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Thread: Part 2 - The double slit experiment, cluster and galaxy rotation, time gradients and dark matter

  1. #1 Part 2 - The double slit experiment, cluster and galaxy rotation, time gradients and dark matter 
    Forum Freshman Rarry's Avatar
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    In the second part, (see signature links) the thoughts about light and time are taken a step onward and the question is asked that if time is not fundamental, but possibly related to probability wave collapse, could this have any consequences which we might be able to discern in the universe? Curiously, the answer is yes. Quite a few anomalies could be be explained by this, and in doing so could dispense with the need for theoretical 'dark matter'. Clearly this is just speculation, but it's interesting to look at known anomalies and ask if they could be explained this way.

    Galaxy rotation curves show excess speed towards the outside rim of many galaxies. This aberration is ascribed to dark matter, but this theoretical substance is still a mystery and has never been directly detected, only supposed from the calculation of rotation from Newtonian physics. But this excess speed could also be explained by a time gradient where time is 'stickier' at the centre of a galaxy and less so towards the outside where it can be seen that there are significantly fewer photon or probability wave 'events'.

    The question of the possibility of time running differently is explored on the website. The physicist John Wheeler once said that 'Time is what prevents everything happening at once', and we know that time passes differently in different locations. Time almost certainly wasn't a 'thing' until our reality came into being from the big bang, and time slows to a stop near a black hole, so to suggest time running differently is hardly revolutionary. Space would still appear 'flat' and perhaps the only obvious observation that time gradients might occur withing galaxies would be that we could see a lot more light in the universe than predicted by theory, and also that we might detect much more gamma radiation which is able to penetrate dust and radiate outward from the nearby galactic cores of our Milky Way and from Andromeda? Curiously, this is exactly what is observed; the mainstream references for these observations are linked on the website and they offer no solutions for the puzzling data. (All references and links on the website are from current accredited mainstream sources, none are from any 'fringe' material.)

    The spiral galaxy NGC 4622 is a fascinating one. Again, this is explored in detail and with diagrams on the website. But to explain briefly, it is a galaxy that has been shown to be rotating 'backwards', where the spiral arms are apparently leading instead of trailing. Dark matter cannot explain this and neither can MOND, but a magnified time gradient could explain it very neatly, and that possibility is also supported by the fact that the only known 'backwards' galaxies apparently also share another very rare property, which is that they seem to have combined with a second smaller galaxy which has merged into the centre and pushed the original galaxy outwards. That could possibly be the mechanism to explain how a time gradient could have been compressed and steepened to not merely speed up the orbiting stars with increasing radial distance, but to do it to such an extent that the spiral arms actually overtake the inner core, an observation that would seem to defy any other credible explanation.

    Other mainstream data from a recent study of 153 galaxies shows that there is a near perfect correlation between the observed galaxy rotation and the visible matter. This surprisingly tight correlation would not hold if dark matter is included in the calculation so perhaps this is another piece of evidence to suggest that we do actually live in a 'WYSIWYG' universe? Maybe the visible matter really is all that is there and the aberrant rotation curves don't need dark matter to explain them?

    It isn't a case of selective confirmation bias as there is more evidence to suggest effects related to other significant anomalies where this could be a credible cause than there are where it could not apply. Galaxy cluster orbits could also be explained by time gradients, but with greater correlation with the likely effect than by somewhat vague assumptions about invisible matter, and a significant number of other known anomalies could also be interpreted as having the same cause.

    Admittedly, this is likely to be incorrect and isn't suggested in any way as some wacky revolutionary theory to overturn established science, but just to correlate known facts and to point out that the evidence, if logically considered, could suggest that this might be a viable alternative explanation of what is happening, and perhaps a simpler one? Is it any more extreme than the currently favoured idea of dark matter, which requires the existence of vast amounts of invisible theoretical matter that so far has not been proven, doesn't solve the observed problem in certain circumstances, doesn't correlate with other known facts, doesn't reflect or absorb light, interacts only with gravity and can't be made of anything currently understood by science? The mainstream has favoured the idea of dark matter for nearly a century, sometimes going through logical contortions to try to fit the theory to the data, but considering the lack of success in finding any definitive evidence, shouldn't we be also trying to look for alternatives?

    Thanks for reading if you got this far.


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    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rarry View Post
    Galaxy rotation curves show excess speed towards the outside rim of many galaxies. This aberration is ascribed to dark matter, but this theoretical substance is still a mystery and has never been directly detected, only supposed from the calculation of rotation from Newtonian physics.
    And by gravitational lensing.

    And from simulations of the large scale structure of the universe.

    And from baryon acoustic oscillation measurements.

    But apart from that ...

    But this excess speed could also be explained by a time gradient where time is 'stickier' at the centre of a galaxy and less so towards the outside where it can be seen that there are significantly fewer photon or probability wave 'events'.
    Can you explain the source of this "time gradient" and also show that it predicts the observed rotation curves.


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