Notices
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: How can we find that resonant synchronization?

  1. #1 How can we find that resonant synchronization? 
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    924
    How can we find that resonant synchronization?

    I am of the opinion that we all have a number of personal resonances (talents?) that if discovered give great emphasis to our life’s satisfaction. Those individuals who discover and exploit such a personal resonance can find great self-satisfaction. If that particular resonance strikes a social resonance then the accompanying social display of appreciation can add to the personal satisfaction to the individual.

    I think a successful artist is a good example of what I speak. The singing artist who happens not only to discover a particular musical talent and, if that talent is in accord with a public musical taste, that individual would reap great personal and economic satisfaction. The actor or painter, or any of many possible talents that are appreciated by the public would serve as examples of what I mean by resonance.

    Few individuals discover and display a talent, a personal resonance that can truly excite public appreciation. Those who do display such a resonance are truly rewarded. However, I am not particularly interested in those few but I am interested in considering all the rest of us who have resonances (talents?) and especially all those that remain undiscovered by ourselves.

    It seems that society and all its institutions are focused upon making everyone of us efficient producers and consumers. Nothing prepares us for self-discovery when such discovery is not supportive of a drive to produce and consume. I think that most social pressure from birth to death is directed at the drive to make us effective producers and consumers.

    I chose to use the word “resonance” rather than talent because I think our sense of the meaning of the word “talent” will distort the point I wish to make. “Talent” is such a ‘produce and consume’ word. In fact we have little vocabulary available when discussing what I mean.

    At mid-life when our career ambitions dim and our family are cared for is the time that is available to us to begin to de-emphasize the world of ‘production and consumption’ and begin exploring the world of the intellect directed as an end-in-itself’. Our intellects have been so totally directed as a means to an end that we will have some difficulty thinking of knowledge and understanding that is considered as an end-in-itself.

    Our first encounter with resonance, as the word is normally used, might have been when we first discovered on the playground swing that a little energy directed in synchronization with the swing’s resonant frequency would produce outstanding movement. What a marvelous discovery. We might make similar marvelous discoveries if we decide, against all that we have learned in the past, that the intellect can be used as an end-in-it-self.

    I also think that if a person reaches mid-life without having begun an intellectual life that person will be unlikely to begin such a life. It appears to me that if we do not start such an effort before mid-life we will never have an intellectual life. After our school daze are over it might be wise for a person to begin the cultivation of intellectual curiosity even though there may not be a lot of time available for that hobby.

    Get a life—get an intellectual life!


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2 Re: How can we find that resonant synchronization? 
    WYSIWYG Moderator marnixR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cardiff, Wales
    Posts
    5,810
    Quote Originally Posted by coberst
    At mid-life when our career ambitions dim ...
    i'd like to take issue with you here : i'm in my mid 50s, and i don't feel that my career ambitions are dimming
    in fact, it's only in the last 10 years that i started to find my groove (your resonant synchronisation, if you wish), and now i feel that there's a lot more where this rich vein of self-satisfaction has come from


    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away." (Philip K. Dick)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,702
    There is a degree of practice involved with talent. You are speaking of natural talents, but nature doesn't give you talents, she might determine where you start and where you CAN end up, but circumstances and your choices determine where you DO end up.

    Being creative makes you happy, whether or not you are good at it.

    Some people are good at being happy, these people are also good at resonating with their circumstances. It is not resonating in truth however, since when bad things happen they do not resonate with it, they resonate on their own.

    If you hold onto a resonance(a mindset, a focus) those who do not will flock to you and change to suit your resonance. This is leadership philosophy, "be the change."
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Coberst, I have no idea what it is, or why it is, but I find almost nothing to agree with in any of your posts and much to disagree with. It is as though you had deliberately chosen to distort truth and warp reality, for what purpose I cannot begin to imagine. In your latest post here are just some examples of what I mean.

    1. The conflation of resonance and talents, even when the latter has a question mark, is odd. Now the introduction of oddity can be an effective way of focusing attention, but here it just seems bizarre and confusing.

    2. There is clumsy phrasing: "...we all have a number of personal resonances that if discovered give great emphasis to our life’s satisfaction."
    I don't believe you mean what you have written. (I don't believe what you have written has meaning.) I suspect you were trying to say that discovery of these resonances can lead to profound satisfaction. If that is what you intended, you missed the mark.

    3. "It seems that society and all its institutions are focused upon making everyone of us efficient producers and consumers." This is not the first time you have uttered this particular item of nonsense. You seem proud to extend your interpretation of the American environment to all mankind. I see no reason I should not affect a similar blindness and make my deductions from the UK.

    Here admission to all public museums and art galleries is free. Is that geared to making us more efficient producers and consumers. I think not.

    The goal of the BBC, which produces most of the radio broadcast and the greater part of the TV output in the country, is an organisation funded by public licence payments, is to 'inform, educate and enteratain'. There is little sign of making us efficient producers and consumers there.

