
    Ionic bonding occurs between two atoms with a high electronegativity (for example Na and F) - here, the electrons are transfered (not shared) from one atom to the other. In this case what basically almost always happens is that since now the Na has lost an electron (making it more positive in charge) and the F has gained an electorn (making it negative) their opposing charges attract them to one another creating a very strong bond between them.


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  4. #3  
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    Excuse me, but covalent bonds between two different species of atoms are always polar.
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  5. #4  
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    C-H bonds are the only ones between different atoms that are considered to not be polar. also, are you saying that (for example) C-C bonds (so bonds between same atoms) are also polar are polar?
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  6. #5  
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    C-H bonds are polar, a molecule like methan however is not.
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  7. #6  
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    After doing some research, I think I have the final answer on this.

    It looks like ALL molecules are polar covalent to a certain degree. The terms ionic, covalent and polar covalent are just terms used to describe the amount. It's all based on the electronegativity values of each element and is fully described here: http://chemed.chem.purdue.edu/genche...enceframe.html

    Thanks for the responses everyone!

    ~MM
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