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Thread: Crazy Idea

  1. #1 Crazy Idea 
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    I came up with this idea but I am unsure if it is possible. Basically it is about a system that would create a temperature difference which would be used to convert heat to electricity. A video explaining the idea can be watched on youtube here:

    http://es.youtube.com/watch?v=YGX-qkR_FIc

    I believe this is possible and it doesn't break and laws of physics. Here is why. There are two sources of energy into the system. First, there is the energy used to pump the substances through the system. The main cost of this is pumping the substances through the filter. The energy required to pump the substances through the filter is related to the attraction between the substances. For example, when filtering salt from seawater, the pressure needed by the pump is in excess of the osmotic pressure between the salt ions and water. However if it were the case that the substances being used were not soluble, then there would only need to be a small amount of pressure difference.

    Second, there is the heat coming in from outside the system. This would mostly come in through the heat sink and heat engine on the cold side.

    There are also two sources of heat leaving the system. First, is the energy created by the heat engines. As far as I can see, this energy is unrelated to the energy needed by the pump. The energy created by the heat engines depends on the temperature difference the reaction makes. The energy created by the heat engine is important part of the system as this is the electrical energy we gain from the system.

    The second place the system loses energy is on the hot side of the system. This happens through the heat engine to the outside (as there is no way the heat engine is 100% efficient) and the heat lost through the heat sink on the hot side.

    The idea being, that if the electrical energy created by the heat engines is unrelated to the energy needed by the pump, than it is possible for the electrical energy created by the heat engines to be larger than the energy needed by the pump. This means that there would have to be more heat energy coming into the system from the outside than heat lost by the system to the outside, which would ultimately mean some of the heat coming in from the outside is leaving as electrical energy.

    Is this correct?


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  3. #2 Re: Crazy Idea 
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    Quote Originally Posted by billybob545454
    I came up with this idea but I am unsure if it is possible. Basically it is about a system that would create a temperature difference which would be used to convert heat to electricity. A video explaining the idea can be watched on youtube here:

    http://es.youtube.com/watch?v=YGX-qkR_FIc

    I believe this is possible and it doesn't break and laws of physics. Here is why. There are two sources of energy into the system. First, there is the energy used to pump the substances through the system. The main cost of this is pumping the substances through the filter. The energy required to pump the substances through the filter is related to the attraction between the substances. For example, when filtering salt from seawater, the pressure needed by the pump is in excess of the osmotic pressure between the salt ions and water. However if it were the case that the substances being used were not soluble, then there would only need to be a small amount of pressure difference.

    Second, there is the heat coming in from outside the system. This would mostly come in through the heat sink and heat engine on the cold side.

    There are also two sources of heat leaving the system. First, is the energy created by the heat engines. As far as I can see, this energy is unrelated to the energy needed by the pump. The energy created by the heat engines depends on the temperature difference the reaction makes. The energy created by the heat engine is important part of the system as this is the electrical energy we gain from the system.

    The second place the system loses energy is on the hot side of the system. This happens through the heat engine to the outside (as there is no way the heat engine is 100% efficient) and the heat lost through the heat sink on the hot side.

    The idea being, that if the electrical energy created by the heat engines is unrelated to the energy needed by the pump, than it is possible for the electrical energy created by the heat engines to be larger than the energy needed by the pump. This means that there would have to be more heat energy coming into the system from the outside than heat lost by the system to the outside, which would ultimately mean some of the heat coming in from the outside is leaving as electrical energy.

    Is this correct?
    We have perpetual motion.

    But these systems are available.

    They already have combination AC and heat pumps that are running at something like 23 SEER. Some of the split ductless micro systems that mount the evaporator on the wall, and the condenser outside can pull heat in from the outside down to near zero degrees Fahrenheit. I believe Fijitsu, Mitsobishi both make a heat pump unit.

    http://www.mitsubishielectric.ca/duc...Heat_Pump.html

    Usually the problem with these units is maintenance. The small filter area on the tiny evaporator, causes constant cleaning problems. You would probably need many different systems to do the whole house. Each unit if wall mounted needs a condensate drain, so it must be mounted on an outside wall. If mounted on the ceiling or inside wall a condensate pump is necessary to pump the condensate water outside. Usually a pain in the neck.

    Your whole house needs to be carefully engineered to use these systems. Or a system will run continuously and never satisfy the call from the thermostat.

    There are also whole house heat pumps with electric coil backup, and heaters in the condensors. They work and have some very happy customers.

    Today some of the rich are going for Geothermal systems. Basically a well, dug into the ground that supplies 50 degree water to the condenser/evaporator, all year round. In the winter 50 degree water is more then hot enough to supply unlimited heat to a mansion. In the summer 50 degree water is more then cold enough to supply condenser cooling water to cool it. Some older buildings still use these systems. There are added costs to run the rather large pumps though.

    Some people with the mansions get three phase put in and they use an industrial rack system to create cold chiller water that is piped to coils around the house used to cool the house. Very nice to create separate zones. But each zone needs a condensate drain. A large rack system can run drawing around 10 amps a leg at 220 volts and supply cooling to a huge mansion.

    It can on really hot days or after a power outage, increase the amperage draw and can kick the pump into a second or high stage. And almost double its output. Or in some cases turn on a secondary pump, and backup system.

    The funny thing is that some smaller homes with older systems are probably using that much electricity.




    Sincerely,


    William McCormick


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