    For the last two decades my wife has been involved in a variety of societies and organisations that promote traditional crafts such as spinning and weaving. Is this focused on making us more efficient producers and consumers? To a degree, but not in the sense you appear to mean. While efficient use of resources is promoted, this is more in line with a respect for the environment, honest use of materials, and the strengthening of community engagement and responsibility.

    4. "Our intellects have been so totally directed as a means to an end that we will have some difficulty thinking of knowledge and understanding that is considered as an end-in-itself."

    Not for the first time you adopt this patronising pose that implies you have 'seen the light' and we have not. I know I speak for myself and I suspect I speak for many here, when I say I have long been interested in acquiring knowledge and understanding for its own value, not in order to make me a more efficient consumer. I would appreciate it if in your future posts you stopped singing to a choir who have already moved on from a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, to a full blown Wagnerian masterpiece.

    5. "Get a life—get an intellectual life!"

    Get a grip! Get a grip of reality. You don't appear to have it at the moment.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,702
    There are a lot of theories for how we should live our lives.

    Yamamoto Tsunotomo who I wouldn't follow any more than you, yet has more credibility due to his actual practice of what he preached, which ultimately and quite simply was his willingness to die for honor, whereas you are someone on a forum whom I know nothing of.

    He was a nostalgic fellow, following the code of yesteryear. To him there were two great things you can do in life, one was to be a samurai and one was to be a monk. So he did both. In his later years as a monk a journalist recorded a lot of his sayings and bits of wisdom. He said that a samurai should not learn Buddhism at a young age because then they would serve two masters. Related to this is also that in youth it is natural to devote one's life to vitality, that is focus on being strong, mobile and energetic in both body and mind. And in one's later years it is proper to study and learn, since one's body naturally weakens and one's mind slows down it is more suited for concentrating on relatively simple words instead of complex situations.

    Similar to this man's philosophy is Socrates, although their definitions of honor may differ, they were both willing to die for it. Socrates said it was proper for the youth to fight, and as they got old to begin to learn.

    Of course "old" back then may be around middle age, so in this sense it doesn't differ from what you say. My problem with what you say is that intellectualism is not an end to itself. Intellectualism comes, as all fulfilled ISMS, with a sense of accomplishment, honor, self righteousness, happiness... um, fulfillment.

    Being smart is not an end to itself, learning is not an end to itself. What you speak of as resonance comes naturally to some and they do not need to learn about it.

    From an existential view point, YOU need to be more intellectual, this is why you are preaching it. See, lots of people tell other people the things they should be telling themselves. And here we are, spreading our own lack of individual drive. Seeking someone else to show us what our own desires bring.
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    924
    Quote Originally Posted by John Galt
    Coberst, I have no idea what it is, or why it is, but I find almost nothing to agree with in any of your posts and much to disagree with. It is as though you had deliberately chosen to distort truth and warp reality, for what purpose I cannot begin to imagine. In your latest post here are just some examples of what I mean.

    .
    You raise an important question.

    Why are so many people so negative?

    It might be the case that many people confuse being negative with being critical.

    It might be the case that young people think that to be negative is to be cool? Why they think this? I suspect that only a good psychiatrist would know.

    Another possible answer is that being a “responder” is the basis for these phenomena. If I want to respond and I know nothing about the subject matter then it is quite easy to respond ‘X is not true’ when the OP says ‘X is true’.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    924
    marcus

    We were born smart enough but we weren’t born intellectually sophisticated enough to handle this high tech world we have invented.

    What is the difference between “being smart” and “being sophisticated”? I would say that we can use the handyman and his tool box as a good analogy for comprehending this difference. The number and quality of the instruments in a handyman’s tool box is a measure of his smartness and his experience using those tools is a measure of his sophistication.

    If a handyman has only a hammer then every job is a job that will get hammered on. If that handyman has a great tool box but has experience only with a hammer then that handyman will look for things that can be hammered into place.

    What’s in your tool box that you can use efficiently?

    Do you know how to become more intellectually sophisticated? Become a self-actualizing self-learner.

    In other words we must rely on our self to initiate the changes that our society requires if we hope to survive the next 200 years. The older generation is too set in its habits and only the impulsive action of the newer generation suitably guided by sophistication provides us with the possibility of evolving a better society.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by coberst
    You raise an important question.

    Why are so many people so negative?
    Good point. Can you tell me why you are so negative? Why do you feel the vast majority of people, even the majority of people on this forum, are virtually automatons? What has led you to such a negative conclusion? It seems strange that someone who claims to be interested in critical thinking and self actualisation, would deny that many others may already be travelling some distance down that path. Can you account for this blind spot in your thinking?

    It might be the case that young people think that to be negative is to be cool? Why they think this? I suspect that only a good psychiatrist would know.
    I don't think we need a psychiatrist for that, do you. It's just part of the 'rebellion of youth'. Was it a Brando line, in response to the query, 'what are you rebelling against?' says 'What have you got?'.

