Notices
Results 1 to 15 of 15
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By Jack1941
  • 1 Post By John Galt

Thread: Moon kiss

  1. #1 Moon kiss 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I live in Billings Montana
    Posts
    71
    Did the moon hit the earth?
    There is geologic evidence that something really big hit themoon. I would like to suggest that it might have been the earth. There arescars on the moonís surface (back side) that give evidence that somethingreally big hit the moon; building mountains and leaving huge scrape marks alongthe surface of the moon. Also, the fact that the side of the moon that alwaysfaces earth is very smooth in comparison to the back side. What I also wonderis why are the dark areas on the moonís surface all on the side that faces theearth. I suggest that these dark areas could be remnants of seas that weregathered when the moon struck the earth. These seas are evaporated now, butthere may be evidence of their existence on the moonís surface. This should belooked into. A relatively simple task that would make it possible to verifythat the impact did take place. It is easy to see how the waters would shift tothe earthís side. Like tides, gravity would pull them towards the Earth . Thiswould be quite a sight to imagine. Years ago, when I first conceived this ideaI looked for a location on earth where evidence of the impact might exist. Atthat time I thought that the Pacific Ocean would be a good candidate. But Ireally havenít spent much time considering it recently. It was only after NASAsuggested this week that something really big hit the moon, that I haverevisited the possibilities. I am not sure how accurately our maps that showthe Pacific Oceans bottom represent what is really there.
    I would like to see the United States send a probe likeCuriosity, the probe that is presently on its way to Mars. This unit couldachieve long term research projects. And answer many questions that have yet tobe proposed. We could retrieve a flood of information about the Moon. And it couldprovide us with data for years of research. Even though we have already gonethere and brought back samples, there are a mountain of questions that we haveyet to ask. There is one question that stands out and screams to be asked. Whydid the Moon ring like a bell when that charge was exploded? Is the moonís outershell so uniform that it would ring like a bell? Is there a core to the moon?
    Geologically, there is plenty of evidence to support thistheory. Mountain ranges on Earth appear to be upside down. Could this beevidence of the moons impact? We obviously captured the moon at some time inthe past. The sequence of that capture is not known. But there is an easy toenvision sequence of events that could have included a love kiss of the twobodies.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I live in Billings Montana
    Posts
    71
    A possibility I would like to explore.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    Actually (hate to let facts get in the way) but the far side of the moon is heavily cratered with almost no evidence of any large basins like the near side. No scarps.

    MoonFarSide.jpg

    BTW, you are about 4 decades behind the evidence and science.

    Also, this doesn't belong in Physics.

    The GRAIL mission, with two spacecraft now orbiting the moon is designed to answer many of the real questions (not the rampant unscientific ideas in your post)

    Mission Science Details:

    The GRAIL mission conducts six science investigations:

    1. Map the structure of the lithosphere.

    The lithosphere is the portion of the crust and upper mantle with significant strength over a geological time scale. Since the strength of rock is highly dependent on temperature, the thickness of the lithosphere is directly related to thermal evolution. GRAIL will provide evidence of how rigid the lithosphere was -- and therefore what the thermal conditions were -- at various locations when features were formed.

    2. Understand the Moon's asymmetric thermal evolution.

    The thickness of the crust suggests the extent to which the surface was melted in its early history. The Moon's crust has a variable structure, thinner on the near side than on the far side, except for the the South Pole Aitken basin region, and thinned beneath the major impact basins. Scientists would like to know why.


    2a The Moon's far side, unseen until spacecraft flew over it. Why is it so different from the near side?


    3. Determine the subsurface structure of impact basins and the origin of mascons.

    A surprising discovery was made in the 1960s, when it was found that the Moon's gravity was unexpectedly strong over certain impact basins, and that this is what had been pulling lunar spacecraft off course. It was deduced that these impact basins have large mass concentrations (or "mascons" for short) underneath them. GRAIL will provide more information about their nature.

    4. Ascertain the temporal evolution of crustal brecciation and magmatism.

    Analyses of a set of lunar craters indicates that those which formed less than 3.2 billion years ago show less gravity than the surrounding plain, while those formed earlier show about the same gravity as the surrounding plain. GRAIL will help to explain the reasons, including the roles played by brecciation (the formation of new rocks by cementing together fragments of older rocks, often found beneath impact craters on Earth), magmatism (the movement of molten rock inside the Moon), and isostatic compensation (a process by which a planetary body evens out the distribution of its mass -- for example, by distorting the boundary between the crust and mantle beneath a large impact basin).

    4a Why is there a gravity difference between craters formed less than 3.2 billion years ago and those formed earlier?

    5. Constrain deep interior structure from tides.

    Earth's gravity creates tides in the solid Moon just as the Moon creates tides in Earth's oceans. Of course, the Moon's rocky surface doesn't bulge as much as water would -- it only deforms about 9 cm in response to Earth's gravity from one part of the lunar orbit to another. But what's significant to GRAIL is that the Moon responds to Earth's gravity all the way down to the core, and different internal structures would produce differences in the way the Moon's gravitational field deforms. By analyzing how the field deforms at various parts of the Moon's orbit around Earth, scientists will be able to deduce information about the core and other deep features.

