Notices
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: magnetic atoms

  1. #1 magnetic atoms 
    Forum Sophomore
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    140
    this struck me as an idea that might give us the potential to study atomic properties of atoms that are otherwise radio-active or do not exist in nature(such as francium for example). we make tiny round magnets with the poles being inside or outside. i was thinking this could be done by having a small hole in the magnet that the electrical probe can be inserted to make the magnet. make some magnets with the positive on the outside and the negative on the inside. and make some that are the opposite(nevative on the outside). and last make some that dont have a charge at all. each will represent protons, electrons, and neutrons respectively. we can place them together to make the atoms we want and we can observe how the magnetic fields influence each other. this could give us some really good insight into how different matter works. any thoughts would be cool.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,328
    I think that a smooth omnipole magnet would be problematic. I do understand you're allowing for two poles. One problem is it may not be possible to make without gluing a lot of little wedge-shaped magnets together. Then you have an uneven field. Another problem is that if you do have an even field, the field lines must pass through the magnet body.. so it'll be demagnetizing itself. Perhaps the best solution is to assemble multifaceted shell of magnets in a steel honeycomb that orients each (rod) magnet and that the field lines can pass through. In this case there will be cogging between repulsed spheres.

    Id' buy some though, just for fun. :-D


    A pong by any other name is still a pong. -williampinn
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3 Re: magnetic atoms 
    Moderator Moderator Janus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    2,223
    Quote Originally Posted by gravityguru
    this struck me as an idea that might give us the potential to study atomic properties of atoms that are otherwise radio-active or do not exist in nature(such as francium for example). we make tiny round magnets with the poles being inside or outside. i was thinking this could be done by having a small hole in the magnet that the electrical probe can be inserted to make the magnet. make some magnets with the positive on the outside and the negative on the inside. and make some that are the opposite(nevative on the outside). and last make some that dont have a charge at all. each will represent protons, electrons, and neutrons respectively. we can place them together to make the atoms we want and we can observe how the magnetic fields influence each other. this could give us some really good insight into how different matter works. any thoughts would be cool.
    I fail to see how we could learn anything about atoms doing this.
    "Men are apt to mistake the strength of their feelings for the strength of their argument.
    The heated mind resents the chill touch & relentless scrutiny of logic"-W.E. Gladstone


    Edit/Delete Message
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    Forum Freshman DrNesbit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Supermegatopian Labs
    Posts
    98
    You can do the same with a computer model much more easily.

    You'd probably need a better model though, to take care of stuff like quantum weirdness. Atoms can't be modelized as simple magnets - for example, I don't see how you'd reproduce atomic orbitals with magnets.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •