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Thread: Quantum Entanglement

  1. #1 Quantum Entanglement 
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    How does this phenomenon work? Apparently they use it for quantum teleportation.

    How do you "entangle" two particles? All articles that I read on this never actually tell you how and why, they only say, "oh, this is due to A". Then when you look up A you do not understand it and find out that it means B, and the process infinitely repeats.


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  3. #2 Re: Quantum Entanglement 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    How does this phenomenon work? Apparently they use it for quantum teleportation.

    How do you "entangle" two particles? All articles that I read on this never actually tell you how and why, they only say, "oh, this is due to A". Then when you look up A you do not understand it and find out that it means B, and the process infinitely repeats.
    You can slow in volume ambient radiation to a certain velocity, and it will move an object from zero to a bullets velocity. In a fraction of a second without damaging the object.

    However I would not call it teleportation. I would call it non-destructive, extreme, positive acceleration.

    If you witness it or see video of it. You might believe it was teleportation.

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  4. #3  
    Forum Junior Zitterbewegung's Avatar
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    What you basically do is shoot photons with defined ploarization directions through something called a nonlinear crystal. This crystal splits the incommin' photons into two with a longer wavelength and a combined momentum of the incomming photon. The polarization of those photons is parpendicular to each other and thus clearly defined for both whenever you measure the pol-direction of one of them. This works instantaneaously and independent from the distance of the entangled photons i.e. faster than light interaction(?) and thus hotly debated. But the data shows clearly that this is the case.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zitterbewegung
    What you basically do is shoot photons with defined ploarization directions through something called a nonlinear crystal. This crystal splits the incommin' photons into two with a longer wavelength and a combined momentum of the incomming photon. The polarization of those photons is parpendicular to each other and thus clearly defined for both whenever you measure the pol-direction of one of them. This works instantaneaously and independent from the distance of the entangled photons i.e. faster than light interaction(?) and thus hotly debated. But the data shows clearly that this is the case.
    You might want to take a look at what you just said. You said polarization. Check out the definition of the word. It almost always implies that something, an object or device, sets the direction of electrons, or rays.

    Now how could you send a photon that is claimed not to have a charge anywhere?

    I as you are probably well aware, learned that light is made up of electrons, that these electrons can be set into motion by their repulsive charge.

    Using structures that can cause the effect of slowing ambient radiation in at least one direction, to create a beam of light.

    I just see the flaw of photons not being charged and yet somehow motivated to move.



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  6. #5 Re: Quantum Entanglement 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    ...Apparently they use it for quantum teleportation.
    quantum teleportation is a fancy way of saying that they can transfer more information (which is always transferred by physical means) using entangled particles (bits), then with classical bits. This is by manipulating the effects of entangled bits (aka. after measuring one particle you can know for certain, the state of the other entangle particle). Normally a particle can only send one bit of information, however using an entangled bit allows for 2 pieces of information to be sent (and received).

    The "teleportation" part of Quantum Teleportation, comes from the fact it is possible to "teleport" an unknown state to another particle using non-locality.
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    Why is it called a non linear crystal? Because it allows for a 90 degree phase shift of one photon stream thus making them perpendicular?

    into two with a longer wavelength and a combined momentum of the incomming photon.
    So, it creates two photons at the cost of halving their energy?

    Information is sent via measuring a photon? How does this work?

    How does it allow for two pieces of information to be sent?

    What are the differences between a qubit and a normal bit?
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

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    As I understand it, information can't really be sent in this way, i.e. you wont be able to talk instantaneously with someone on Pluto.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Information is sent via measuring a photon? How does this work?
    As I understand it, being entangled means measurements on each of the two particles will be correlated. By manipulating one particle, the changes are reflected in the state of the entangled particle, which can be measured on the far end and turned into classical bits.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    How does it allow for two pieces of information to be sent?
    If you consider a classical bit, it has a state of either a 1 or 0. In computers, this is done by looking for either a charge or lack of charge to determine the bit state. With quantum entanglement, you're transmitting information physically using (depending on the method) any two level system (that is, having two states that can be separated and measured independently). Usually this is given as electron x-spin, y-spin, and/or electon number. So instead of an integer value for data you have an array with two indexes:



    Where one 0/1 is the state of the x-spin and the other 0/1 is the state of the y-spin. This may not be exactly the way they do it in practice, but the idea is clear. The process is called Superdense Coding, since you can send twice as much information compared to a classical bit.
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    For normal bits, wouldn't it be possible to have 0 set at 0 volts, 1 at .01 (arbitrarily) and 2 at .02 volts, etc...? This way you could have almost an infinite number of values per bit. There must be a problem with this seeing as they do not use it, but what is the problem?

    Is a qubit characterized by any sort of movement? We classically think of the x,y coordinates as related to movement, though apparently the spin of a particle is not really movement./? If it is, then would we not be able to transfer energy through this system (maybe an evolved form of it)?
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    For normal bits, wouldn't it be possible to have 0 set at 0 volts, 1 at .01 (arbitrarily) and 2 at .02 volts, etc...? This way you could have almost an infinite number of values per bit. There must be a problem with this seeing as they do not use it, but what is the problem?

    Is a qubit characterized by any sort of movement? We classically think of the x,y coordinates as related to movement, though apparently the spin of a particle is not really movement./? If it is, then would we not be able to transfer energy through this system (maybe an evolved form of it)?
    Variable voltage is analog. It is much faster then digital.

    However you need quality equipment to separate the analog channels.

    Let your network wiring get old, and you lose quality. You have to have a strong signal, or sensitive dishes to pick it up when you use the air.

