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Thread: Could there be many big bangs, instead of one Big Bang?

  1. #1 Could there be many big bangs, instead of one Big Bang? 
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    Could there be multi-smaller big bangs, instead of one big bang?


    There are many black holes in the universe…could be by billions. A black hole is conceived to collapse to infinity, to a size of a point, just like the point source of Big Bang. At the center of galaxy is suspected a monster black hole..cold but too infinitely collapsed as to sustain average of 100-500 billions of orbiting satellite stars, and there are, within the visible universe, some 20 billion galaxies! Why do galaxies formed uncannily similar to one another, disk-liked, separate from one another. Could it be that, like rain, galaxies could have been spread throughout the infinite universe, Are there galaxies from the ,so far, unreachable recesses of the universe.

    Could it be that there are, instead, smaller big bangs, the size of galaxies, the galaxies, themselves, are the many big bangs, not just one big bang, the source of such singular big bang cannot even be localized. The CMBR should have been thicker at the source of that one big bang. But there is none.. The cycle of the universe could just be repeating itself, like rain?.

    Just food for thought.


    Jsaldea12

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  3. #2 eryone there is just one big hol 
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    Sure : "we live we die and dead not ends it ". So for everyone there is just one black hole (or better grey as a black hole isn,t really black according to Hawking ) and thus we speak of "the black hole" while there are as many as there are people, dogs, cats, sheep, sunflowers, molecules, electrons, fotons, quarks anything you can think of. At least that,s my opinion but the famous "Dr Rocket" will be furious about it because such ideas would trouble the mind of young children to much (as if children would have no real trouble on their mind these days).[/img]


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  4. #3 Re: Could there be smaller big bangs, instead of one big ban 
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsaldea12
    Could there be multi-smaller big bangs, instead of one big bang?


    There are many black holes in the universe…could be by billions. A black hole is conceived to collapse to infinity, to a size of a point, just like the point source of Big Bang. At the center of galaxy is suspected a monster black hole..cold but too infinitely collapsed as to sustain average of 100-500 billions of orbiting satellite stars, and there are, within the visible universe, some 20 billion galaxies! Why do galaxies formed uncannily similar to one another, disk-liked, separate from one another. Could it be that, like rain, galaxies could have been spread throughout the infinite universe, Are there galaxies from the ,so far, unreachable recesses of the universe.

    Could it be that there are, instead, smaller big bangs, the size of galaxies, the galaxies, themselves, are the many big bangs, not just one big bang, the source of such singular big bang cannot even be localized. The CMBR should have been thicker at the source of that one big bang. But there is none.. The cycle of the universe could just be repeating itself, like rain?.

    Just food for thought.


    Jsaldea12

    3.4.10
    Thank you for the information boost. I have also heard that they collapse into infinity.

    What happens to a collaps to infinity? What happens when it die?

    Well, imagine a black hole with only relativistic mass (that there's only photons in it).
    Without any heavy mass around it for it to gain a gravitational mass, would it explode?

    Now take another look at the black hole in the center of our galaxy.
    is it going to do that one day?

    Well, this is relativistic mass: m/sqrt(1-v^2/c^2) - m

    If there is no mass for the black hole to gain gravitational mass from, wouldn't it explode?

    Would that be your little big bang?

    Purely hypothetically, ofcourse..
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    Quoted, “If there is no mass for the black hole to gain gravitational mass from, wouldn't it explode? Would that be your little big bang? Purely hypothetically, of course.”

    Hi! You are in a better position to answer that because that original concept is not mine but your analytical mind that is open.. like Hawking, etc.,


    Jsaldea12


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    Quote Originally Posted by jsaldea12
    Quoted, “If there is no mass for the black hole to gain gravitational mass from, wouldn't it explode? Would that be your little big bang? Purely hypothetically, of course.”

    Hi! You are in a better position to answer that because that original concept is not mine but your analytical mind that is open.. like Hawking, etc.,


    Jsaldea12


    3.11.10.
    Well, from what I've heard in school, photons have no gravityfield

    Suppose that we have photons, and that we expose it to a gravity field. Firstly, the added mass from the gravityfield to the photon would've been caused by gravitons.

    Purely theoretically, that must mean that they have gravitons. So the formulae must be:

    m(relativistic) - m = m(gravitational)

    Besides, the photons doesn't keep the gravitons, they would then have been very heavy when they delivered their mass. So they would get rid of the gravitons eventually.

    But that's just a hypothese.
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    A consummate astrophysicist, Richard Powel, made this astonishing deep research:

    Number of superclusters In the visible universe = 10 million
    Number of galaxy groups in the visible universe = 25 billion
    Number of large galaxies in the visible universe = 350 billion
    Number of dwarf galaxies in the visible universe = 7 trillion
    Number of stars in the visible universe = 30 billion trillion


    Mr. Richard Powell, astrophysicist, has e-mail singinglemon@earthling.net...<a href...verse.html</a>

    Can it be that such volume in the visible universe, not to mention, the infinite unreached, unseen recesses of the universe, all emanated from a single point in the universe, the size SMALLER THAN A PROTON?


    Jsaldea12

    4.8.10
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    How many galaxies are there?

    Below is the answer n the FAQ (NASA) Ask the Astronomer?
    In a previous FAQ, I mentioned that a recent Hubble Space Telescope image revealed that there may be over 50 billion galaxies or more in our visible universe. Most of these are very small and faint and would look like the Magellanic Clouds if we could see them up close. The Hubble Deep Field image shows hundreds of galaxies in a region of the sky only an arcminute across; about 1/30 the diameter of the full moon. If this spot of the sky is typical, you can easily estimate how many galaxies there are:

    There are 42,000 square degrees over the full sky, and 60x60 = 3600 spots as big as the Hubble Deep Field per square degree, so the total galaxies is about 3600 x 42,000 x 200 = 3.6 x 4.2 x 2 billion or about 40 billion.
    In our Local Group there are about thirty galaxies, of which only five would be visible at the distance probed by the Hubble Deep Field. This means we have to multiply 40 billion by about 6 to account for these smaller galaxies. That gives us an estimate of about 240 BILLION GALAXIES in our visible universe.
    I think if you asked me this question in a year from now, I would come up with about the same kind of estimate.

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    Highly reputable John of Multiply.com has presented a very meticulous computation of galaxies in the visible universe to be 100 to 180 billion galaxies in the visible universe.

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    Iit is becoming clear the visible universe is getting wider and wider, far wider than we thought it was 200 years ago. What is yet to be computed is the unseen, unreached (by astronomical telescopes), the deep recesses of the universe which is far wider than the visible universe. It is unlimited!! But it is safe to say that such deep, deep recesses of the universe is 10 times MORE vast than the visible universe which has, approximately, 240 billion galaxies, as computed by FAQ NASA or 180 billion galaxies or less, as computed by John Multipy.com. Are there galaxies in those unseen recesses? The answer is yes.

    Thus, what is becoming clear is that the components of the universe, visible and invisible consistently is made of galaxies, with satellite stars, and planets. That as principal components of the universe, galaxies are Big Bangs in their own birthright, though smaller than the conceived ONE BIG BANG, that is conceived came from a SINGLE POINT SMALLER THAN A PROTON??



    Jsaldea12

    4.15.10
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    Here is evidence of how galaxy is formed:

    Taken from resourceful Scientist Vincent is below NASA observation on “cartwheel galaxy” that evolved from EMPTY space, apparently NOTHINGNESS:.(pls see cartwheel galaxy in the internet).

    Quoted: “Evidently, matters in the outer ring of the Cartwheel galaxy are evolved in the so called empty space from an apparent nothingness and these plasmatic clouds vortically coalesce to form as stars in an intensified vortex ring that harmonically resonates around the main galaxy at the center. See a UVS topic on "Black hole, dark matter and dark energy" that elaborates on this apparent nothingness that encapsulate the Cartwheel galaxy.”

    “There is no space empty of field.” - Albert Einstein


    Jsaldea12

    4.16.10
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    Let me correct myself: That observation on cartwheel galaxy is by Scientist Vincent, not NASA.

    jsaldea12

    4.16.10
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    Is it possible there never was a "Big Bang" and the universe always existed?

    that, I think is the answer.
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    I agree. There are “starbursts”, re- Quasars, supernovas in outer space, and reversal collapsed super black holes, that show indication just how the universe could have been filled up with matters, with reversal infinite collapse into black holes, could be compressed even to the size smaller than a proton, .. such starbursts, many starbursts, into matter, and reversal collapses could be recurring by billions of years....


