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Thread: Time Travel and Schroedinger's Cat

  1. #1 Time Travel and Schroedinger's Cat 
    Time Lord
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schr%C3%B6dinger%27s_cat

    In short, Schroedinger's cat is a story where a cat is placed in a box with a poison device that is triggered by a random quantum event, such as the decay of a radioactive material. If the random event happens, the poison is released and the cat dies. If it doesn't happen, the poison isn't released and the cat lives.

    A lot of theories in quantum mechanics suggest that the cat exists in both states until an observer actually opens the box and looks in to see which thing happened, after which point, history only remembers one or the other state. If the cat lives, it won't remember dying. If it dies, we won't remember it living.

    A possible time travel theory is that the act of observation played a determining role.


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  3. #2  
    Forum Masters Degree mmatt9876's Avatar
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    If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? I think the cat only exists in the two states of life or death in the mind of a person, not physically. It is just a matter of chance whether an event will take place or not. If anything, the chance of something happening may be simply fully predetermined by the past.


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  4. #3  
    Forum Masters Degree mmatt9876's Avatar
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    To picture all this, think of a box which is pitch black inside. Inside the box there is a glass crystal tuning, with a slight angle, around on a mobile, a button operated laser to pulse at the crystal, and a photographic film surrounding the crystal, in the shape of a horseshoe, so that the laser can fire at the crystal and the crystal can then refract the laser onto the photographic film to form a unique pattern. A user operates the laser and pulses it a number of times, at random. The user pulsing the laser is responsible for the unique pattern that is created on the photographic film, not the person observing the experiment across the room behind the glass.
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