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Thread: Surface tension of a Mixed liquid

  1. #1 Surface tension of a Mixed liquid 
    Forum Junior ArezList's Avatar
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    Does anyone know how to calculate the surface tension of a mixed liquid, let's say
    Ammonia-water solution, whose concentration is ruled by you.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Junior ArezList's Avatar
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    No one knows?
    Dude.....


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  4. #3 Re: Surface tension of a Mixed liquid 
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArezList
    Does anyone know how to calculate the surface tension of a mixed liquid, let's say
    Ammonia-water solution, whose concentration is ruled by you.
    http://www.online-tensiometer.com/ob...l_methods.html


    Here is a link it is a bit vague. It is basically saying that when a bubble is first formed just under the surface. The bubble because of a very large surface area to volume. Is under the maximum pressure of the liquids tension. Like when you blow up a balloon. It gets easier and easier.

    This can apparently be measured and turned into a tension reading.



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    William McCormick
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  5. #4  
    Forum Junior ArezList's Avatar
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    Yeah you are right.

    But.....you know I wanna to calculate it thereoticaly without any measurement....will that be possible?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArezList
    Yeah you are right.

    But.....you know I wanna to calculate it thereoticaly without any measurement....will that be possible?
    I could see that some substances although held under pressure by gravity. May have a different surface tension even though they have the same specific gravity.

    So I can not see how to tell if this is so without some kind of surface test.

    Even floating things on the surface could bring in all kinds of variable into it.

    I had never seen the capillarity tube used like that before. I cannot say if it will show a difference between different fluids of the same specific gravity.

    A strong smelling ammonia solutions specific gravity is around that of water. Maybe just 1/100th more then tap water. Of a similar volume. By actual testing.

    Yet you can see ammonia listed as having a specific gravity of .6819 to one, with water as one or unity.

    You have to actually check this stuff out for yourself. Just as some friendly advice. You could go insane just trying to follow it in a book or books and literature.

    I used a scale to check it out.


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    William McCormick
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  7. #6  
    Forum Junior ArezList's Avatar
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    That's quite alot of help. thanks

    and just to check : does that mean in physics if we know the density, concentration, and other physics variables, and also the chemical properties of the solution, then we still can't calculate the surface tension on papper?
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArezList
    That's quite alot of help. thanks

    and just to check : does that mean in physics if we know the density, concentration, and other physics variables, and also the chemical properties of the solution, then we still can't calculate the surface tension on papper?

    I would not rule that out.

    But only because I have never tried the capillarity bubble test. To check the surface tension against the specific gravity of the fluid or fluids with the same and different specific gravities.

    I was thinking about blowing up a small balloon in sand. I don't see much apparent attraction between the grains of sand. A small balloon right at the surface would probably just move the sand aside with little resistance.

    Yet the density or the weight of sand, would if you tried to blow up that balloon a foot below the surface of the sand, cause great pressures.

    This would be new territory for me.

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    William McCormick
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  9. #8  
    Forum Junior ArezList's Avatar
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    well....the same to me......
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