    Jsaldea 12

    4.19.10
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    Kindly permit to expand: The farther we gleam, with our increasing advanced astronomical telescopes, into the outermost recesses of the universe, we find galaxies, quasars,.. all in all, incredible count now, there are billions and billions of galaxies….is this how the universe was created (and re-created) by galaxies? And that if all the galaxies were spread over into fundamental particles, they would fill up all the vacant spaces of outer space…that there is straggling dark matters now.. because the bulks of dark matters were compressed and formed into galaxies.. billions and billions of them in the visible and unfathomable invisible universe. Just thinking.

    Jsaldea12

    5.3.10
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    From John, Multiply.com

    (a) How stars are born::

    11 May 2010

    ESA’s Herschel infrared space telescope has made an unexpected discovery: a hole in space. The hole has provided astronomers with a surprising glimpse into the end of the star-forming process.

    Stars are born in dense clouds of dust and gas that can now be studied in unprecedented detail with Herschel. Although jets and winds of gas have been seen coming from young stars in the past, it has always been a mystery exactly how a star uses these to blow away its surroundings and emerge from its birth cloud. Now, for the first time, Herschel may be seeing an unexpected step in this process.

    A cloud of bright reflective gas known to astronomers as NGC 1999 sits next to a black patch of sky. For most of the 20th century, such black patches have been known to be dense clouds of dust and gas that block light from passing through.
    When Herschel looked in its direction to study nearby young stars, the cloud continued to look black. But wait! That should not be the case. Herschel’s infrared eyes are designed to see into such clouds. Either the cloud was immensely dense or something was wrong.

    Investigating further using ground-based telescopes, astronomers found the same story however they looked: this patch looks black not because it is a dense pocket of gas but because it is truly empty. Something has blown a hole right through the cloud. “No-one has ever seen a hole like this,” says Tom Megeath, of the University of Toledo, USA. “It’s as surprising as knowing you have worms tunnelling under your lawn, but finding one morning that they have created a huge, yawning pit.”

    The astronomers think that the hole must have been opened when the narrow jets of gas from some of the young stars in the region punctured the sheet of dust and gas that forms NGC 1999. The powerful radiation from a nearby mature star may also have helped to clear the hole. Whatever the precise chain of events, it could be an important glimpse into the way newborn stars disperse their birth clouds.

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    (b) Super cluster of galaxies in Coma Cluster, each galaxy contains billion stars.

    Almost every object in the above photograph is a galaxy. The Coma Cluster of Galaxies pictured above is one of the densest clusters known - it contains thousands of galaxies. Each of these galaxies houses billions of stars - just as our own Milky Way Galaxy does.
    Although nearby when compared to most other clusters, light from the Coma Cluster... more




    jsaldea12

    5.14.10
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    I thought Big Bang happened 13 billion years ago, how come new stars are born?


    Jsaldea12

    5.14.10.
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    First published:
    Creation 26(3):15
    June 2004
    by Andrew Rigg
    A team of astronomers from the University of Texas announced a startling discovery this year [2004]. They had used the 4-metre Blanco Telescope in Chile to find a long string of fully formed galaxies.1 It has sometimes been called the Francis Filament, after team member Dr Paul Francis from the Australian National University.
    The astronomers calculated that the supercluster was 300 million light-years across, and right at the most distant edge of the universe, 10.8 billion light-years away. (A light-year is how far light would travel at its current speed of 300,000 km/s (186,000 mps) in a year—9.5 trillion km or 5.9 trillion miles.)
    However, the discovery is a huge problem for evolutionary timescales. These galaxies exist when, according to big bang cosmology, they shouldn’t have had time to form.
    The astronomers used a filter to block out light from other sources. This enabled them to pick out galaxies so far from Earth. They expected to find young, faint ‘proto’-galaxies spread evenly throughout the area. Instead, they found 37 mature, bright galaxies that seem to be lined up in a string, with emptiness elsewhere. It was exactly the opposite of what they expected from the big bang theory. Further observations from Siding Springs Observatory in Australia confirmed this galaxy cluster was real.
    The galaxy cluster lies in the direction of the southern hemisphere constellation Grus (the Crane). At such a distance, evolutionary astronomers assume they are viewing the galaxies as they were around 11 billion years ago. This is allegedly just two billion years after the big bang supposedly formed the universe.


    The research team caused a stir when they reported their discovery at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society on 7 January this year. Astronomers around the world were astonished at how mature galaxies could have formed so fast in the young universe.2
    In the current main evolutionary model, galaxies formed from variations in the density of matter produced by the big bang. Big bangers imagine that the universe needed billions of years before stars and galaxies could form into the recognizable structures we see near the Milky Way galaxy today. But this new discovery is precisely the reverse of big-bang predictions:
    • These galaxies appear to be fully formed, mature structures.
    • The galaxies are aligned in a long string.
    • The string is colossal—more than 300 million light-years long.
    Dr Francis himself expressed the problem, ‘The simulations tell us that you cannot take the matter in the early universe and line it up in strings this large’, he said. ‘There simply hasn’t been enough time since the big bang to form structures this colossal.’
    Naturalistic cosmologists will undoubtedly find a way to fit this new evidence into the atheistic big bang model. However, this would merely show that scientists always interpret facts in the light of theory. Theory, in turn, depends on one’s belief system. The big bang theory is based on naturalism—the belief system that discounts God’s recent supernatural acts to create the universe.
    The existence of such large, mature galaxies lined up in a beautiful filament makes more sense when interpreted within the biblical belief system. That is, God rapidly and supernaturally created fully-formed stars and galaxies on Day 4 of Creation Week. ‘By the word of the Lord were the heavens made’ (Psalm 33:6).3
    Andrew Rigg, Adv. Dip. Min., is a freelance journalist and amateur astronomer. He is founder and executive director of the astronomy ministry, the Association of Christian Astronomers International, and is a member of the AiG Support Group in Western Australia. Return to top.
    Recommended Resources

    jsaldea12
    5.14.10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wild Cobra
    Is it possible there never was a "Big Bang" and the universe always existed?

    that, I think is the answer.
    I would have to lean towards this, since I once asked on this forum about the origin of the big bang and to my surprise I was told that there is no single point from which everything seems to have originated, but rather just a time when everything sprang up everywhere out of nothing. Doesn't quite make sense to me. Personally I believe there's a possible connection between black holes and dark energy and/or dark matter, where the mass of the black hole is actually re-dispersed in some way that either is dark matter or the curvature of space time allows the mass to leak out 'the other side' and further warp the fabric of space time to cause it to expand on this 'other side'. So, a black hole 'here' would be sucking in spacetime (gravity) and spitting it out 'there' (dark matter/energy). Of course this is just one of my imaginative ideas.
    I prefer to use my right brain to study the universe rather than my left brain.
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    EXCERPT, below:

    The Infinite Universe vs the Myth of the Big Bang:
    Red Shifts, Black Holes, Acceleration, Life.

    Rhawn Joseph, Ph.D.,
    Emeritus, Brain Research Laboratory, Northern California,
    Abstract

