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Thread: First bank of feces

  1. #1 First bank of feces 
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    What do you think about this?
    https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/gor...rst-bank-feces


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  3. #2  
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    I think they are a bit behind.
    Actually I read an article a while ago on a startup compny that was making their own crap. They were culturing bacteria in tanks that mimic the conditions in the digestive tract.
    Same purpose but their crap was pure crap. (sorry)

    I am going to try looking it up for you and will post it if I find it.


    OK, I got it a bit wrong. The process was being developed at University of Guelph in 2013.
    I don't know if they created a company yet.

    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/777515

    Artificial "Poop" Cures Gut Superbug C. Difficile - Medical News Today

    Synthetic 'Poop' Can Cure C. difficile Infection, Study Finds | University of Guelph

    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology Faculty . Dr. Emma Allen-Vercoe


    Last edited by dan hunter; February 13th, 2014 at 01:05 AM.
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  4. #3  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Horses, dogs and rabbits, to name just a few animals, regularly ingest a small amount of dung, especially if they seem to be feeling a bit under the weather. I was taught by those who worked with the animals that it was their way of repopulating their gut flora. Foals have to ingest a bit of the mare's dung to get their digestion operational.

    It seems an interesting theory. Fight micro-biology with micro-biology.
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  5. #4  
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    I know this has been done from time to time. The only case I remember the details of was a woman who was likely to die from her condition she was wasting away because of the diarrhea. The doctors arranged for a "compatible", acceptable anyway, faecal transplant from her husband. The argument being that her system was not likely to suffer from this because she'd lived for a long time with whatever bacterial assortment was in his gut. And it worked a treat. She got well, gained weight and recovered completely.

    The idea of pre-screening transplants when none are available from a close relative sounds like a good idea. Of course, if capsules were available with doses of bacteria to be taken at the onset of such illnesses rather than when things have got desperate they would be needed less often. They might even become the first resort for many stomach-bowel-gut infections in preference to antibiotics which might cause as many problems as they solve.
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  6. #5  
    ▼▼ dn ʎɐʍ sıɥʇ ▼▼ RedPanda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Horses, dogs and rabbits, to name just a few animals, regularly ingest a small amount of dung, especially if they seem to be feeling a bit under the weather. I was taught by those who worked with the animals that it was their way of repopulating their gut flora. Foals have to ingest a bit of the mare's dung to get their digestion operational.
    It seems an interesting theory. Fight micro-biology with micro-biology.

    It tastes like crap too!
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  7. #6  
    Northern Horse Whisperer Moderator scheherazade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedPanda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by scheherazade View Post
    Horses, dogs and rabbits, to name just a few animals, regularly ingest a small amount of dung, especially if they seem to be feeling a bit under the weather. I was taught by those who worked with the animals that it was their way of repopulating their gut flora. Foals have to ingest a bit of the mare's dung to get their digestion operational.
    It seems an interesting theory. Fight micro-biology with micro-biology.

    It tastes like crap too!
    When working with the sled dogs, if they got any cuts on their pads, they were put on amoxicillen and yogurt was added to their diet to help replace any gut flora killed by the antibiotics and prevent them getting diarrhea.
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  8. #7  
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    Quote Originally Posted by sona_p View Post
    What do you think about this?
    I still have the option of dying, right? (jk, or maybe not)

    Do you suppose this "depleted" condition occurs because people cook everything "to death" (literally) and have become very germ-conscious ... anti-septic soap, 5-second rule, bruised fruit aversion, etc?

    Where/how do we originally acquire our gut flora?
    .
    Fetuses are sterile in the womb, but beginning with the birth process, babies are exposed to microbes that originate from the mother and the surrounding environment including breast milk or baby formula. They tend to acquire the flora swallowed from the vaginal fluid at the time of delivery. Because vaginal flora and intestinal flora are similar, an infant's flora may closely mimic the intestinal flora of the mother.

    Another factor affecting the intestinal flora of the newborn is delivery mode. A normal vaginal delivery commonly permits transfer of bacteria from the mother to the baby. During cesarean deliveries, this transfer is completely absent. These babies commonly acquire and are colonized with flora from the hospital's environment and, therefore, their flora may differ from maternal flora. Babies delivered by cesarean section are colonized with more anaerobic bacteria, especially Bacteroides, than vaginally delivered babies. Clostridium perfringens is the anaerobic bacterium most frequently isolated after cesarean deliveries. When colonized, cesarean delivered babies less frequently harbor E. coli, and more often klebsiella and enterobacteria.

    The initial colonizing bacteria vary with the food source of the baby. In breast-fed babies, Bifidobacteria account for more than 90% of the total intestinal bacteria. The low concentration of protein in human milk, the presence of specific anti-infective proteins such as immunoglobulin A, lactoferrin, lysozyme, and oligosaccharides (prebiotics), as well as production of lactic acid, cause an acid milieu and are the main reasons for its bifidogenic characteristics. In bottle-fed babies, Bifidobacteria are not predominant. Instead, enterobacteria and gram-negative organisms dominate because of a more alkaline milieu and the absence of the prebiotic modulatory factors present in breast milk.

    The establishment of an intestinal microbial ecology is very variable at the beginning but will become a more stable system similar to the adult microflora by the end of the breast-feeding period.
    .
    source
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  9. #8  
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    Fetuses are sterile in the womb,
    Quite likely wrong by a huge margin. Considering bacteria outnumber human cells by orders of magnitude in and on each person, I doubt there is anywhere that's sterile--well controlled by the host is probably a better description.

    As it turns out late term fetus already harbor gut biomes resembling their mother:
    http://michaeldomingos.hubpages.com/hub/Babies-Are-Born-Dirty-With-a-Gut-Full-of-Bacteria-New-Research-in-Microbiomes

    Of course regiments of antibiotics during pregnancy probably alter this by quite a bit.
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  10. #9  
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    Little kids still need to eat fistfuls of dirt to get their digestive tracts fully functional. Thank God it is an instinctive response and we don't need to force them to do it.
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  11. #10  
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    Nothing new here...there was a feature on OpenBiome on Catalyst 2 years ago.
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