    No, I think the more interesting question is why an older person such as yourself should be so negative. Why do you feel there is nothing in our society other than consumer pressure? Why do think you are one of so very few people who actually thinks, or values intellectual pursuits? Those are good questions. I am glad you raised them.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Professor marcusclayman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,702
    Are you claiming poetic license? Whether or not you are, please explain what you mean by your use of these words.

    in⋅tel⋅lec⋅tu⋅al
    –adjective
    1. appealing to or engaging the intellect: intellectual pursuits.
    2. of or pertaining to the intellect or its use: intellectual powers.
    3. possessing or showing intellect or mental capacity, esp. to a high degree: an intellectual person.
    4. guided or developed by or relying on the intellect rather than upon emotions or feelings; rational.
    5. characterized by or suggesting a predominance of intellect: an intellectual way of speaking.

    smart
    –adjective
    7. quick or prompt in action, as persons.
    8. having or showing quick intelligence or ready mental capability: a smart student.
    9. shrewd or sharp, as a person in dealing with others or as in business dealings: a smart businessman.
    10. clever, witty, or readily effective, as a speaker, speech, rejoinder, etc.
    11. dashingly or impressively neat or trim in appearance, as persons, dress, etc.
    12. socially elegant; sophisticated or fashionable: the smart crowd.
    13. saucy; pert: smart remarks.

    so⋅phis⋅ti⋅ca⋅tion
    –noun
    1. sophisticated character, ideas, tastes, or ways as the result of education, worldly experience, etc.: the sophistication of the wealthy.
    2. change from the natural character or simplicity, or the resulting condition.
    3. complexity, as in design or organization.
    4. impairment or debasement, as of purity or genuineness.
    5. the use of sophistry; a sophism, quibble, or fallacious argument.


    Smart can mean many things and sophistication doesn't mean skilled.

    Using your toolbox analogy I will contest that "smarts" is not the amount of tools you have, it is how organized those tools are; and "sophistication" is not your ability to use those tools, it is your ability to convince others you can use them- without actually using them. For example, holding a ruler up to various objects without keeping track of measurements.

    Sophistication, as you use it, means skill, and so you should use the word "skill" instead.

    And back to the topic

    Resonance and how do we find it?

    It is my opinion that we make it. We are not born with set talents. We are born with potential and everything we experience and choose can lessen or change this potential, but nothing can ever raise it.

    If we are brought up poorly our potential is hindered greatly. We can thus CHOOSE a more efficient way to use what is left of our potential. Being brought up well keeps our potential high, but we must still CHOOSE how we will use it. So there are those who waste great potential on little things and those who use what little potential they have to accomplish great things.

    How do you discover what best suits your potential? It is natural, it is in everything you do. Learn about yourself, study your own life and be creative. You like surtain types of foods, why? You look surtain types of hobbies, why? You are interested in different subjects, why? You are good at something youve never done, and you are bad at something you do a lot, why?

    You are doing what best suits your potential, the day you realize that, the day you stop feeding the anxiety beast trying to fulfill some promise of self deception is the day you can actually "get a life" but sorry it won't be an "intellectual life" it will be a "complete life" and your talents, whether they be intellectual or not will show themselves naturally.


    I need to correct an earlier post of mine. I'd edit it, but I'd rather point it out for my own sake and for the sake of those who may have already read it.

    " Socrates said it was proper for the youth to fight, and as they got old to begin to learn. "

    This is ridiculous. I didn't mean to imply that Socrates says to START learning at middle age, but to begin devoting one's life to learning at an older age.

    The reason we shouldn't do this at a young age is because we are more impulsive and don't have the experience necessary for sound judgment. We fight at a young age to get this experience. Even if we fight for the wrong things, so long as we are serious and observant of our lives, we learn from it all.
    Dick, be Frank.

    Ambiguity Kills.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Isotope Bunbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,590
    To John Galt I just want to say "hear, hear" and "bravo", and to assure you that Coberst's "interpretation of the American environment" is not an accurate one.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    924
    marcus

    this is the definition that fits my use of these words:

    Smart--having or showing quick intelligence or ready mental capability: a smart student.

    Intellectual--of or pertaining to the intellect or its use: intellectual powers.

    Sophisticated—my analogy explains my use of the word.

    We find our resonance by introspection. We find what fits us by trial and error.

    Experience leads me to believe that if one does not begin an intellectual life before 40 that it is unlikely that they will ever have an intellectual life.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by Bunbury
    To John Galt I just want to say "hear, hear" and "bravo", and to assure you that Coberst's "interpretation of the American environment" is not an accurate one.
    Thank you. Have no fear: I have had the opportunity to visit the US many times and have had several American work colleagues and friends. His is a very narrow perspective. This is unfortunate as some of what he says has elements of truth, but his universal application to all life in the US largely devalues his arguments.

    (I was going to say wholly devalues his argument then realised I was about to fall into the same trap. If only he would actually apply his much vaunted critical thinking to his own writing.)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •