Notices
Results 1 to 11 of 11
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By MeteorWayne
  • 1 Post By Pong

Thread: how archeological architecture and artifacts go beneath the surface of earth?

  1. #1 how archeological architecture and artifacts go beneath the surface of earth? 
    Forum Junior xxx200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    214
    friends

    we have heard of great archeological findings of ruins of architecture and artifacts etc. huge walls, scrolls, statues etc. but how come all these stuff went beneath the surface of earth?

    firstly it is not caused by human destruction since we found that when we destroy an architecture, it completely is demolished on the surface of the earth.it never goes beneath the earth. so these archeological architecture and artifacts is not destroyed by human being.

    then how come they go beneath the surface of earth?


    possible hypothesis:

    there was a layer replacement on earth: the surface layer goes down and lower layer comes up. only then any architecture and artifacts connected with the surface layer goes down and lower layer comes up on which we today are walking. now when we digg up the layer we found architecture and artifacts that is connected with the surface layer gone down.





    "simplicity is the ultimate sophistication": leonardo da vinci
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,627
    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post

    possible hypothesis:

    there was a layer replacement on earth: the surface layer goes down and lower layer comes up. only then any architecture and artifacts connected with the surface layer goes down and lower layer comes up on which we today are walking. now when we digg up the layer we found architecture and artifacts that is connected with the surface layer gone down.
    This doesn't really make sense. What do you mean by "gone down" and "lower layer comes up"

    The majority of the sites are buried by simple deposition of material that is eroded away from other locations (usually up slope). Some sites are buried by deposition of organic material over time (eg getting overgrown) . some sites are the result of natural disasters (volcanos, floods, landslides, etc)


    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Junior xxx200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post

    This doesn't really make sense. What do you mean by "gone down" and "lower layer comes up"

    The majority of the sites are buried by simple deposition of material that is eroded away from other locations (usually up slope). Some sites are buried by deposition of organic material over time (eg getting overgrown) . some sites are the result of natural disasters (volcanos, floods, landslides, etc)
    there are 3 main cause of burial:

    1] abandoned by inhabitant

    when inhabitants abandoned a site, natural forces cause destruction of dwelling house. due to decay of vegetation soil rises above earlier level causing the last remnant of the house buried.

    but is it really the case? today if any house is long abandoned by human being, it gradually decays but does its last remnant buries underground? is thing thing happened in countryside? in anywhere? i think no.

    2] natural forces

    here soil from highland got eroded and got deposited in the lowland. thus lowland got buried. again this process is not seen in anywhere in the world. in desert area site may be covered by sand storm. but yet in the desert area there is many cities and oasis not covered by sandstorm. this process of covering site with sandstorm is not seen today.

    3] volcanic eruption

    site got buried under lavas and ashes. example: pompeii. but today there are many volcanic eruptions that do not bury any city or population.

    so all the 3 reasons are SELF CONTRADICTORY.

    they are not the real reason.

    even we cannot say that earthquake did that. today no earthquake bury any city underground.



    "simplicity is the ultimate sophistication": leonardo da vinci
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Wow, what can you say to such a simplistic POV.
    pyoko likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,627
    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Paleoichneum View Post

    This doesn't really make sense. What do you mean by "gone down" and "lower layer comes up"

    The majority of the sites are buried by simple deposition of material that is eroded away from other locations (usually up slope). Some sites are buried by deposition of organic material over time (eg getting overgrown) . some sites are the result of natural disasters (volcanos, floods, landslides, etc)
    there are 3 main cause of burial:

    1] abandoned by inhabitant

    when inhabitants abandoned a site, natural forces cause destruction of dwelling house. due to decay of vegetation soil rises above earlier level causing the last remnant of the house buried.

    but is it really the case? today if any house is long abandoned by human being, it gradually decays but does its last remnant buries underground? is thing thing happened in countryside? in anywhere? i think no.
    If they are left long enough, yes they do get buried, it takes time, so saying you don't see it happening yes is not a viable statement. Look at how quickly the Aztec/Maya settlements were buried.

    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post
    2] natural forces

    here soil from highland got eroded and got deposited in the lowland. thus lowland got buried. again this process is not seen in anywhere in the world. in desert area site may be covered by sand storm. but yet in the desert area there is many cities and oasis not covered by sandstorm. this process of covering site with sandstorm is not seen today.
    What do you mean this is not seen anywhere? What is your evidence of that? Venice and other delta settlements are sinking, as are sections of Chicago and areas of the Seattle waterfront/downtown.

