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Thread: How much infrared can oxygen absorb?

  1. #1 How much infrared can oxygen absorb? 
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    I can't seem to find any data on this topic. Does anyone know an Internet source where one can analyze the oxygen molecule? I am particularly interested in how well or how badly it absorbs, scatters, reflects infrared frequencies.


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    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
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    In heat transfer oxygen as well as other diatomic gases are considered transparent to IR. This works well in designing furnaces, where CO2 and water are the main emitters and oxygen is insignificant in comparison. Consequently, since we essentially ignore it as an emitter, there isn't much data on it.


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  4. #3 Thanks for your reply 
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    Thanks for your reply. I'll keep looking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    In heat transfer oxygen as well as other diatomic gases are considered transparent to IR. This works well in designing furnaces, where CO2 and water are the main emitters and oxygen is insignificant in comparison. Consequently, since we essentially ignore it as an emitter, there isn't much data on it.
    I never found to much use for the invisible hard to detect infrared, so I do not have to much experience with it.

    However Radiant heaters output usually runs in the area of two point five microns. Or 0.000038 inches.

    I cannot measure something that small so I am taking their word for it. That is just above microwave emissions I believe, and just below red light emissions.

    I know in regular atmosphere and through quartz there is not much infrared absorbed. It just passes right through. Radiant or infrared red heaters are not actually such great room heaters unless you have something they can target and heat up.

    I was doing an experiment with a quartz wafer, that would have made a modern computer chip. If someone from a large computer manufacturer did not steer it my way. Ha-ha.
    And although you cannot see through the wafer the infrared passes right through the mirrored disc.

    The computer wafer totally blocks light to the eye, and you can see yourself in the mirror. But the IR just passes right through it without heating it at all. That I can measure. Your face gets hot, but the wafer stays cold. That is the design goal I believe.


    in·fra·red

    in·fra·red (in´fr?-red?) adjective
    Abbr. IR

    1. Of or relating to the range of invisible radiation wavelengths from about 750 nanometers, just longer than red in the visible spectrum, to 1 millimeter, on the border of the microwave region.
    2. Generating, using, or sensitive to infrared radiation.

    Excerpted from The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition Copyright © 1992 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products N.V., further reproduction and distribution restricted in accordance with the Copyright Law of the United States. All rights reserved.

    This first picture shows a blow up of one micron equaling about one inch in actual real life. The small transistors shown in the blow up from the optiscope are actually under one micron. A human hair on average is around 22 microns.



    This picture shows a raw wafer.


    This picture shows a wafer after it has yielded the usable chips or the chips that have passed inspection.



    Sincerely,


    William McCormick
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  6. #5 Found it! 
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    1000 nm is the infrared wave length oxygen absorbs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_band
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  7. #6 Re: Found it! 
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    Quote Originally Posted by williampinn
    1000 nm is the infrared wave length oxygen absorbs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absorption_band

    One micron is one millionth of a meter. One nanometer is one billionth of a meter. So one thousand nanometers is one micron. Or 1/10,000 of a millimeter. If you believe the speed of light is 300,000,000 meters a second. I do not.

    I would put that frequency at 300,000,000,000,000 hertz.

    I can easily detonate or disintegrate moist air with simple rugged, archaic high voltage equipment.

    One millimeter is called the start of the microwave zone, leaving the higher frequency infrared zone.

    If you have a microwave and you allow steam to build up in it you can hear the often rather violent electrical effects in the steam.

    750/1,000,000,000 meters or 75/1,000,000ths of a millimeter were considered in the ultraviolet or x-ray zone at one time.

    It depends on what is vibrating, and whether you are cooling the object to get the effect or heating the object to get the effect. That is why all the ranges can over lap.

    And since the vibration is only an effect of ambient radiation anyway, you can create any one of the radiations without the associated vibrations to create them. Especially with varying sized events. Or during explosions.

    But I was taught to look for and measure the velocity of the particles carrying and creating the event. Because you could be sitting next to something emitting x-rays, while it is giving off bright light, radio or sound.


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    William McCormick
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