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Thread: A Weird Question

  1. #1 A Weird Question 
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    Assume that you're told that you will die early by an individual who has 100% predictive accuracy.

    How would you logically disprove that?

    Are there any contradictions which you can identify in that?

    I'll answer questions pertaining to the nature of the thread later, its an interesting one. But, answer the questions I've asked.


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  3. #2  
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    I'd stall for time and ask this person that has 100 % predictive power what he means by "early" ??? :wink:

    MB


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  4. #3  
    Administrator KALSTER's Avatar
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    Assume that you're told that you will die early by an individual who has 100% predictive accuracy.

    How would you logically disprove that?
    Besides what MB (welcome by the way :wink: ) have said, How would you know this person have 100% predictive accuracy? If you mean that he has written down precise predictions (ones he/she can't possibly influence himself) and they have all come true to the letter and without ambiguity, then how could you possibly then disprove something like that logically? The only way is if you in fact don't die when he said you would.
    Disclaimer: I do not declare myself to be an expert on ANY subject. If I state something as fact that is obviously wrong, please don't hesitate to correct me. I welcome such corrections in an attempt to be as truthful and accurate as possible.

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  5. #4  
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    Quote Originally Posted by KALSTER
    Assume that you're told that you will die early by an individual who has 100% predictive accuracy.

    How would you logically disprove that?
    Besides what MB (welcome by the way :wink: ) have said, How would you know this person have 100% predictive accuracy? If you mean that he has written down precise predictions (ones he/she can't possibly influence himself) and they have all come true to the letter and without ambiguity, then how could you possibly then disprove something like that logically? The only way is if you in fact don't die when he said you would.
    Yeah, 100% meaning he's "always correct".

    One should be able to find errors and contradictions relating to the prediction.

    The main problem I find is that "early" death is variable, culturally, genetically, and temporally.

    Dying at 30 y.o. could constitute early or late death depending on context.
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  6. #5  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    or he means early in the day, as in morning, or before noon

    or the person means "you will die next to someone with 100% predictive accuracy"

    or there is a fallacy in what you say, if someone has 100% predictive accuracy, doesn't that disprove the possibility of disproving them?
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
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  7. #6  
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    I agree with Chronman. In modern society, we might consider death at 50 or 60 to be dying early. In other cultures and countries where the standard of living is not as high, 50 or 60 is considered a good long life. I think it's perfectly possible to have had a worthy, fulfilling life even if you die younger than that; it's not how much time you have, but how you spend it.

    If someone told me I was going to die early, I probably wouldn't change much in my life. Oh, take a few more cruises, maybe, but I wouldn't stress myself out unduly on semantics.
    I am a student, editor and tutor, and leader of the creative writing club at Hastings College. My major combines studies in political science, international studies, and communication studies. Visit my blog, www.staceyboyce.com
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  8. #7 Re: A Weird Question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chronman
    How would you logically disprove that?

    Are there any contradictions which you can identify in that?
    No inherent contradictions I can see. So you'd have to go meta, like "That person always inverts the truth" or "I'm an eternal soul not a body" etc.

    ***

    My father-in-law died a bit early in November. The doctors were 100% certain, gave him two weeks tops in hospital. This is somewhat topical because he was fully cogent 'till the end and we didn't tell him, ever, that he would die. A bit of dysfunction in that family, so they rathered not face the confessional sort of dialogue prompted by a life's end.

    Because we don't believe in heaven, we're personally responsible for saving souls or destroying them.



    Eh, maybe that's not topical.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
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  9. #8  
    Forum Professor sunshinewarrior's Avatar
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    if 'early' is defined as 'earlier than you would expect', there is a paradox there, and there's a well-known logical/philosophical example of a similar sort that you can look up, usually framed as a 'surprise' test being given to students on some day next week. Logically speaking, it cannot be a surprise: if it's on Friday, there's no surprise, because there's no other day available, so it can't be Friday; if it's Thursday, because they know it can't be Friday, it can't be a surprise because there are no other days available; and so on until Monday...
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  10. #9  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
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    that's assuming a great deal that you cannot possibly know, but only induce about prior experiences with tests.

    If a test, for example, was disguised as a practice worksheet, then you would not know that you were doing a test. If you were put into a situation that was actually a test of sorts, you would likewise not know that you already did a test, expecting it to come on Friday and not to be surprised, only to be told that you did the test already, or better yet, just given a grade that your logically enslaved mind deduces as unjust without due rationalization.

    expectations kill
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
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  11. #10 Re: A Weird Question 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pong
    No inherent contradictions I can see. So you'd have to go meta, like "That person always inverts the truth" or "I'm an eternal soul not a body" etc.
    Haha.
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