    The original cable wire, used to bring 36 streaming channels of color video at once. Then they upped it to 100 plus channels. Then they added Internet. Then they added pay per view. All coming across a single wire. I looked at the signal on an oscilloscope once, wow, a wild mess of signals.

    Years ago when cable was first installed. Everyone tried the free service. It really did not have anything new or interesting to be honest. So we cancelled it. I went up the pole and took the termination dummy plug they used to terminate the line. And drilled it out and made a working connector. Heck we even got the premium channels.

    When they would come down the block to check, they would see the termination plug and think it was not hooked up.

    They could never figure it out. I did it for some neighbors and they had it so long that someone in the family actually thought they had cable and called for service, during a storm or something.

    That was the end of that. Ha-ha.


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  12. #11  
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    Variable voltage is analog. It is much faster then digital.
    Analogue is the literal signal being transferred, while digital is the signal packed into a algorithm that is then interpreted. The idea would be to essentially use the almost infinitely variable abilities of an analogue wave and make it into an algorithm.

    I see part of the problem though, digital signals cannot be corrupted because EMI cannot bring the 0 volts to the needed power in order to be registered as a 1. If you make it too fine and have 1,2,3,4,5, etc... levels then it would allow EMI to bridge the difference and create false information. Though still, you could likely fit at least a couple of hundred levels before it became too fine. The other problem would reside in the fact that you would need a more powerful "bit generator" and likely considerably more powerful, complicated and therefore expensive equipment to process so many values. I guess they cheaped out on us??
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence"

    -Einstein

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    Forum Radioactive Isotope mitchellmckain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frenchi
    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Information is sent via measuring a photon? How does this work?
    As I understand it, being entangled means measurements on each of the two particles will be correlated. By manipulating one particle, the changes are reflected in the state of the entangled particle, which can be measured on the far end and turned into classical bits.
    You understand wrong. Manipulation of one particle will destroy its entangled state and that destruction of its entangled state will be utterly undetectable at the other particle. All the entangle means is that there will be a correlation between the same kind of measurement made on the two particles while they are entangled. Since these measurements are random no information is conveyed by this correlation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Frenchi
    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    How does it allow for two pieces of information to be sent?
    If you consider a classical bit, it has a state of either a 1 or 0. In computers, this is done by looking for either a charge or lack of charge to determine the bit state. With quantum entanglement, you're transmitting information physically using (depending on the method) any two level system (that is, having two states that can be separated and measured independently). Usually this is given as electron x-spin, y-spin, and/or electon number. So instead of an integer value for data you have an array with two indexes:



    Where one 0/1 is the state of the x-spin and the other 0/1 is the state of the y-spin. This may not be exactly the way they do it in practice, but the idea is clear. The process is called Superdense Coding, since you can send twice as much information compared to a classical bit.
    What is incorrect here is the claim that any information can be sent in this way. It is like having a special pair of dice where you know for a certainty that the next time they are rolled the total of the two dice will be an odd number. So if you roll an even number on one die then when someone rolls other die the result will be an odd number. There is no way to use this to send any information. The person with the other die cannot even know whether you have rolled your die or not. When he rolls his die and gets an odd number then all he knows is that if you rolled your die then you got an even number. But since that piece of "information" is the result of a random event, so this cannot be used to send any other information.
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    So what sort of method do they use then?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_cryptography -an interesting article
    Of all the wonders in the universe, none is likely more fascinating and complicated than human nature.

    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

    "Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence"

    -Einstein

    http://boinc.berkeley.edu/download.php

    Use your computing strength for science!
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  15. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cold Fusion
    Variable voltage is analog. It is much faster then digital.
    Analogue is the literal signal being transferred, while digital is the signal packed into a algorithm that is then interpreted. The idea would be to essentially use the almost infinitely variable abilities of an analogue wave and make it into an algorithm.

    I see part of the problem though, digital signals cannot be corrupted because EMI cannot bring the 0 volts to the needed power in order to be registered as a 1. If you make it too fine and have 1,2,3,4,5, etc... levels then it would allow EMI to bridge the difference and create false information. Though still, you could likely fit at least a couple of hundred levels before it became too fine. The other problem would reside in the fact that you would need a more powerful "bit generator" and likely considerably more powerful, complicated and therefore expensive equipment to process so many values. I guess they cheaped out on us??
    You are absolutely right about the cheeping out.

    Digital because it takes more time to transmit. Is actually subject to more interference. With analog there are ways to send a bunch of information in a flash, at least fifteen times faster, do a checksum. If its no good you just send it again.

    I said fifteen times faster however it is actually much, much faster. In some cases exponentially faster.

    With digital all you need is one false read. You can cause a zero bit or a one bit with interference. On or off is very possible. Especially with excellent jamming systems.

    Jamming systems turn things into a capacitor. The other side of the capacitor can be made to become short of electrons or abundant with electrons. Faking an on or off signal.

    You can actually raise or lower the whole area or whole craft in voltage with jamming systems. There is a rule, there is no jamming system you cannot communicate through. And there is no communication that cannot be jammed. These are absolutes.

    Super high velocity electrons had proven to be the best and hardest to jam. Because they are least effected by high voltage.

    Roy Grumman totally had this all figured out and totally understood. But the equipment that he proved the ideas with, was considered to dangerous for honest individuals to have. The criminal law makers know how much they need to be addressed with powerful actions. And some of the systems could reach them.

    The systems and companies that had, or experimented with the really great systems fell out of favor. The systems were tube driven. The tube systems were the only systems that could withstand a nuclear explosion. And severe jamming.



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