    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post
    3] volcanic eruption

    site got buried under lavas and ashes. example: pompeii. but today there are many volcanic eruptions that do not bury any city or population.
    you clearly haven not actually researched any possible examples of this. The cities of Plymouth, Monserrat Plymouth, Montserrat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia and and Amero, Columbia Armero tragedy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia have both been destroyed/buried by volcanos in the last 30 years.

    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post
    so all the 3 reasons are SELF CONTRADICTORY.

    they are not the real reason.

    even we cannot say that earthquake did that. today no earthquake bury any city underground.
    They are not self-contradictory, there is plenty of physical proof for each type.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,338
    Actually one of the most exciting neolithic sites, Gobekli Tepe, was "deliberately" buried. It seems locals used it as a garbage dump for thousands of years after its heyday.
    pyoko likes this.
    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Masters Degree
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    703
    Also,
    modern city doesn't appear to sink because each building rest on a bedrock hundred meters underground. The structures doesn't rest at the ground level. You can build on sand or at sea if you do this way (they put massive support column that extend far underground)...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Junior xxx200's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    214
    If they are left long enough, yes they do get buried, it takes time, so saying you don't see it happening yes is not a viable statement. Look at how quickly the Aztec/Maya settlements were buried.
    how do you know Aztec/Maya settlements were buried because people abandan it? where it is written? deserted house goes underground : where will i see this phenomenon?


    What do you mean this is not seen anywhere? What is your evidence of that? Venice and other delta settlements are sinking, as are sections of Chicago and areas of the Seattle waterfront/downtown.

    i have written about sandstorm and soil erosion from highland. i did not write about flood. i saw that flood buried cities. i am not a fool to deny that fact. you perhaps accept my point that sandstorm and soil erosion cannot bury cities or settlements. if not, please show example where sandstorm and soil erosion from highland buried cities today.



    "simplicity is the ultimate sophistication": leonardo da vinci
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,602
    xxx200, I congratulate you on thinking about these problems and trying to come up with answers. However, your attitude that "anything you think of must be correct and all established theory must be wrong" will hinder your learning. You need to learn to be more open minded (without losing the critical thinking).

    Quote Originally Posted by xxx200 View Post
    deserted house goes underground : where will i see this phenomenon?
    In the many examples of archaeological sites.

    There is a description of some of the mechanisms here, along with some examples: The Straight Dope: How come archaeological ruins are always underground?
    Without wishing to overstate my case, everything in the observable universe definitely has its origins in Northamptonshire -- Alan Moore
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Radioactive Isotope Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    4,627
    Im sorry xxx200, but "i didn't see it so its not happening" is not a valid argument against anything.
    If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world. -Thorin Oakenshield

    The needs of the many outweigh the need of the few - Spock of Vulcan & Sentinel Prime of Cybertron ---proof that "the needs" are in the eye of the beholder.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Forum Professor jrmonroe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,444
    xxx200, your thinking has a few basic flaws.

    #1 How does your idea that "soil rises above earlier level" work? Why would lower levels of soil rise? Which of the lower levels would rise? What force would cause levels of soil to counteract gravity?

    #2 You say that "this process of covering site with sandstorm is not seen today" and "please show example where sandstorm and soil erosion from highland buried cities today". So here you can read that Mauritania is getting buried under sand as Saharan dunes shift 3 to 4 km (2 to 3 miles) per year. Whole houses have been consumed, and entire cities have been abandoned. Read this article, and look at these photographs

    #3 You say that "there are many volcanic eruptions that do not bury any city or population" and you also apply this idea to sandstorms not burying every city. Just because some volcanoes bury some houses or cities does not mean that all houses and cities must be buried by volcanoes or sandstorms. You are turning reality around and expecting it to work in reverse. This is like saying that "forum member xxx200 can communicate in English but not in other languages ... how can this be?"

    In answer to these three ideas, I can say that soil does not rise but sandstorms and volcanoes can bury houses and cities (and they do). If you google "Lapindo" or "Sidoarjo", you will learn about a mud volcano that erupted in the middle of the Indonesian city of Sidoarjo.
    Grief is the price we pay for love. (CM Parkes) Our postillion has been struck by lightning. (Unknown) War is always the choice of the chosen who will not have to fight. (Bono) The years tell much what the days never knew. (RW Emerson) Reality is not always probable, or likely. (JL Borges)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 31
    Last Post: February 23rd, 2012, 08:14 AM
  2. Artifacts from a sinkhole
    By Bunbury in forum History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: March 20th, 2011, 12:43 PM
  3. archeological world population figures?
    By 3llusion in forum History
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 5th, 2010, 09:44 PM
  4. why is the basalt beneath the granite?
    By heaventian in forum Earth Sciences
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: December 23rd, 2008, 05:01 PM
  5. Measring distance of a point on earth surface to...
    By gruff in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: July 16th, 2006, 12:42 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •