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Thread: New Standard Perspective

  1. #1 New Standard Perspective 
    Forum Sophomore Brandon's Avatar
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    New Standard Perspective. Brandon Gibbs Sept. 19, 2010

    I will show how the 2 problems of dark matter and dark energy connected to 1 thing we somehow missed in the past.
    The SMBH (super massive black hole) at the center of every galaxy is being miscalculated. Our perspective on earth is very important why we see these things this way. Much like the demonstrations of falling into a black hole, time gets very distorted depending where you are and what you are looking at. The reason our SMBH in the Milky Way is miscalculated is because our perception doesn’t directly see it the way it is. It’s actually much, much stronger and this high gravity field distorts the things we see in the cosmos.

    First there is dark matter, said to be invisible matter pulling on the stars on the edge of a galaxy. Now when we look at our SMBH with a much bigger gravity field, interesting things happen. In fact, these outer stars are moving slower. But our perception of being in a higher gravity field looking at the lower gravity field these stars are in makes them appear to be moving too fast. This higher gravity field explains everything. The previous dark matter that was spread out all over is wrong, it is simply in our SMBH. Now imagine the stars near the center and they will be moving near C. But again our perception of them being in a much higher gravity field slows them down to a crawl compared to their true velocity.

    Dark energy is a mysterious energy that is expanding space. Now if we apply that SMBH have much higher gravity fields, they would have to be moving toward each other. Visible light is also effected by gravity. SMBH have growing gravity fields. Light gets warped, circled and avoids a straight line traveling through this high gravity cosmos. We see the red light shift simply as light taking longer to reach us. As the gravity of all these SMBH is growing as it consumes matter into a smaller space, light will take longer and longer to reach us. For the galaxies in the deep field, our perception of red light shift is distorted by all the higher gravity fields it must pass to reach us. The light leaving a distant galaxy is being slowed by its own gravity, but our Milky Way gravity cannot accelerate it faster than C, this would cause the red light shift we observe.
    The reason SMBH appear to be smaller than 1 billion solar masses, is because of our perception. The gravity in a black hole is so strong we perceive matter/energy to be frozen in time and almost completely faded from view. If we could get closer, the black hole would appear to be growing the closer we get.

    This concludes our universe has static space and our galaxies are slightly contracting. If General Relativity is correct, and Albert Einstein is correct, than this perception of the cosmos is correct.

    Thank you for reading New Standard Perspective.
    Brandon Gibbs


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  3. #2  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    If General Relativity is correct, and Albert Einstein is correct, than this perception of the cosmos is correct.
    Your paper is confusing. Not sure where in your paper that General Relativity came into play.


