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Thread: Central Issues of moral philosophy

  1. #1 Central Issues of moral philosophy 
    Forum Senior Booms's Avatar
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    I'm supposed to be doing a 3k word essay questions are:

    a) explain how two different world religions respond to the central issues of moral philosophy (20 marks)

    b) comment on how the film "O Brother Where Art Thou?" reflects on theses issues discuss its implications for understanding religion and human experience (30 marks)


    I'm alright at writing essays I just can't get started on this. and the key problem is I'm really not sure what the central issues of moral philosophy are I know it revolves around morals and values so I imagine they are along the lines of
    What is right and wrong?
    What defines right and wong?
    What is the value of/who decides the value of Life?


    but I'm not sure, so it's making the opening very difficult, so far I've got

    To examine the response of various religions we must first outline what exactly the central issues are. Moral philosophy, a type of Normative Ethics, is the branch of philosophy that addresses the concepts of good and bad, right and wrong.
    To this extent, the central issues follow the same path; What is right or wrong? Why is this right?


    It's not how many questions you ask, but the answers you get - Booms

    This is the Acadamy of Science! we don't need to 'prove' anything!
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  3. #2 Re: Central Issues of moral philosophy 
    Forum Ph.D. Raziell's Avatar
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    Sorry i cant help, but i have to say i dont envy you those two tasks! Really horrible assignments. :S


    A lie is a lie even if everyone believes it. The truth is the truth even if nobody believes it. - David Stevens
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  4. #3  
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    I recommend you pop down to your local library and pick up a books on Ethics. One line of thought on how religion responds to problems of moral philosophy is that it sets out codes of behaviour, almost ideologies that the "receiver" should abide by to ensure social cohesion. Priests etc. appeal to a transcendental force (God) and project the community values and norms onto the instructions of that force ( commandments), so that communal welfare is slowly imbued into us. You could also look at some moral theories to start with - virtue ethics, utilitarianism etc. and see where you go from there.
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    Hi Boom,

    I'm doing the exact same essay(s), and I was having problems knowing exactly what the central issues are in this essay just as you are.
    However, I did speak to my teacher about this and you are on the right lines, though I don't quite remember what he said as it was a good few weeks back.

    I think the easiest way to get started on this is to talk about how subjective morals actually are.
    I mean, despite what people think, they aren't actually objective, as in, definable. What may be right to one person may be wrong to another.

    There was also a really good quote on "What is evil?" but I can't remember the persons name. The gist of it however, was that we, as humans, can't actually tell what is evil until we see the bigger picture. Like how as kids, when they get injections they feel that the doctor is "evil" and it's only until they're older do they realize that this was done for their own good, i.e, an act of good.
    It basically means we don't know what evil is at the present time. Funny how that works, huh?
    Once I find out who it was, I'll be sure to post it up.

    As for the Religion part, my philosophy teacher told me it was alright to do one religion if it had different "sects" or extremely different point of views. Like Christianity has Protestants and Catholics.
    I guess when for that, all you have to do is a short intro on why you've done only one instead of two separate religions, such as Hinduism and Catholics.

    Argh, I'm sorry for rambling, but I actually find it a lot easier to type out on a forum rather than an essay style.

    .Rat

    Edit:

    “If God does not exist, then objective moral values do not exist. But objective moral values do exist. Ergo, God exists.”
    - Possibly from, William Lane Craig.

    This is one of the quotes I found that may help, however, it is pro-god showing that morals are objective instead of subjective so it may not be what you're looking for.
    I'll see if I can find out any more quotes to help.
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  6. #5  
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    The key is relativity. All morals are relative, and that's the KEY issue with moral philosophy, moral relativism. They biggies from most moral aptitudes are Murder, Rape, Theft, Lying, etc, and moral relativity means that there is no set right or wrong value for each of those concepts.
    Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools, because they have to say something.
    -Plato

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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcane_Mathematician
    The key is relativity. All morals are relative, and that's the KEY issue with moral philosophy, moral relativism. They biggies from most moral aptitudes are Murder, Rape, Theft, Lying, etc, and moral relativity means that there is no set right or wrong value for each of those concepts.
    You said it in better words than I did.
    Out of curiosity, is anyone willing to help with the religious side? I mean, how do Protestants or Anglicans view right and wrong? I don't actually know how to put it in words that are appropriate essay wise.

    .R
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