Notices
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Killer Bees.

  1. #1 Killer Bees. 
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8,035
    Would killer bees be considered a biological weapon? What if we could breed them to instead of killing people by stinging them to death they just stung them enough to debilitate them?


    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2.  
     

  3. #2  
    Forum Bachelors Degree 15uliane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    depends...
    Posts
    425
    Im not sure how much damage that would do.
    Breeding them could be interesting, but it would terribly affect the ecosystem, and the enemy would have to walk into a nest in order to die.
    Their true power isn't their sting, it is their aggressiveness. The nest is the only place where there are enough of them to kill someone. Their stings are normal, or almost normal.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #3  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8,035
    So, maybe soldiers could carry around perishable grenades containing a small nest of angry bees, and throw them into buildings and/or bunkers before storming them.... oh wait...... then the soldiers would get stung.

    I wonder if we could come up with a pheromone that would make them avoid attacking our soldiers if our soldiers were wearing it?
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #4  
    . DrRocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    5,486
    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    So, maybe soldiers could carry around perishable grenades containing a small nest of angry bees, and throw them into buildings and/or bunkers before storming them.... oh wait...... then the soldiers would get stung.

    I wonder if we could come up with a pheromone that would make them avoid attacking our soldiers if our soldiers were wearing it?
    The ultimate weapon -- get the enemy to hire you for weapon development and strategy formulation.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #5  
    Time Lord
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8,035
    Quote Originally Posted by DrRocket
    Quote Originally Posted by kojax
    So, maybe soldiers could carry around perishable grenades containing a small nest of angry bees, and throw them into buildings and/or bunkers before storming them.... oh wait...... then the soldiers would get stung.

    I wonder if we could come up with a pheromone that would make them avoid attacking our soldiers if our soldiers were wearing it?
    The ultimate weapon -- get the enemy to hire you for weapon development and strategy formulation.
    Hmmm... I'm guessing this particular weapon would *not* violate ITAR.

    More generally, I'm just curious what the limits are for something to be classified as a "biological" weapon. Clearly if we weaponized a disease, that would count. I'm just wondering what happens if we limit ourselves to weaponizing macroscopic animals.
    Some clocks are only right twice a day, but they are still right when they are right.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #6  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    81
    Vespa Japonica.
    Their venom is very potent, and contains horomones which enrage their kin into a frenzy, so you can weaponize that by distilling it, filling rounds with it, shooting in the vicinity of the enemy... It evaporates and mists all over them... if highly concentrated and without impurities like venom, no one near the pheromone's impact would escape the wasp's detection.
    They regularly slaughter colonies of 30,000 bees without a problem, not a scratch, and with only 30 soldiers.
    Unfailing cheap dispensable enemy-seeking bullets.
    And they're as big as your thumb.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #7  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    5,270
    Hmmm, I just dont see this as working.

    How are you feeding and keeping the colonies at a large and healthy enough size that they would do anything? A colony may be large enough to kill maybe 3~ish???? soldiers, so not very effective.
    Then there is the how to transport them to and from combat?
    And what about the environmental disaster from introducing alien species into new areas?
    Plus how do you "deliver" them to the opponent? Anything that would get the colony (30,000 is a lot of mass btw) to the opponent from a distance is likely to harm a significant number of individuals, and disorient the rest.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #8  
    Forum Ph.D.
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    951
    kojax, do you ever sleep? try it sometime
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #9  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    81
    The vespa japonica feeds on bees, whereas killer bees (aka africanized bees, probably better for this purpose because of numbers and accessibility, they are all over and japonica is exclusively in Japan) can eat honey.

    You are correct, optimally they are not intended as killing weapons, but a bee attack is going to screw you up in battle, without a doubt. It's still an excellent advantage.

    Transportation is not too bad a problem, as bee keepers use nicotine/smoke to put them to sleep and take their honey. That should work just as well, perhaps keeping them drowsy with a little bit every minute.

    There is very much an environmental disaster from introducing this species: they can live in deserts and are impossible to remove. They are in Montana, where there are no other bees, right now. Perhaps without a queen they will die. Remove her before battle. Like a pin on a grenade.

    And then delivery... Africanized bees don't have pheromones like vespa does. Perhaps bee claymores/mines or hive-rpgs? And with bee nets, gloves, and whatever else we need on our side, of course, we'll be invulnerable.
    ...I think this could work.

    PS Fizzlooney, I've never seen you contribute to a topic, but you always give useless input, unfailingly, in an aggressive nature.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  11. #10  
    Forum Freshman
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    81
    The irony in Fizzlooney's statement is that it was posted at 3 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  12. #11  
    Time Lord Paleoichneum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    5,270
    Quote Originally Posted by Pomegranate Cameron
    The vespa japonica feeds on bees, whereas killer bees (aka africanized bees, probably better for this purpose because of numbers and accessibility, they are all over and japonica is exclusively in Japan) can eat honey.
    Im not totally sure which of the two species you are advocating for at this point.

    With either group you would have food supply problems, if you were to try to farm them in large enough colony amounts to be anything near useful in combat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pomegranate Cameron
    You are correct, optimally they are not intended as killing weapons, but a bee attack is going to screw you up in battle, without a doubt. It's still an excellent advantage.
    The bee/wasp attack is still dependent on them cooperating and not just scattering to find the queen. If they did attack most severe attacks occur at a nest where there are constant numbers to reinforce the attack. I dont think the same protective nature will apply without queen/hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pomegranate Cameron
    Transportation is not too bad a problem, as bee keepers use nicotine/smoke to put them to sleep and take their honey. That should work just as well, perhaps keeping them drowsy with a little bit every minute.
    Im not sure how often either V. japonica or Apis species hybrids are transported. It may not bee to much of a problem but duration will be a major factor. Too long and you will start loosing some.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pomegranate Cameron
    And then delivery... Africanized bees don't have pheromones like vespa does. Perhaps bee claymores/mines or hive-rpgs? And with bee nets, gloves, and whatever else we need on our side, of course, we'll be invulnerable. ...I think this could work.
    Any of the options you mentioned for delivery will result in massive loss of life to the bees/wasps, mosty through the trauma of delivery (claymores/rpgs) or starvation (mines) vastly reducing the effectiveness of the "attack". How will the extra gear affect the combat ability of the forces using the wasps/bees? And with much of modern combat fought at long distances it really seems impractical.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Bookmarks
Bookmarks
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •