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Thread: general term?

  1. #1 general term? 
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    Is there a general term in philosophy to describe the integration of various theories, but not to the point of acceptance where the individual believes that every detail is correct? For example, a person studies Ayn Rand objectivist theories on selfishness and at the same they study the act of selfless compassion from Buddhism; however, the person does not believe in everything that Ayn Rand or Buddha tries to argue, but just a few particular points from their argument. Sorry, if I'm not clear, haven't slept in the last 24 hours @_@..

    Perhaps Taoism might be similar, or am I way off?


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    Lyn
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    In nineteenth-century France there was a school of thought somewhat close to what you are describing. It was called eclecticism and its main proponent was Victor Cousin. Neither the -ism nor the philosopher are very well-known in the English-speaking world, except among academics mostly, but in the nineteenth century Cousin's influence was enormous. There's a bit more to eclecticism than simply taking bits and pieces from different philosophies, of course, and Cousin himself cautioned that eclecticism was merely a methodology and not a doctrine in and of itself. But it involves what you are describing: synthesizing the best of what previous schools of thought have contributed to human knowledge in order to arrive at a comprehensive and historically inclusive philosophical system.


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    Wow that's very fascinating. I would have never learned of that if you had not mentioned! Thanks
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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyn View Post
    In nineteenth-century France there was a school of thought somewhat close to what you are describing. It was called eclecticism and its main proponent was Victor Cousin. Neither the -ism nor the philosopher are very well-known in the English-speaking world, except among academics mostly, but in the nineteenth century Cousin's influence was enormous. There's a bit more to eclecticism than simply taking bits and pieces from different philosophies, of course, and Cousin himself cautioned that eclecticism was merely a methodology and not a doctrine in and of itself. But it involves what you are describing: synthesizing the best of what previous schools of thought have contributed to human knowledge in order to arrive at a comprehensive and historically inclusive philosophical system.
    Coming from the "macho" world of the military I am not an expert on philosophy but "eclecticism" (as you define it) would seem to be the best "methodology" for a subject such as philosophy.
    Effendi Hussein William Cremola. (Syrian Security Service)
    Intelligence Bureaucrat of the Year-2011. (as voted by the members of Mossad)
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