    The creationist theory of the Big Bang was proposed by a Catholic Priest and implies the existence of a creator. Why the Universe should have had a beginning, or why it would have been created, cannot be explained by classical or quantum physics. To support the myth of the Big Bang, estimates of the age and size of the cosmos, including claims of an accelerating universe, are based on an Earth-centered universe with the Earth as the measure of all things, exactly as dictated by religious theology. Distance from Earth is not a measure of the age of far away galaxies. The myth of the Big Bang cannot explain why there are galaxies older than the Big Bang, why fully formed galaxies continue to be discovered at distances of over 13 billion light years from Earth, when according to Big Bang theology, no galaxies should exist at these distances. To support the Big Bang Myth, red shifts are purposefully misinterpreted based on Pre-Copernican geo-centrism with Earth serving as ground zero. Red shifts are variable, effected by numerous factors, and do not provide measures of time, age or distance. Nor can Big Bang theology explain why galaxies collide, why rivers of galaxies flow in the "wrong" direction, why galaxies clump together creating great walls of galaxies which took from 80 billion to 150 billion years to form. Big Bang theology requires phantom forces, constantly adjusted parameters, and ad hoc theorizing to explain away and to cover up the numerous holes in this theory. The Big Bang is a myth which has been repeatedly falsified. The preponderance of evidence supports the reality of an infinite universe. The infinite, eternal universe has no creator, was not created, dispenses with the need for a "creator god" and does not place Earth at the center of the cosmos. The infinite universe is peppered with infinite gravity-holes ranging in size from those smaller than a Planck length to universe-in-mass holes (Joseph 2010). Super-massive holes in the center of galaxies, galaxy-in-mass holes in galactic clusters, and a universe-in-mass black hole on the outskirts of this Hubble length universe, explains why galaxies cluster together, why galaxies are moving in every conceivable direction and at variable speeds, and why the velocity of distant galaxies are accelerating. The universe is not expanding or accelerating. Distant galaxies are accelerating to their doom, their velocities and red shifts increasing and their illumination dimming as they orbit toward the event horizon of a universe-in-mass black hole on the outskirts of the observable Hubble length universe. Black holes, including those smaller than a Plank length, continually destroy and reassemble matter beginning with hydrogen atoms, thereby giving rise to molecules, planets, stars and new galaxies. Through stellar nuclearsynthesis hydrogen becomes carbon, and stars provide the ingredients for life. In an infinite universe, life has had infinite time to arise from energized aggregates of complex chemical compounds produced by stars created from hydrogen atoms produced by black holes which consist of gravity. There was no Big Bang. The Big Bang is religion masquerading as science. The universe is infinite and eternal, and has no beginning, and, no end.


    jsaldea12
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    Quoted, "The galaxy cluster lies in the direction of the southern hemisphere constellation Grus (the Crane). At such a distance, evolutionary astronomers assume they are viewing the galaxies as they were around 11 billion years ago. This is allegedly just two billion years after the big bang supposedly formed the universe".

    Perhps, this is one of the strongest evidence that there is not one BIG Bang. .The farther we peep into the deeper recesses of the universe with our continuing advanced astronomical telescopes, there are galaxies, matured galaxies that defy the concept that everything originated from one source, that one Big Bang., the farther, the more matured galaxies...instead of getting younger.. that the visible and invisible universe are filled up with galaxies, trillions of them...could these bodies be the multi-big bangs?.



    jsaldea12


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    Quoted from Multiply.com:

    "For decades it was baffling. Out of the still night sky, astronomers peering through their telescopes would occasionally glimpse quick bursts of high-energy light popping off like flashbulbs at the far side of the universe.These bursts seemed impossibly powerful:to appear so bright from so very far away, they must vastly outshine entire galaxies containing hundreds of billions of stars.These explosions, called gamma ray bursts (GRBs), are by far the brightest and most energetic phenomena in the known universe, second only to the Big Bang itself.Scientists were at a loss to imagine what could possibly cause them"

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Is this how the multi-big bangs happen? Not the incredulous, impossible ONE BIG BANG but multi-big bangs, the size of galaxies, occurring even now, the universe renewing itself!!

    jsaldea12
    5.24.10
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    Forum Sophomore schiz0yd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsaldea12
    Quoted from Multiply.com:

    "For decades it was baffling. Out of the still night sky, astronomers peering through their telescopes would occasionally glimpse quick bursts of high-energy light popping off like flashbulbs at the far side of the universe.These bursts seemed impossibly powerful:to appear so bright from so very far away, they must vastly outshine entire galaxies containing hundreds of billions of stars.These explosions, called gamma ray bursts (GRBs), are by far the brightest and most energetic phenomena in the known universe, second only to the Big Bang itself.Scientists were at a loss to imagine what could possibly cause them"

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Is this how the multi-big bangs happen? Not the incredulous, impossible ONE BIG BANG but multi-big bangs, the size of galaxies, occurring even now, the universe renewing itself!!

    jsaldea12
    5.24.10
    I like it. Call me drunk. I'll call you back.
    I prefer to use my right brain to study the universe rather than my left brain.
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