Notices
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: An idea about how human brain works.

  1. #1 An idea about how human brain works. 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8
    I created at this address a simple explanation on how, for me , the human brain works(there is a diagram at the end of the article):


    http://www.wiki-theory.com/index.php...m_brain_theory


    It's a little bit complicated and it's based on what I learned on mathematical logic in a part.


    Are you interested?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Hello nicobzz, I've had a quick read of your 'theory'. I don't immediately see anything exactly wrong with it, but as I hope you are aware it is a very simple description of brain function. We have a much better and deeper and more detailed knowledge of brain function at a structural and biochemical level than is covered in your 'theory'. Have you done much reading of some of the research that has been done?


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8
    Yes I know that there is more knowledge about biochimical explanation, and I know that some parts of the brains correspond to some functions.

    So you know if there is documentation about relations between these functions?

    thank you
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Universal Mind John Galt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    14,168
    Quote Originally Posted by nicobzz
    So you know if there is documentation about relations between these functions?
    I'm sure there is, but this is a subject outside my area of expertise and only peripherally of interest to me.

    I think to fully appreciate this field you would need to do years of studying in chemistry, biochemistry, neurology, anatomy and a host of other specialities. Much of the research is very focused and integrating it in a meaningful way takes an immense knowledege base and a startlingly sharp mind.

    For example, how much do you make of this paper?

    Or consider this abstract from this paper:

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the second most commonly occurring genetically inherited disease in humans. It is an X‐linked condition that affects approximately one in 3300 live male births. It is caused by the absence or disruption of the protein dystrophin, which is found in a variety of tissues, most notably skeletal muscle and neurones in particular regions of the CNS. Clinically DMD is characterized by a severe pathology of the skeletal musculature that results in the premature death of the individual. An important aspect of DMD that has received less attention is the role played by the absence or disruption of dystrophin on CNS function. In this review we concentrate on insights into this role gained from investigation of boys with DMD and the genetically most relevant animal model of DMD, the dystrophin‐deficient mdx mouse. Behavioural studies have shown that DMD boys have a cognitive impairment and a lower IQ (average 85), whilst the mdx mice display an impairment in passive avoidance reflex and in short‐term memory. In DMD boys, there is evidence of disordered CNS architecture, abnormalities in dendrites and loss of neurones, all associated with neurones that normally express dystrophin. In the mdx mouse, there have been reports of a 50% decrease in neurone number and neural shrinkage in regions of the cerebral cortex and brainstem. Histological evidence shows that the density of GABAA channel clusters is reduced in mdx Purkinje cells and hippocampal CA1 neurones. At the biochemical level, in DMD boys the bioenergetics of the CNS is abnormal and there is an increase in the levels of choline‐containing compounds, indicative of CNS pathology. The mdx mice also display abnormal bioenergetics, with an increased level of inorganic phosphate and increased levels of choline‐containing compounds. Functionally, DMD boys have EEG abnormalities and there is some preliminary evidence that synaptic function is affected adversely by the absence of dystrophin. Electrophysiological studies of mdx mice have shown that hippocampal neurones have an increased susceptibility to hypoxia. These recent findings on the role of dystrophin in the CNS have implications for the clinical management of boys with DMD.


    That paper is a review paper - a document that seeks to summarise current understanding of its topic. The author referenced thirty three detailed research papers in preparing the article. Multiply that by the thousands of comparable topics that exist and I think you see there is something of a challenge in place.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5 Re: An idea about how human brain works. 
    Veracity Vigilante inow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    3,499
    Quote Originally Posted by nicobzz
    Are you interested?
    Well, what you have here is more of an analogy or comparison than a theory or model of the inner working of a brain. My reading of your link suggests that you've basically seen a pattern in math and tried to extend that pattern into human perception. Unfortunately, there is not a 1:1 alignment in the way you suggest.

    One thing I find completely absent in your model is how incoming stimuli is compared against previous experience and knowledge. For example, you discuss seeing a bird in the tree in front of you and deducing there is a bird in the tree in front of you. Well, okay... but you've not accounted for how you know it's a bird. What is the internal search taking place to know that's a bird? Does the deduction just magically happen?

    As Ophiolite mentioned, it's very important to understand existing theories, models, and ideas before speculating for very long on new ones. I encourage you to explore sites like the below to help get a more solid foundation (please don't be put off by the title; I explore this site often myself).

    It's fun to speculate, and to look for similar patterns, but it's also important to recognize where our analogies break down and where there are gaps in our models. I might also ask you what testable predictions your model makes that we could use to validate or disprove it. Cheers.


    http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/introb.html

    More like it here: http://mindbrain.ucdavis.edu/about/n...ience-for-kids
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6 Re: An idea about how human brain works. 
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by inow
    Quote Originally Posted by nicobzz
    Are you interested?
    One thing I find completely absent in your model is how incoming stimuli is compared against previous experience and knowledge. For example, you discuss seeing a bird in the tree in front of you and deducing there is a bird in the tree in front of you. Well, okay... but you've not accounted for how you know it's a bird. What is the internal search taking place to know that's a bird? Does the deduction just magically happen?
    that's true that something is lacking about that, I mean observation need learning and so memory to work.
    My goal is not to explain exactly how visual recognition exactly work in brain.
    But we can almost fit what you say in my model about the bird:

    When you were kid, someone like a friend told you "what you see here is a bird" so by sentences recognition (sentences recognition you have learn younger),so by sentences recognition you have made in your head the theorem "my friend told me that what I see is a bird" and as you have the other theorem "my friend certainly dont lie" you created the theorem "What I have just seen is named a bird"... And so you saved in your brain visual area what permits you to create the theorem "What is in front of me is a bird" when you see somethings that look like a bird.

    You are true that certainly others have already thought lot about brain, and if what I'm telling is true, certainly some one has also found it, but I dont know were to find the doc on internet.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Moderator Moderator TheBiologista's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,564
    New hypotheses go in the new hypotheses forum!
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •