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Thread: time vs position

  1. #1 time vs position 
    Forum Junior DivideByZero's Avatar
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    If time is noted as (x, y)
    where x is a number that starts from 0 and counts by ones
    and y is a large matrix describing an event unique to that time x.

    then could there ever be an instance when two values of x have the same value of y?


    for example:
    x1 = time 4242521
    y1 = [earth was formed]

    x2 = time 4242522
    y2 = [gasses in earth moved a bit]

    so basically can time 4242521 and 4242522 ever contain the exact same event?


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    Forum Freshman Xelthen's Avatar
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  4. #3  
    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    If I'm not mistaken, the reason is due to entropy increasing...the universe progressing into a state of disorder.
    Chance favours the prepared mind.
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    What you appear to be referrring sounds a bit like two-dimensional time. That is, two events could have the same value of the time coordinate in one dimension but different values in the other dimension. Is this what you are implying?
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  6. #5  
    Forum Junior DivideByZero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bit4bit
    If I'm not mistaken, the reason is due to entropy increasing...the universe progressing into a state of disorder.
    Entropy would only increase in an unbounded universe, right?
    If the universe was bounded then eventually there would be an equivalence point.


    "Old Fool" I'm not really trying to talk in dimension.
    My "dimension" is (x, [y])
    where [y] is a matrix of whatever unique value for each event.
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  7. #6  
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    Forgive me - I was struggling a little with your notation.

    This bit: "so basically can time 4242521 and 4242522 ever contain the exact same event?" implies that there has been no change at all between the two times (in your notation, they appear to be consecutive "instants"). Some would question whether an interval in which nothing at all happens could be defined. Physically, it would correspond to all "world lines" running parallel to the time axis, and this could not be true of light, for example..
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  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree bit4bit's Avatar
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    Entropy would only increase in an unbounded universe, right?
    If the universe was bounded then eventually there would be an equivalence point.
    This is what I think: if you have the function [v] = f(t) where [v] is some kind of unique value representing any given state of the universe, and t is time, then to have [v] take on the same value for any two arbitrary values of t seems unlikely. To me, it depends on the definition of [v], and its generality. For example a fairly specific value for [v] could be the event, an apple falls from the tree in my garden...a less specific value could be that an apple falls from a tree, and even less specific, that somewhere there is an apple falling. To me, such a value seems a little silly, since there is no real way to give it a strict definition that could be used generally.

    If your value [v] at any t represents the state of all physical things in the universe at all locations, then [v] would contain an infinite amount of information, and therefore I think it would be impossible for us ever to track it over time (which is real-valued), and find an answer to your question. However, [v] would be a value that varies continuously with time, and we know that entropy is increasing (also continuously with time) as unbalanced systems tend toward an equillibrium. Based on this I would say that for an infinite universe, there will always be continuous change of state as energy transfers happen, and systems tend toward an equillibrium.

    If the universe was finite (which is what you mean by bounded?), then eventually the universe would reach a state of equillibrium, and [v] would be constant at all t after that point. I believe there are some theories in cosmology that discuss possible fates of the universe, depending on its structure (finite or infinte or whatever), based on entropy increasing. I think the 'big crunch' is one possible theory where entropy reaches a critical value and then starts to decrease again. I'm no expert with cosmology, but I believe most of that to be acceptable.
    Chance favours the prepared mind.
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