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  4. #3  
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    In any case, the mass of the Black hole NEAR our galactic center is indisputable, due to the orbital paths and velocities of the stars orbiting the barycenter of the galaxy.
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  5. #4  
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    Yes thats because our perception is being distorted. but if we increase our esimate we solve for dark energy and dark matter.
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  6. #5  
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    Estimate of what? Where's the math? What are you trying to say? Speak up, CLEARLY.
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  7. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Now when we look at our SMBH with a much bigger gravity field,
    Why do you think the SMBH has a larger "gravity field"? Is this from some scientific observation that you read somewhere? You need to give some evidence for the SMBH having a larger gravity well than what has been currently observed.
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  8. #7  
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    How is that not a more acceptable solution?? It is a lot More scientific to accept this high gravity field distorts our persection. But chosing to accept magic energy and magic matter is more scientific? Give it some time to spread.. its clearly more acceptable
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  9. #8  
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    read it... when we are in a gravity field, things in a different gravity field appear to be moving at different speeds than we measure or visually see.. think of the effects of falling into a black hole. The observer and the person falling have 2 different perspectives of what's happening. Now from what we see is happening in our galaxy. We are experiancing extreme distortion from our smbh because its gravity is much higher than we think it is that causes all these distortions we see (dark matter and energy)...
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  10. #9  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    It is a lot More scientific to accept this high gravity field . . .
    No scientist (or knowledgeable, educated non-scientist) is going to accept a "higher gravity field" without evidence.
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  11. #10  
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    Our estimated mass of our smbh in the center of our galaxy is 400 million solar masses.. I would estimate it much higher if we were a lot closer to it, we would esimate its solar mass at 4 billio.n or more.
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  12. #11  
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    The evidence is dark matter and dark energy.. you just have to understand what I'm saying first...
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  13. #12  
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    Sorry... the evidence is what we think dark matter and dark energy currently is.. its gravity distortion solves both perfectly if time is percieved different in different gravity fields
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    Since you've made no sense, and have presented no real science so far other than "I thought of this great idea that explains the Universe better than the physicists and cosmologists who have been scientifically addressing the subject for a century", why should we believe you? Still waiting for your post that explains it all........
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  15. #14  
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    you aren't even reading anything I write... mean spirited poster? I would of said worse
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    Brandon, I'm not a scientist but I have a fair number of college level Math, Physics, and Astronomy courses under my belt. Plus, I've read a bit. Given that, I must admit that I don't understand what you're posting here.
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  17. #16  
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    Let's look at our milky way galaxy. The smbh at the center has a lot more gravity than we can percieve from earth. This perception is realised when we look outward toward the edge of our galaxy and see stars moving too fast. This is because our percetion from earth is in a higher gravity field than the stars on the edge of the galaxy and makes them appear to be moving too fast. Now the oppositte effect happens for stars in the center of the galaky. They are moving very fast in a high gravity field cause by our smbh, but when we view them our percetion shows them moving a lot slower because the gravity is extremely high. Perciving high gravity areas slows down time, perciving low gravity areas speeds up time. We are near the middle and seeing our perception fool us into thinking dark matter is responsable....??
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  18. #17  
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    I realised this idea after watching a few visual demonstrations of falling into a blavk hole. The obsrever and the person falling into it have 2 different visual perspectives caused by the gravity field they are in during this event... now imagine the same rules apply for our galaxy. The reason we don't see stars on the edge going their actual speed is because they are in a lower gravity field than we are in and we percieve the time of this gravity field to be faster than ours. So the stars will appear to move faster because the time there is percieved as faster..
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  19. #18  
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    The smbh at the center of our galaxy creates a huge gravity field. The closer you are to this smbh the stronger the gravity field is. The further away from the smbh, the weaker its gravity field gets. We are currently in the middle. When we look at stars near the center, they are in a higher gravity field. When we look at stars near the edge, they are in a weaker gravity field. When we look at stars near the center, they are in a higher gravity field and our perception of time in this gravity field slows down. When we look at a star near the edge of our galaxy it is in a weaker gravity field and we percieve time to be faster in this weaker gravity field. Is not that hard to comprehend. Although einstein was in my head showing me what to write haha jk but it made me think of him right away.. its his accepted theories I am using to explain this effect of perception to trick us into thinking dark matter is causing this....??

    No one is going to believe this was one of Einsteins ideas, but I really think it was. He was in the process of trying to prove it, but never could. Since his death more advancements have been made that cause us to accept dark matter. This same conception that stars are moving faster on the edge of our galaxy is eplained when we think of the smbh having a very big gravity field effecting all of the galaxy. Our perception of stars moving too fast on the edge of the galaxy is caused by our perception of looking into a lower gravity field and we percieve time to be happening faster.
    Last edited by Brandon; September 20th, 2011 at 01:05 AM.
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  20. #19  
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    This proposal is a great example of what physicists refer to as, "Not even wrong." This proposal literally takes absolutely no observations as evidence and proposes absolutely nothing about any physical phenomena. It gives us no way to understand a single observation, it only gives us the claim that, when physicists and astronomers say things about galaxies, they are mistaken.
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  21. #20  
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    Exactly.. They are mistaken.. My observations are time dilation being applied to gravity fields in the cosmos. Its completely valid and solves 2 big problems we currently have in astrophysics.. Has it ever been proposed before?
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    Well, yes and no.

    "Yes," in the sense that we suppose that many of the galaxies that we observe have a degree of time dilation from a couple of sources.

    One source is cosmological time dilation. This time dilation can be inferred from the overall redshift of the galaxy. After one removes redness due to the dust and stellar population of the host galaxy, not always an easy feat, this is pretty straightforward.

    Another source of time dilation is gravitational time dilation. Because galaxies are actually pretty small objects, there is not too much in the way of time dilation from their overall gravity. We can estimate the gravity of galaxies in three ways: a) the rotation of the galaxy, b) the brightness of the galaxy, and c) the amount of gravitational lensing that the galaxy causes. a) is pretty straightforward and uses Newtonian methods (because gravities aren't really that massive relative tho their rotation speeds. b) is difficult to use and generally only results in a good lower bound for the mass. c) can only be used in those cases where there is an obviously gravitationally lensed image that is likely to be caused by the galaxy in question. When it can be used, it's pretty awesome.

    All of these methods of estimating the mass of a galaxy tell us that the gravity of a galaxy should have a certain amount of time dilation.

    And, "No," in the sense that the amount of time dilation that we expect from the gravity associated with galaxies is thought to be little and not a serious source of error in our observations.

    If you want to tell us that this is wrong, you will either have to both show us where these estimates go wrong and show us how to more accurately determine these estimate.
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  23. #22  
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    Correct me if I'm wrong but gravity can't slow down light. It can redshift it and bend it (although about half the observed light bending was predicted by Newtonian physics) but gravity can't slow it down. If gravity reaches a critical point, the light cannot escape (event horizon of a black hole) but it still hasn't stopped -- it's just that space has curved in on itself and the light is still traveling along the geodesic path through the warped space within the event horizon.
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  24. #23  
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    Gravity does slow down the time that events seem to occur to those further away from a region of mass. So the events of a more massive galaxy might appear to take a little longer to occur than the events of a slightly less massive galaxy. But the difference is pretty miniscule and is probably below the noise threshold of most observations we're likely to make.
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  25. #24  
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    I think you guys understand me now. But our perception is fucked when we look through the cosmos. The distortion is extreme. Probably more than any scientist esimated it at. Its not impossible to formulate it. When we look at higher gravity, we look into the past kind of. We see its retarded postion. Not its real position. Its real postion is near impossible to figure out unless you are on its surface. It is just an idea but its better than making up new terms to waste rescources to solve when there will be no offical answer..
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  26. #25  
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    Brandon, do you know how we estimated the mass of the SMBH in Sag A*?

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  27. #26  
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    Yes I watched it 30 times before... now using this video.... The gravity field the smbh is producing, is slowing down the perception of time... If we went very close, it would appear to be happening a lot faster than we see in this video. we are looking at a massive time dilation.. Massive!!!!! we have recorded the retarded postion of these stars from our perspective.. Einstein would agree
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  28. #27  
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    If we can detect the time dilation from earths gravity field. Now compare the size of the earths gravity field and a smbh. The diference is huge, so we will have a huge time dilation when looking anywhere in the cosmos. I'm sure hundreds or thousands of cosmologists believe this idea and I'm not the first. But its not even wrong haha wtf does that mean? Dark energy and dark matter is not even right... guess someone needed a salary to look for the impossible. Dam they are going to make a lot of money tryin to find something that doesn't exist.. it sounds like a big ass scam to me...
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  29. #28  
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    Quote Originally Posted by PumaMan View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but gravity can't slow down light. It can redshift it and bend it (although about half the observed light bending was predicted by Newtonian physics) but gravity can't slow it down. If gravity reaches a critical point, the light cannot escape (event horizon of a black hole) but it still hasn't stopped -- it's just that space has curved in on itself and the light is still traveling along the geodesic path through the warped space within the event horizon.
    Thats exactly right.. Its not slowed down literally, its based on perception. As the massive gravity in a distant galaxay grows, its gravity grows and continues to red shift the light from our perspective. Light being viewed from behind another galaxy has near double the red shift because it is passing near another smbh that is also distorting it. Do you understand the concept now? Its not dark energy.. Its light playing a trick on us..
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  30. #29  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Thats exactly right.. Its not slowed down literally, its based on perception. As the massive gravity in a distant galaxay grows, its gravity grows and continues to red shift the light from our perspective. Light being viewed from behind another galaxy has near double the red shift because it is passing near another smbh that is also distorting it. Do you understand the concept now? Its not dark energy.. Its light playing a trick on us..
    Show us the math.

    As it stands now, light passing a galaxy is first blueshifted as it approaches that galaxy and is then redshifted as it moves away.
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    I still don't see any evidence on which your conjecture is based. On what observation(s) are you basing this idea? I know you haven't made any observations so can you cite which ones you've used.

    It's sentence structure like this that makes it very hard for me to continue with trying to understand what you're saying. I still don't. Sorry.

    As the massive gravity in a distant galaxay grows, its gravity grows and . . .
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  32. #31  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Yes I watched it 30 times before... now using this video.... The gravity field the smbh is producing, is slowing down the perception of time... If we went very close, it would appear to be happening a lot faster than we see in this video. we are looking at a massive time dilation.. Massive!!!!! we have recorded the retarded postion of these stars from our perspective.. Einstein would agree
    So, what order of gravitational redshift do you think a massive time-dilation like that would produce, for those stars, as viewed by us?
    Last edited by SpeedFreek; September 22nd, 2011 at 04:24 PM.
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  33. #32  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PumaMan View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but gravity can't slow down light. It can redshift it and bend it (although about half the observed light bending was predicted by Newtonian physics) but gravity can't slow it down. If gravity reaches a critical point, the light cannot escape (event horizon of a black hole) but it still hasn't stopped -- it's just that space has curved in on itself and the light is still traveling along the geodesic path through the warped space within the event horizon.
    Thats exactly right.. Its not slowed down literally, its based on perception. As the massive gravity in a distant galaxay grows, its gravity grows and continues to red shift the light from our perspective. Light being viewed from behind another galaxy has near double the red shift because it is passing near another smbh that is also distorting it. Do you understand the concept now? Its not dark energy.. Its light playing a trick on us..
    It wouldn't work that way. The light coming from that more distant galaxy would blue shift as it "falls" in towards the BH in the nearer galaxy as it is coming towards us from "the other side". When when it passes the BH and starts to climb out again, it will red-shift. But that red-shift will just cancel out the blue-shift it already experienced. After it has left the BH it will have the same frequency as it did before it reached the nearer galaxy. The foreground galaxy will have no net effect on the Doppler shift of the distance galaxy as seen by us.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  34. #33  
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Yes I watched it 30 times before... now using this video.... The gravity field the smbh is producing, is slowing down the perception of time... If we went very close, it would appear to be happening a lot faster than we see in this video. we are looking at a massive time dilation.. Massive!!!!! we have recorded the retarded postion of these stars from our perspective.. Einstein would agree
    So, what order of gravitational redshift do you think a massive time-dilation like that would produce, for those stars, as viewed by us?
    That's one(of the many) downfalls of his whole idea. The gravitational red shift would have to be of the same magnitude as the time dilation. This in turn would result in a huge red shift of the spectral lines from those stars, something that would not go unnoticed, and would immediately tip astrophysicists that something was amiss in their estimates of the mass of the BH at the center.

    Since no such red-shift is observed, our view of those stars cannot not be significantly time dilated.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


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  35. #34  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedFreek View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon View Post
    Yes I watched it 30 times before... now using this video.... The gravity field the smbh is producing, is slowing down the perception of time... If we went very close, it would appear to be happening a lot faster than we see in this video. we are looking at a massive time dilation.. Massive!!!!! we have recorded the retarded postion of these stars from our perspective.. Einstein would agree
    So, what order of gravitational redshift do you think a massive time-dilation like that would produce, for those stars, as viewed by us?
    That's one(of the many) downfalls of his whole idea. The gravitational red shift would have to be of the same magnitude as the time dilation. This in turn would result in a huge red shift of the spectral lines from those stars, something that would not go unnoticed, and would immediately tip astrophysicists that something was amiss in their estimates of the mass of the BH at the center.

    Since no such red-shift is observed, our view of those stars cannot not be significantly time dilated.

    I see... O well
    Last edited by Brandon; September 22nd, 2011 at 10:48 PM.
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