    6. Place limits on the size of a possible solid inner core.

    GRAIL scientists will search for evidence of a solid core within the liquid core the Moon is believed to have, and place limits on how big that solid core could be.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,844
    Information of the Grail project in this thread: Grail Moon Mission
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I live in Billings Montana
    Posts
    71
    It is interesting how people like you try to communicate withothers through the use of insults and efforts to belittle all ides but theirown.

    Grow up.

    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Comet Dust Collector Moderator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    2,848
    No, not just my ideas, but the evidence and ideas using real science.

    Like what I said about your statements about the far side of the moon being refuted by the facts (and image)
    Last edited by MeteorWayne; January 4th, 2012 at 03:27 PM. Reason: Added missing r in your
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I live in Billings Montana
    Posts
    71
    Strange

    It is early Tuesday morning here, and your arrogantinsulting communication is no way to start a day. Too bad you are not actuallypresent, making your smart mouthed comments.
    Strange likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    I live in Billings Montana
    Posts
    71
    Crawl back into your hole.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    grail search
    Posts
    811
    Wow, so much can be grown from this XXXX.

    <why don't we plant something.....an idea.....no hang on, this could interfere with their train of thought.......>
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Brassica oleracea Strange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    喫茶店
    Posts
    16,844
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack1941 View Post
    Strange

    It is early Tuesday morning here, and your arrogantinsulting communication is no way to start a day. Too bad you are not actuallypresent, making your smart mouthed comments.
    Oh, I just thought you might be interested in the other thread. Never mind.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Suspended
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    grail search
    Posts
    811
    No, hang on. The post was made. What's the offer? There's an idea, right, initially?. You know, a valid way of saying something?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  13. #12  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack1941 View Post
    It is interesting how people like you try to communicate withothers through the use of insults and efforts to belittle all ides but theirown.

    Grow up.
    Some comments on this :

    1. I see no insults in MeteorWayne's post - he is merely responding to the OP, and in my mind he did a pretty good job at it too
    2. You have not provided any evidence for your original ideas, other than unsupported statements
    3. If you aren't prepared to hear comments that run contrary to your own ideas, than please do not post on this forum. You are only wasting everyone's time.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  14. #13  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack1941 View Post
    There is geologic evidence that something really big hit themoon. I would like to suggest that it might have been the earth.
    While there is abundant (and conclusive evidence) that the moon has been struck by several very large objects there is no evidence that I am aware of that anything as large as the Earth struck it a glancing blow. The evidence you have presented so far in support of your thesis is invalid. For example we know that the 'seas' are vast lava flow resulting from some of the aforementioned large impacts. Or, in the case of evidence form the Earth, we know that the Pacific is a relatively young ocean. If you have nothing other than these points your idea must be abandoned.


    Mountain ranges on Earth appear to be upside down.
    I was intrigued by this statement. What do you mean by it? It is incorrect. Perhaps you are confused by the fact that in most mountain ranges there are often inverted stratigraphic sequences. The Nappes in the Swiss and Italian Alps spring to mind as classic examples. However, this is quite different from the mountains being upside down.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  15. #14  
    Moderator Moderator Markus Hanke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,302
    Well, I don't know about you guys, but given the difference in masses and elasticity I have a feeling that if the Earth had ever so much as lightly touched the moon in any way, than it wouldn't be here today ?? I find it hard to visualize how it could have gotten back into a stable orbit after a collision such as the one postulated in the OP.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  16. #15  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by Markus Hanke View Post
    Well, I don't know about you guys, but given the difference in masses and elasticity I have a feeling that if the Earth had ever so much as lightly touched the moon in any way, than it wouldn't be here today ?? I find it hard to visualize how it could have gotten back into a stable orbit after a collision such as the one postulated in the OP.
    I am reasonably sure that a grazing collision of the type jack proposes would result in wide separation of the orbits of the two bodies. Someone better versed in the intricacies of orbital dynamics could confirm or deny this. Almost every point Jack has offered in support of his thesis is either wrong, or a misinterpretation.
    I think we should encourage people to do two things. Firstly, think outside the box. Jack has shown he can do this. Secondly, be brutal in seeking to disprove one's own thesis. Jack seems to need help with this.
    Markus Hanke likes this.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Similar Threads

  1. The Moon
    By angrysoba in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: January 17th, 2012, 11:38 PM
  2. strange circle around moon today with moon as centre
    By siddhanth in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 13th, 2008, 12:02 PM
  3. Water on the Moon = Rocket fuel on the Moon?
    By kojax in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 8th, 2008, 01:31 PM
  4. moon
    By Nevyn in forum Astronomy & Cosmology
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: March 4th, 2007, 06:01 AM
  5. Man never went on the moon !!!!
    By veinmetal in forum Pseudoscience
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: December 25th, 2006, 11:57 AM
Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •