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Thread: Plant decides parent's genes 'aren't good enough'

  1. #1 Plant decides parent's genes 'aren't good enough' 
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    "In the Purdue experiment, researchers found that a plant belonging to the mustard and watercress family sometimes corrects the genetic code it inherited from its flawed parents and grows normally like its unflawed grandparents and other ancestors."

    They don't know how this could happen. And the first time they submitted their results, a review board thought there had been a mistake. But it appears all was carefully controlled for, and the report came out last month in Nature.

    Is this the unraveling of the carefully constructed mythology around genetics?


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    wow that's pretty weird/cool indeed! But, this must be happening when the 'child' plant is still in it's first growth stadium, otherwise the parents' genes have allready effected the growth process of the plant, and changing them wouldn't help much (I guess).


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    that would be cool, but scary.
    is it the same princple as changing eye colour? my dad+_mum bith have black..(hair..) but im a brown/blond... that kinda idea?
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  5. #4 lalalalaaa 
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    I heard about this, it was in New scientist, yes?

    Talk about disproving mendel's theory. Perhaps there's more than one way of transferring genes, although how is beyond me. They can't use mitochondrial dna, cause it's only pollen. Scary.....
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  6. #5 Re: Plant decides parent's genes 'aren't good enough' 
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    Quote Originally Posted by socrates99
    "In the Purdue experiment, researchers found that a plant belonging to the mustard and watercress family sometimes corrects the genetic code it inherited from its flawed parents and grows normally like its unflawed grandparents and other ancestors."
    The DNA of the offspring is changed sometime in the life cycle of the plant from the flawed inherited DNA?

    I have to read this study.

    Here's a guess; whatever gene is responsible for the 'flaw' spontaneously mutates back to the 'unflawed' version because it is more stable.
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    I read about this somewhere quite recently and I've spent a good deal of time trying to find where and I can't find it.

    The mutation has something to do with the flowers or seed pods fusing together, right? And the offspring repairs the mutation? The article, text, whatever I read it from didn't seem to be confused about the mechanism by which this was taking place. But I can't find it! And I don't remember the specifics. I was thinking it had to do with either epigenetic factors such as methylation or some other other form of genetic tagging or possibly something to do with short interfering RNA. I wish I could find it.

    Is this the unraveling of the carefully constructed mythology around genetics?
    You make it sound like some form of conspiracy. The fact is that mapping genomes is only the first step. Research being done right now is leading geneticists to realize that DNA is not the only form of coding going into cellular development. So many new methods of epigenetic coding are under research right now that the genome may seem like child's play soon.

    Consider this for starters. For decades DNA has been examined for 'genes', i.e. protein coding stretches of DNA. However, modern research is now realizing that what was once called 'junk' may now be utilized in another manner. Instead of coding mRNA to code proteins, they can code RNA to act directly on the cell in various ways. This is revolutionary.
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